7 Replies Latest reply on Jun 20, 2008 10:06 AM by

    OT: Podcasts 101

    Level 7
      I just learned how to make a Podcast (using GarageBand on a MacBook Pro)
      and have several related questions. So far, I've only created simple
      voice recordings - no background music or special effects - saved as MP3's.

      1) Static - So far, my podcasts sound OK except for the background
      noise. If anyone on this list has made podcasts using GarageBand, can
      you tell me how you deal with this problem?

      I've been told that the background static is caused by my computer's
      internal fans, and the solution is to get an external microphone. But a
      salesman in a local store told me that would only be a partial fix. He
      advised me to use a feature called ducking. I did a little research on
      microphones but got confused. I found several forums where people
      suggested getting a mike AND a preamp, or other special equipment. What
      do you use?

      2) Why download? I uploaded a podcast, visited the URL, and it worked
      just fine. So why do so many websites invite people to download
      podcasts, rather than play them online? Is it just a strategy to save on
      bandwidth usage?

      3) How do I create a download link?

      4) Do I need to know anything about the software visitors to my websites
      might use to listen to the podcast? I assume most computers simply
      recognize a default MP3 player, right?

      Thanks.

      --
      David Blomstrom: Pol-IT-ics Expert
      http://www.geobop.org/ | http://www.invisible-republic.org/
      http://www.billysoft.org/ (M$)
      http://www.freedomware.us/Topics/Mac_vs_PC/
        • 1. Re: OT: Podcasts 101
          Level 7
          David Blomstrom wrote:
          > I just learned how to make a Podcast (using GarageBand on a MacBook Pro)
          > and have several related questions. So far, I've only created simple
          > voice recordings - no background music or special effects - saved as MP3's.
          >
          > 1) Static - So far, my podcasts sound OK except for the background
          > noise. If anyone on this list has made podcasts using GarageBand, can
          > you tell me how you deal with this problem?
          >
          > I've been told that the background static is caused by my computer's
          > internal fans, and the solution is to get an external microphone. But a
          > salesman in a local store told me that would only be a partial fix. He
          > advised me to use a feature called ducking. I did a little research on
          > microphones but got confused. I found several forums where people
          > suggested getting a mike AND a preamp, or other special equipment. What
          > do you use?

          For best results you would have a mic going into a mixer where you would
          control the levels and EQ, that would go into your soundcard line input.
          If your relying on your built in line input you may still get static and
          other interference, so using an external USB based sound input device
          would give much better results. I think you can get these that have
          microphone inputs, so you wouldn't need a mixer.

          Never heard of ducking myself, but getting a good mic with a pop shield
          is your best bet. In the UK we have stores called Maplin, they sell pop
          shields for about £10, you can make one yourself with a pair of tights.

          > 2) Why download? I uploaded a podcast, visited the URL, and it worked
          > just fine. So why do so many websites invite people to download
          > podcasts, rather than play them online? Is it just a strategy to save on
          > bandwidth usage?

          When you listen online you are downloading, how else does your computer
          play the file to you? What many people do is use an RSS feed to list
          your pod casts, your listeners then subscribe to the RSS feed using an
          online service or a program like iTunes. When you post a new podcast
          there software automatically downloads it so that they can listen to it
          whenever they want. Thats what pod casting is all about.

          > 3) How do I create a download link?

          Dunno about that one, never actually done it myself. I am sure there
          must be online services that will host your pod cast and help you
          publish the feed.

          > 4) Do I need to know anything about the software visitors to my websites
          > might use to listen to the podcast? I assume most computers simply
          > recognize a default MP3 player, right?

          MP3 should be fine for all computers to play these days.

          Steve
          • 2. Re: OT: Podcasts 101
            Level 7
            Dooza wrote:
            > David Blomstrom wrote:
            >> I just learned how to make a Podcast (using GarageBand on a MacBook
            >> Pro) and have several related questions. So far, I've only created
            >> simple voice recordings - no background music or special effects -
            >> saved as MP3's.
            >>
            >> 1) Static - So far, my podcasts sound OK except for the background
            >> noise. If anyone on this list has made podcasts using GarageBand, can
            >> you tell me how you deal with this problem?
            >>
            >> I've been told that the background static is caused by my computer's
            >> internal fans, and the solution is to get an external microphone. But
            >> a salesman in a local store told me that would only be a partial fix.
            >> He advised me to use a feature called ducking. I did a little research
            >> on microphones but got confused. I found several forums where people
            >> suggested getting a mike AND a preamp, or other special equipment.
            >> What do you use?
            >
            > For best results you would have a mic going into a mixer where you would
            > control the levels and EQ, that would go into your soundcard line input.
            > If your relying on your built in line input you may still get static and
            > other interference, so using an external USB based sound input device
            > would give much better results. I think you can get these that have
            > microphone inputs, so you wouldn't need a mixer.
            >
            > Never heard of ducking myself, but getting a good mic with a pop shield
            > is your best bet. In the UK we have stores called Maplin, they sell pop
            > shields for about £10, you can make one yourself with a pair of tights.
            >
            >> 2) Why download? I uploaded a podcast, visited the URL, and it worked
            >> just fine. So why do so many websites invite people to download
            >> podcasts, rather than play them online? Is it just a strategy to save
            >> on bandwidth usage?
            >
            > When you listen online you are downloading, how else does your computer
            > play the file to you? What many people do is use an RSS feed to list
            > your pod casts, your listeners then subscribe to the RSS feed using an
            > online service or a program like iTunes. When you post a new podcast
            > there software automatically downloads it so that they can listen to it
            > whenever they want. Thats what pod casting is all about.
            >
            >> 3) How do I create a download link?
            >
            > Dunno about that one, never actually done it myself. I am sure there
            > must be online services that will host your pod cast and help you
            > publish the feed.
            >
            >> 4) Do I need to know anything about the software visitors to my
            >> websites might use to listen to the podcast? I assume most computers
            >> simply recognize a default MP3 player, right?
            >
            > MP3 should be fine for all computers to play these days.
            >
            > Steve

