21 Replies Latest reply on Jan 29, 2010 6:04 AM by str4ngS

    Premiere Pro CS2 recognizes Field Order wrong at MPEG2 clips

    str4ngS

      Hi,

       

      In earlier versions of Adobe Premiere Pro (including 2.0) you couldn't slow an interlaced footage extracting all the fields resulting in a half, but still smooth framerate (eg. 60fps -> 30fps). From CS2, this is possible, if you the footage is interlaced. Adobe Premiere Pro is capable of importing MPEG-2 format by default, (however there is MainConcept MPEG2-Pro which I don't want to discuss now). An MPEG-2 content can be interlaced as a DV contents can be and an interlaced content has a property called field-order. This tells the decoder which field (upper or lower) to take first. Recently I discovered that Premiere Pro can't determine field-order correctly at some MPEG-2 clips. I use TMPGEnc Plus 2.5 to convert DV footage to MPEG-2. It creates an MPEG-2 clip that is not recognized correctly by Premiere Pro. Also Adobe Media Encoder creates a footage like this. If field-order is recognized incorrectly and since there is no option to override it, it will kind of disable the user creating slow-motion parts using all the fields by extracting them.

       

      blend1.jpg

      Nasty ghosting can be seen here as swapped fields blend each other.

       

       

       

      If I right-click the footage, select Field Options and check Reverse field dominance it does not affect slow-motion at all. But if I leave it checked and export it as movie (Ctrl+M), re-import it and set its speed to 50%, it works correctly. Also Progressive-flagged (but interlaced) MPEG-2 videos are deinterlaced and slowed down correctly, but this format is non-standard thus I don't want to use it.

       

      blend2.jpg

      The correct behavior.

       

      If I don't swap fields by this option and export a movie, then watch it I can see jumpy movements, which is a perfect sign of incorrectly-ordered fields. Any suggestions? Have anyone else experienced this?

       

      Thanks

      str4ngS

        • 1. Re: Premiere Pro CS2 recognizes Field Order wrong at MPEG2 clips
          Curt Wrigley Level 4

          Have you tried the Interpret footage option to manually tell Pr how to interpret the footage?

          • 2. Re: Premiere Pro CS2 recognizes Field Order wrong at MPEG2 clips
            str4ngS Level 1
            Have you tried the Interpret footage option to manually tell Pr how to interpret the footage?

             

            I tried this option but I can't tell it how to interpret fields.

            interpret_footage.png

            Can you see any field-related?

             

             

            Anyways, I thought that under the Advanced section of File Info I can replace the information, but no success there either. I right-clicked the footage in Project Tab, chose File Info, then navigated to the Advanced section where you can manipulate XMP information (at least I thought).

            advanced_fileinfo.png

            Well this is a wrong-interpreted MPEG-2 file, because according to MPEGValidator, MediaInfo and other media player applications this is Lower field (or bottom) first.

             

            advanced_fileinfo_buttons.png


            At the bottom I clicked Delete All, then Replace All. I selected an XMP file that had Lower Field setting. I opened it as Read Only, but when I clicked OK and I went back to File Info again, it was restored to Upper Field. I'm out of ideas how to override wrong-field interpretation. If this is a bug, would there be any fix for CS2?

            • 3. Re: Premiere Pro CS2 recognizes Field Order wrong at MPEG2 clips
              Ann Bens Adobe Community Professional & MVP

              Check the footage with GSpot to make sure what the field order is, then make sure the sequence/project settings matches your footage.

              When you are using Pro 2 set a project up via Desktop when field order is upper, because default settings for dv project is lower.

              When slowing down footage you can use deinterlace the footage by using Always deinterlace in the Field Options. If the footage is lower field also reverse dominance as Pro default uses lower field when using always deinterlacing.

              • 4. Re: Premiere Pro CS2 recognizes Field Order wrong at MPEG2 clips
                str4ngS Level 1
                Check the footage with GSpot to make sure what the field order is, then make sure the sequence/project settings matches your footage.

                I don't really understand why you don't believe the two applications I mentioned, but checked with GSpot too.

                 

                gspot.png

                The result was the same (lower/bottom field first).

                 

                I've attached a file, test.mpg that is recognized incorrectly by Premiere Pro CS2. Try it for yourself.

                 

                When slowing down footage you can use deinterlace the footage by using Always deinterlace in the Field Options.

                I wouldn't ever wanna do that, this way I'd lose fields and have a 12.5 FPS movie in slow motion. This way I (would) have a 25 FPS in slow motion (if fields were recognized correctly).

                 

                When you are using Pro 2 set a project up via Desktop when field order
                is upper, because default settings for dv project is lower.

                Tried that, no success (even jumpy blendings), also messes up a lot of things if I override the DV standard. It's Premiere that recognizes the field-order incorrectly.

                • 5. Re: Premiere Pro CS2 recognizes Field Order wrong at MPEG2 clips
                  Curt Wrigley Level 4

                  str4ngS wrote:

                   

                  Have you tried the Interpret footage option to manually tell Pr how to interpret the footage?

