17 Replies Latest reply on Jan 12, 2010 5:48 PM by the_wine_snob

    BMPs or JPGs for HD Timeline

    sneedbreedley Level 1

      I'm editng photo montages. I have always used bmp files and it's clear when editing HD, everything takes phenomenally longer than regular DV. But now I'm shooting the pix with my SONY Z5U and capturing the pix as jpgs. Is this a bad idea? Will this further slow down the editing/rendering process? Should I first convert all the jpgs to bmps in photoshop?

        • 1. Re: BMPs or JPGs for HD Timeline
          dradeke Adobe Employee

          I have usually used either jpgs or PSDs when editing stills in Premiere Pro.  PSD's will use up more memory than jpgs.  In short, jpgs work for me and I imagine bmps would as well.

           

          Dennis

          • 2. Re: BMPs or JPGs for HD Timeline
            Level 4

            Hi,

             

            Interesting question. I used to know this stuff years ago because I actually made a notebook for all the image extensions and who invented them and what they could do, what they were.

             

            For example, Gif images were invented by Compuserve.  They can be a certain bit depth ( I think 8 bits ).

             

            BMP, bitmap, was also invented by someone, as were all the image types...and they all have various characteristics, like bit depth (which translates into how many colors can be described by the binary numbers, how many colors can be " displayed" ) and compression methods (something to do with loga-somethings, math not being one of my strengths)...

             

            It was recently pointed out to me that Premiere ( video in general ) does not depend upon image characteristics (bitmapped- in this sense of the word is generic and doesn't apply to the specific file format BMP) in the same way PRINT media depends on it.  For example, having a 300 ppi image is important for printing on paper, but the video program could care less how many ppi there is.  What the video cares about is how many pixels wide and pixels high an image is.

             

            However, I would bet that ( I don't know this for certain but it stands to reason ) the number of colors in an image (still image ) would matter when the video program interprets the image file.  I would guess that a GIF ( 8 bits ) and BMP ( 16 bit ? ) would display in a video differently, with the BMP having more colors and better color transitions ( nicer shading ).  JPG ( jpeg ), yet another image format invented by I forget who, is compressed and used in cameras because it uses less storage space.  Less space than a RAW or TIFF image ( though some TIFF images can be compressed too, as you know from photoshop choices when you save a TIFF ).

             

            PSD is compressed but can have multiple layers (modern JPG can too nowadays) which on one hand makes the file smaller, but also (the layers) make the filesize bigger...But that is all in BYTE count...storage wise....has nothing to do with bit depth really...which is the characteristic of the images nature according to it's basic structure....  like being an 8 bit file ( GIF ) or 16 bit or 32 bit etc....

             

            So if you are doing HD you would probably want an image file that has more colors and shading qualities than an image that has less due to it's bit depth.

             

            Offhand I would guess that if you take the time to batch process a bunch of JPG images in photoshop to make them BMP you would

            a)  take the same amount of time or more (depending on how fast you are with photoshop) as Premiere would take in rendering the images if in fact there is any difference to Premiere re: JPG compression and BMP.

            b) possibly lose quality in color depth by going to BMP from the JPG.

             

             

            So, I would say " no ".

             

            Rod

             

            : )

             

            Good luck

            • 3. Re: BMPs or JPGs for HD Timeline
              sneedbreedley Level 1

              Are you on medication?

              • 4. Re: BMPs or JPGs for HD Timeline
                Level 4

                I don't think I will try to help you anymore

                 

                 

                Rod

                • 5. Re: BMPs or JPGs for HD Timeline
                  joshtownsend Level 2

                  Do a test and see, shouldn't take a few minutes. On my computer JPG's are fast but then so are TIFF (which are better quality). Depends on your computer and the size of stills your using. The more ram the better when working with stills.

                  • 6. Re: BMPs or JPGs for HD Timeline
                    sneedbreedley Level 1

                    So far the jpgs don't seem to be any slower than the bmps. The strange thing is that when I shoot an avi with the SONY Z5U and convert that to bmps, they are all 1920x1080 at 96 dpi. When I shoot jpgs with the same camera, they are 1440x810 at 72 dpi!

