16 Replies Latest reply on Jan 21, 2010 9:39 AM by Jacob Bugge

    How to have precise rulers?

    nicolanicola Level 1

      I've shown rulers and artboard rulers.  But both of the rulers have strange increments, they go 0, 36, 72...  Is there any way to make it in 10s? 

       

      Also, it's really difficult to guess the ruler point I am at, no icon comes up telling me what measurement I am at when moving a guide.  Sometimes they do but it says dx and dy, and those numbers don't seem to correspond to either the ruler of artboard ruler. 

       

      Can anyone enlighten me how to make life easier for me?

        • 1. Re: How to have precise rulers?
          Jacob Bugge MVP & Adobe Community Professional

          Nicola,

           

          Can anyone enlighten me how to make life easier for me?

           

          That is difficult.

           

          The increments mentioned seem to indicate that you work in points/pixels (File>Document Setup/Edit>Preferences/Units and Undo). With mm/cm they would be in 10s.

           

          If you have View>Guides>Lock Guides unticked, you may adjust positions in the Transform palette/panel.

          1 person found this helpful
          • 2. Re: How to have precise rulers?
            JETalmage Level 6

            Illustrator's rulers are not user-customizable as they are in any other decent drawing progam. You can only select from the units of measure provided: Points, Picas, Inches, Millimeters, Centemeters, and (the absurd) Pixels. On Windows, you can change between those units of by rightClicking the ruler, rather than having to visit the Document Setup dialog.

             

            The increments that are called out--in your case, points at 36 point increments--is a function of the current zoom. If you zoom in to 400% or so, you'll see the callouts change to 12 point increments. At 66% zoom, points will be called out at 72 point increments. You cannot otherwise control it.

             

            When moving a Ruler Guide, you should see the same dashed cursor markers in the rulers that you see whenever moving any other object or just moving the cursor. If you don't, I don't know why.

             

            I don't know where you are seeing readouts labeled dx and dy. On this laptop, X and Y positions display in the Control Panel, the Transform palette, and the Info palette. Distance displays as a single value in the Info palette. The info displayed in the Conrol Panel is partially dependend upon the space available, and changes according to what tool is active.

             

            ALWAYS state your OS and Illustrator version when asking these kinds of questions. Describe FULLY and ACCURATELY what you are seeing and where, and what EXACTLY you are doing to replicate the behavior you are talking about step-by-step.

             

            JET

            • 3. Re: How to have precise rulers?
              tromboniator Level 4

              Right-clicking works to change ruler units on Mac as well, if you have a multi-button mouse, properly configured; otherwise, control-click.

               

              Peter

              • 4. Re: How to have precise rulers?
                nicolanicola Level 1

                Thanks everyone for your replies.  I've just had laser eye surgery so I've not been able on laptop for a day to say thanks.

                • 5. Re: How to have precise rulers?
                  Jacob Bugge MVP & Adobe Community Professional

                  Nicola,

                   

                  For my part you are welcome.

                   

                  I hope the correction will end up exactly right.

                  • 6. Re: How to have precise rulers?
                    nicolanicola Level 1

                    Thanks Jacob, it is.  I can see without contact lenses or glasses, it's amazing, best thing I ever did.

                    • 7. Re: How to have precise rulers?
                      Harron K. Appleman Level 4

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                      • 8. Re: How to have precise rulers?
                        tromboniator Level 4

                        Brtu gimmu, Jrttpm.

                         

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                        • 9. Re: How to have precise rulers?
                          tromboniator Level 4

                          O ,rsmy Jsttpm.

                          • 11. Re: How to have precise rulers?
                            Jacob Bugge MVP & Adobe Community Professional

                            Gu Gseeib sbs Owrwe.

                            • 12. Re: How to have precise rulers?
                              JETalmage Level 6

                              I can see without contact lenses or glasses


                              Congratuations. I can relate.

                               

                              I had LASIK done last July. Being in my mid-50s I went the monovision route (dominate eye for distance, other for near). May sound wierd, but it works. It relieved me of my first-ever set of bifocals, and I'm also delighted with the results. Don't wear glasses at all now, and don't even have to think about bad vision anymore.

