8 Replies Latest reply on Jan 14, 2010 12:06 PM by Lost In My Mind

    Mixed Footage

    Lost In My Mind Level 1

      For Christmas I received a Sony DSC-W290 point and shoot with video capabilities. It shoots 1280x720x24, 29.97Progressive MPEG-4 PAR 1.000 QuickTime. 95% of my projects are done with 1440x1080x32, 29.97Interlaced .m2t PAR 1.333 UFF with the final destination being DVD.

       

      1. Can I put interlaced and progressive into the same project directly?

       

      2. What happens by having two different PARs and frame sizes?

       

      3. What should my project settings be. Should I set them to whichever video is used the most in the project?

       

      4. What setting would I want to use for Rendering?

       

      5. Anything else I should know about doing this?


      Thanks. Cin

        • 1. Re: Mixed Footage
          Adolfo Rozenfeld Adobe Employee

          Hello, Cin.

          For some of your questions, there's more than one possible "correct" solution. So it depends.

           

          Before anything, consider this:

          with the final destination being DVD.

           

          NTSC DVD is always 720x480, either with a 4:3 or a 16:9 frame aspect (which is a consequence of using the NTSC DV or NTSC DV Widescreen PARs).

          So, assuming 16:9, you could just have a NTSC DV Widescreen Comp and user either kind of footage and scale down to fit the frame (The Fit to Comp command will take care of scaling things down automatically to fit the frame - select the video layer, and press Command + Option + F on Mac, or Control + Alt + F on Windows).

           

          1. Can I put interlaced and progressive into the same project directly?

          Absolutely. Just make sure AE interprets interlaced as interlaced and progressive as progressive.

           

          2. What happens by having two different PARs and frame sizes?

           

          As long as AE interprets correctly the PAR and frame sizes, there's no problem. The whole point of interpretation is that AE handles the transform from one pixel aspect to another transparently to the user. In this case, both 1280x720 with a PAR of 1.0 and 1440x1080 with a PAR of 1.33 have a resulting frame aspect which is identical to NTSC DV Widescreen. They are just larger.

           

          3. What should my project settings be. Should I set them to whichever video is used the most in the project?

          If going to to DVD, your Comp should be NTSC DV Widescreen or NTSC DV (unlikely to be what you want, since everything is 16:9). The only reason to use a different Comp setting is if you want to keep an HD master to future-proof your project. In that case, you could have a 1280x720 Comp with a PAR of 1.0 and render to 720x480 with the NTSC DV Widescreen PAR.

           

          4. What setting would I want to use for Rendering?

           

          While DVD always uses MPEG-2 compression, you can just render a Quicktime movie with lossless encoding (Animation, PNG or JPEG2000 codec) and most authoring applications will transcode to MPEG-2 for you.

          • 2. Re: Mixed Footage
            Lost In My Mind Level 1

            Thank you as always Adolfo for your detailed and understandable explanation . It's nice you remember that we all aren't gurus, (but I'm trying!) .  Just a quick question or two. If I make the project settings to match the 1440 footage, the 1280 is too small, so I enlarge it (with your neat shortcut), but doesn't it hurt image quality when you scale up footage? So then I made the comp 1280 and scaled down the 1440 which I thought would lose less info?? I have always used the 'HDV 1080 29.97' comp template thinking that was correct. Yes, I always want HD Widescreen on a DVD for US TV. If I use the NTSC DV Widescreen template you suggested, it doesn't say anything about HD. Will my project still be HD? Finally (for now ), in the render que when I choose 'Format', there is MPEG2 and MPEG2-DVD. Is it the second one that I would want? Thanks again. Cin

            • 3. Re: Mixed Footage
              Adolfo Rozenfeld Adobe Employee

              Cin: The DVD-video standard (ie, discs that you can play on a set-top DVD player) is strictly Standard Definition. Of course, they can and do look gorgeous. But they are always 4:3 or widescreen standard definition (the latter is much better for a widescreen TV, of course).

              If you want to play HD content on a HDTV, you'll want to go with Blu-Ray (you'll need a Blu-Ray player, a Blu-Ray burner and a Blu-Ray capable application such as Adobe Encore) or a hard disk-based player, such as the Western Digital TV (WD TV). You can of course also play back HD content from your computer.