            Thanks for the tips.

            --
            David Blomstrom: PolITics Expert
            http://www.geobop.org/ | http://www.invisible-republic.org/
            http://www.billysoft.org/ (M$)
            http://www.freedomware.us/Topics/Mac_vs_PC/
            • 3. Re: Podcasts 101
              Level 7

              "David Blomstrom" <webforumsuser@macromedia.com> wrote in message
              news:g2n6om$gdk$1@forums.macromedia.com...
              >I just learned how to make a Podcast (using GarageBand on a MacBook Pro)
              >and have several related questions. So far, I've only created simple voice
              >recordings - no background music or special effects - saved as MP3's.
              >
              > 1) Static - So far, my podcasts sound OK except for the background noise.
              > If anyone on this list has made podcasts using GarageBand, can you tell me
              > how you deal with this problem?
              >

              that's probably not so much a GarageBand issue as a problem with a) cheap
              mic or cheap mic without a windshield (something like this -
              http://www.jr.com/samson-audio/pe/SAU_WS1/), b) not recording in a studio or
              a room without any sound baffling/dampening (voice-over studios typically
              have the equipment/audio people in one room with all the equipment for the
              recording and the voice-talent is in a small room with a good mic and the
              walls are covered with acoustic foam -
              http://esoundproof.com/Screens/Products/Absorption%20Products/Wall%20Products/Foam%20Produ cts/Pyramids/Pyramids.aspx?gclid=COLzzLLD7JMCFReenAod7n5KWQ),
              c) using an onboard sound card instead of mixing through an amp/mixboard,
              etc.

              > I've been told that the background static is caused by my computer's
              > internal fans, and the solution is to get an external microphone. But a
              > salesman in a local store told me that would only be a partial fix.

              it would be a major fix, though. As mentioned in previous posts, run it
              through a mixer/EQ.
              look at places like http://www.m-audio.com/index.php?do=products.family

              If you want a "professionally" sounding podcast, don't cheap out on your
              tools. I'm not saying you have to buy top of the line stuff, but you're not
              going to want to use standard home-user stuff either.


              • 4. Re: Podcasts 101
                Level 7
                > 1) Static - So far, my podcasts sound OK except for the background noise.
                > If anyone on this list has made podcasts using GarageBand, can you tell me
                > how you deal with this problem?

                Get a better Mic.

                > 2) Why download? I uploaded a podcast, visited the URL, and it worked just
                > fine. So why do so many websites invite people to download podcasts,
                > rather than play them online? Is it just a strategy to save on bandwidth
                > usage?

                Not sure what you mean. By definition, a podcast is an mp3 file that a
                person downloads.

                > 3) How do I create a download link?

                <a href="mypodcast.mp3">my link</a>

                But, typically, you're going to want to use RSS for this part, as people
                will want to subscribe to your podcast.

                > 4) Do I need to know anything about the software visitors to my websites
                > might use to listen to the podcast? I assume most computers simply
                > recognize a default MP3 player, right?

                You use RSS to send them the link, which is to an MP3, so, no, it really
                doesn't matter what software they use to subscribe/play your files.

                -Darrel


                • 5. Re: Podcasts 101
                  Level 7
                  Well, I got off easy. I spent $20 on a Logitech USB Desktop Microphone,
                  and it works perfectly. I can now hear no background noise at all.

                  Thanks for the tips.

                  --
                  David Blomstrom: PolITics Expert
                  http://www.geobop.org/ | http://www.invisible-republic.org/
                  http://www.billysoft.org/ (M$)
                  http://www.freedomware.us/Topics/Mac_vs_PC/
                  • 6. Re: Podcasts 101
                    Level 7
                    David Blomstrom wrote:
                    > Well, I got off easy. I spent $20 on a Logitech USB Desktop Microphone,
                    > and it works perfectly. I can now hear no background noise at all.
                    >
                    > Thanks for the tips.

                    A USB mic is an excellent choice, its basically an external sound card
                    that sends the audio in digital format directly into your computer.
                    Money well spent if it gives you the results that you desire.

                    Steve
                    • 7. Re: OT: Podcasts 101
                      Can you give more info about Podcast