                    • 7. Re: BMPs or JPGs for HD Timeline
                      the_wine_snob Level 9

                      For all of my still images, I keep things in .PSD through any PS work, and then Save_As .PSD for Import into PrPro. TIFF would be my next choice, and .BMP my last. I am not a fan of JPEG compression, and only use that, when my clients need images for the Web.

                       

                      Now, with my digital still capture, I shoot RAW (Nikon NEF in my case), and then process to .PSD with Adobe RAW Converter (ARC), and just keep that format for my entire workflow.

                       

                      One more plus for me, if I am doing heavy manipulation, or creation, is that with a Layered .PSD, I can Import as a Sequence, and then animate each Layer, should I choose to.

                       

                      Good luck,

                       

                      Hunt

                      • 8. Re: BMPs or JPGs for HD Timeline
                        Stan Jones Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                        When I shoot jpgs with the same camera, they are 1440x810 at 72 dpi!

                        That may be a setting for still image capture.

                        • 9. Re: BMPs or JPGs for HD Timeline
                          sneedbreedley Level 1

                          There is no apecific setting, so what I'm doing is creating a batch action in Photoshop converting them all to bmp files and switching their dpi from 72 to 96. This changes them all back to 1920x1080!

                          • 10. Re: BMPs or JPGs for HD Timeline
                            shooternz Level 6

                            This may be more to do with PAR rather than DPI

                            • 11. Re: BMPs or JPGs for HD Timeline
                              Harm Millaard Level 7
                              function(){return A.apply(null,[this].concat($A(arguments)))}

                              switching their dpi from 72 to 96.


                              which is completely irrelevant for video. Maybe if TV's were changed back to printed paper it may become relevant again, but not in the era of LED, OLED or Plasma.

                              • 12. Re: BMPs or JPGs for HD Timeline
                                sneedbreedley Level 1

                                Let me explain. I created a photo montage template PPro project complete with moves and transitions. All I do is import all my new pictures and make some adjustments and voila, I have a finished photo montage. But importing 1440x810 72 dpi pix fouled up all the settings. By converting the pix to 1920x1080 96 dpi pix, everything works perfectly.

                                • 13. Re: BMPs or JPGs for HD Timeline
                                  the_wine_snob Level 9

                                  Actually, it's ONLY the pixel x pixel dimensions and not anything to do with dpi/ppi. So long as you have the width and height set correctly, you could have the dpi/ppi set to 1 or 300, and it would make no difference. Those two dimensions are all that you need to address in your Action. Now, setting the dpi/ppi to 96 will cause no harm (no pun intended), but is not necessary.

                                   

                                  I cannot recall if I posted the link to this ARTICLE, but it might give you some tips on doing the Action and then automating the resizing to suit the video. Just alter the 720 x 480 (and necessary PAR) in my example to match your HD Project.

                                   

                                  Good luck,

                                   

                                  Hunt

                                   

                                  PS - just so that there is no confusion, if you were doing work for print, or for the Web, then dpi (print), and ppi (Web) WOULD matter. Just not for video work.

                                  • 14. Re: BMPs or JPGs for HD Timeline
                                    sneedbreedley Level 1

                                    By converting the 72 dpi to 96 dpi, the dimensions become 1920x1080.

                                    • 15. Re: BMPs or JPGs for HD Timeline
                                      Curt Wrigley Level 4

                                      sneedbreedley wrote:

                                       

                                      By converting the 72 dpi to 96 dpi, the dimensions become 1920x1080.

                                       

                                      Only because you have PS set to re-sample the image.  

                                      • 17. Re: BMPs or JPGs for HD Timeline
                                        the_wine_snob Level 9

                                        Where we are both (Curt and I) coming from is that the dpi/ppi will not have anything to do with the image size, so long as you set your width and height properly in PS. You can leave that unchanged, and just interpolate the pixels for the dimensions. Still, if you find it easier to do it with regard to the dpi/ppi, nothing will be different, so long as you get the dimensions that you need. It's really a "six of one - half-dozen of the other" situations, as the dpi/'ppi will be totally ignored for use in PrPro. If it's easier to arrive at the necessary size that way, nothing is lost.

                                         

                                        Good luck,

                                         

                                        Hunt