               

              So, if you're going to DVD, making your Comp larger than Widescreen NTSC won't give any advantages, since it will end up being exactly that.

              Setting your Comp to one of the HD presets only makes sense if you get a way to play back HD content (as described above). Or if you want, from the same project, to export SD (NTSC) and HD versions.

               

              Scaling 1080 content (1920x1080 or 1440x1080) to 720 (1280x720) is usually a better idea than the other way around, since yes, scaling 720 content to fit a 1080 Comp would affect quality. 720 content should still look great (but it's not something you can use directly on DVD, as discussed above -  it will have to be converted to Widescreen NTSC for that, and if that's your main target, you could just go with Widescreen NTSC to begin with).

              • 4. Re: Mixed Footage
                Lost In My Mind Level 1

                Just wanted to say thank you Adolfo for ruining my day and maybe my life!!!!     

                 

                The DVD-video standard (ie, discs that you can play on a set-top DVD player) is strictly Standard Definition.

                Are you kidding me??? Then why do I own HD video cameras, and why do they give me the choice of SD or HD if it's just going to be the same? I don't own a HDTV yet, but now it sounds like why bother??  Not to mention it would be much easier to edit with SD than HD I'm sure. Thanks (I guess ). Cin

                • 5. Re: Mixed Footage
                  Adolfo Rozenfeld Adobe Employee

                  You are saying ignorance is a bliss?

                   

                  Don't get depressed. The only thing that is SD-only is the DVD format. There are dozens of ways (ok, maybe not dozens, but still many)  to play and show HD content on an HDTV, just not DVD-Video discs.

                  That said, again, DVD can look great. Even if it's SD.

                  • 6. Re: Mixed Footage
                    Lost In My Mind Level 1
                    You are saying ignorance is a bliss?

                     

                    Duh! It's worked for 30+ years so far . Then you had to come along and enlighten me . Are you sure of your sources?

                     

                     

                    There are dozens of ways (ok, maybe not dozens, but still many)  to play and show HD content on an HDTV, just not DVD-Video discs.

                     

                    What would some of the more common ones be? You mentioned Blu-Ray, but I don't know many people (ok, no one) that owns one. I know that there is a way to put your project back on your camcorder and connect it with an HDMI cable to your TV, but I have never tried that. Seems a little awkward to have to send your camcorder to all your friends and family . Any other viable options? Thanks. Cin

                    • 7. Re: Mixed Footage
                      Adolfo Rozenfeld Adobe Employee

                      What would some of the more common ones be? You mentioned Blu-Ray, but I don't know many people (ok, no one) that owns one. I know that there is a way to put your project back on your camcorder and connect it with an HDMI cable to your TV, but I have never tried that. Seems a little awkward to have to send your camcorder to all your friends and family . Any other viable options? Thanks. Cin

                      Well, there's something called the Internet that looks quite promising

                      Seriously. Vimeo, for instance, allows you to share HD content (mostly 720p) that looks really good. So does YouTube, but as we know, video quality is not their main concern.

                      As far as distributing discs, yes, Blu-Ray is the only widespread option.

                      Most other options would allow you to watch easily HD content on your HDTV, but not to share it with others. The WD TV is about $120 (plus an extrenal hard drive). The Apple TV is $200 something (720 only). Even the Playstation 3 can play HD content in H264 format. So there are many options in this regard.

                       

                      Now, for friends and family, good looking DVDs should be more than fine, shouldn't they?

                      • 8. Re: Mixed Footage
                        Lost In My Mind Level 1
                        Well, there's something called the Internet that looks quite promising

                         

                        That was VERY funny, and made me laugh . I hadn't thought of sharing through the internet,  I thought you had to really shrink your video down to get it on there. I look at a lot of tutorials on YouTube and they don't look particularly good, and when I hit the HD button, they won't play.

                         

                         

                         

                        Now, for friends and family, good looking DVDs should be more than fine, shouldn't they?

                         

                        I guess, I just feel silly (ok, stupid) for telling them they were in HD and not knowing or understanding myself. Also, I put sooo much into my videography that I always want the best possible end result that I can get. Must be that 'A' personality

                        Thanks for your patience, knowledge, and sense of humor. Have a great day. Cin