                               

                              JET

                              • 13. Re: How to have precise rulers?
                                nicolanicola Level 1

                                Thats cool Jet.  I wish I'd known about that because my Mum got it done too but she wasn't informed of any options for being able to see long and short distances, she is also in her mid 50s.

                                 

                                I had a bit of a panic this morning because my goggles were off when I woke up and my eye felt like it had a contact lens in so I thought I'd took my goggles off and rubbed my eye in my sleep and displaced the wee flap.  Was totally panicking!  Rung the helpline and he said put blink drops in every half hour which I've done and they're fine now - phew!

                                • 14. Re: How to have precise rulers?
                                  Jacob Bugge MVP & Adobe Community Professional

                                  Nicola,

                                   

                                  You, and your mother, should be aware of the loss of natural stereopsis that is the consequence of monovision.

                                  • 15. Re: How to have precise rulers?
                                    JETalmage Level 6
                                    You, and your mother, should be aware of the loss of natural stereopsis that is the consequence of monovision.

                                    "I have to admit, honey, the way he parked that boat was impressive...I mean, considering the man has no depth perception as we know it!"
                                    Jacob, are you speaking from first hand experience here?
                                    Realize: It's quite an easy thing to "try before you buy." You don't jump into it on blind faith. The eye doctor can quite reasonably simulate the results with lenses. In fact, his doing so was a deal-closer in my decision.
                                    Compared to my experience (and that of everyone I've met so far who has had the same procedure), your caution reads as a gross overstatement and over-simplification.
                                    Monovision didn't turn me into Captain Ron, as if I'm suddenly blind in one eye. In terms of depth perception, I can't say I see any appreciable difference at all. I still have both eyes. It's monovision, not monocular vision. I still benefit from normal binocular vision; my brain just sort of "pays attention to" the sharp focus eye for edges. If I look in the distance and close my more near-focused right eye, it's just as great a difference in terms of depth perception as it was when I did the same thing prior to LASIK, either with or without my glasses.
                                    Right now, typing on this laptop, both eyes are looking at the screen, and nothing looks abnormal. I glance upward at the mirror on the far wall and see it normally, too. I ride my bike, sail my boat, scuba dive, and everything else without any "loss of depth perception" that I can sense. And I certainly have fewer "blind spots" without surrounding my eyes with metal or plastic.
                                    The one unanticipated caveat (and kinda comical--you'd have had to be there) was the discovery that I need to use my left eye when looking through the viewer of my SLR. Even that doesn't translate to a trade-off in my estimation, as I consider it far preferable to wearing glasses while using the camera.
                                    Everyone's experience is no doubt different to some degree. By mine, though, I don't hesitate to recomend it. To me, it's a complete godsend to not have to wear glasses or mess with contacts. I wouldn't dream of going back to that. It's also nice to now wear regular glasses (ordinary sunglasses, motorcycle and scuba goggles, safety glasses) when I want to.
                                    If you're of the bifocal age, think of it as sorta like turning that near/far edge from horizontal to vertical; from perpendicular to your nose to parallel to it. No more neck tilting. Just rotate your eyes full circle and see things, without having to look around the obstruction of window frames or smudges.
                                    JET
                                    • 16. Re: How to have precise rulers?
                                      Jacob Bugge MVP & Adobe Community Professional

                                      James,

                                       

                                      Jacob, are you speaking from first hand experience here?

                                       

                                      Indeed, although not with LASIK which I only know of through close relatives, but obviously too little from general experience and research, for which I apologize.

                                       

                                      You may not be like Captain Ron, but your post has made me realize that I am even more like Roc than I feared: according to a belated quick survey of reported research it seems that my experience of stereopsis is only shared by young squirrels, severely dyslexic children, and other unrelated minorities, and may occur as a possible (temporary but disabling and highly uncomfortable) complication when LASIK is not performed on both eyes at the same time.

                                       

                                      The keyword is ambiocularity.