                   

                  I tried this option but I can't tell it how to interpret fields.

                  interpret_footage.png

                  Can you see any field-related?

                   

                   


                  I missed that you were using CS2.  mpg stuff is handled a lot better in later releases.  Field order is an option in interpret footage in CS4.

                   

                  interpret.jpg

                   

                  Im just curious why you are converting DV to MPG2 before editing.   Thats an unusual workflow.

                   

                  Attached is your sample file interpreted to Lower FF, slowed to 30% on the timeline and exported to mpg pal  format.

                  1 person found this helpful
                  • 6. Re: Premiere Pro CS2 recognizes Field Order wrong at MPEG2 clips
                    str4ngS Level 1

                    Well, I really appreciate your answer and help, but I'm kind of disappointed about newer Premiere releases. When I downloaded CS3 trial and noticed a significant GUI slowdown, that really annoyed me - saw drawing trails of panels from top to the bottom, timecode was flickering when I was seeking in my sequence. Also this was the case when I switched to 2.X from 1.5, while handling of multimedia files speeded-up (for example there were really good improvements in seek-time in compressed-content eg. MPEG-2), but it was acceptable. Is CS4 better or worse in this regard?

                     

                    It also consumes a lot more space and I don't know why. I don't understand if for example Sony and Image-Line (creator of FruityLoops, also known as FL Studio, best and fastest GUI I ever seen) can design a fast-responding and smooth GUI why Adobe can't (1.5 GUI was pretty good though - but it slowed down over time) and why system requirements are scratching the sky over the releases. I feel they keep forcing you buying new hardware and software over the releases. I don't reckon Premiere Pro as a professional software. It nearly offers everything that a common video editor needs for his/her work, but when we talk about offering detailed options and precise particular technical settings (fine-tuning), it fails at all levels (Adobe Media Encoder might be the only exception). I'd be glad if Adobe released a bugfix on this issue for CS2 if this is a bug, because I don't want to upgrade if CS4 means less performance and slowdown.

                     

                    Attached is your sample file interpreted to Lower FF, slowed to 30% on the timeline and exported to mpg pal  format.

                     

                    Thanks for the sample, I watched it, and find it good. Can you slow it down to 50% (smooth 25FPS) without any frame blending (you don't need to upload, just tell me)? Just cuz if you have an interlaced project that is really 50FPS (60 at NTSC), and you have an interlaced video that also makes 50FPS if deinterlaced correctly. You slow it down to half-speed, you get 25FPS, but Premiere needs to render this as an 50FPS footage due to project settings, so it will interpolate every second frame by blending. This could be really annoying (due to ghosting) if you want to make a sharp-edged smooth slowdown. If you turn on deinterlacing, slow-motion will only make 12.5FPS, so then what? No, I don't want to use external plugins like Twixtor, because I can't afford them and I think this is a way too simple task to use bullet-time effect filters.

                    • 7. Re: Premiere Pro CS2 recognizes Field Order wrong at MPEG2 clips
                      Curt Wrigley Level 4

                      Again; if you UG you will see that adobe re-wrote the speed control algorithms.  The slo mo in CS4 is exponentially better than in CS2.

                       

                      The UI problems you describe in your cs3 test are not typical.  Likely a video driver update would fix it for you.

                       

                      And it doesnt stop.  The next release will require 64 bit hw and OS.  You are welcome to stay with old sw if it works for you.  But as you can see, the newer versions have some significant improvements.   Its up to everyone to decide when its worth upgrading.

                      • 8. Re: Premiere Pro CS2 recognizes Field Order wrong at MPEG2 clips
                        str4ngS Level 1
                        The UI problems you describe in your cs3 test are not typical.  Likely a video driver update would fix it for you.

                        I have the proper drivers come from the manufacturer of my video hardware, the slowdown occured on EVERY kind of video hardware where I saw Adobe apps. I don't really want to go deep into hardware and technical stuff, that would be really off-topic, but a music creation software like FL Studio has about the same amount (even more) of buttons, controllers, and panels as Premiere (or Audition) and it is smooth, even on a more than ten-year-old video card (Geforce 2 by NVidia) in a 500 MHz computer. It gets slow though when needs a lot of cpu due to audio processing. Adobe GUI is already slow on a not state-of-the-art but quite fast video card and computer when nothing is being done, even slower if something  (eg. indexing or conforming) is going on in the background. I don't claim Adobe is unusable because of this but I believe developers should pay more attention on writing small, efficient code rather than raising the requirements and avoid bloaty solutions that will end up in a multi-gigabyte application. I'm sure people in Adobe team know what I'm talking about, but it seems optimization would be too expensive for them. They don't care about code-efficiency at all, they are satisifed enough if they can sell what they make. People interested in video editing all have high-end computers, so "no problem to them if this or that is a little slower".

                         

                        Most of the time developers explain slowdowns as they come along with the implementation of new features. They should not be. Another good example is Photoshop. I rarely use it, but have sticked at version 7.0 since it was released, because it offers all features I need plus the GUI of newer versions have been all bloated like Premiere's. I got PS CS2 trial once, and opened an image. Wanted to zoom into it, so I dragged the slider. It got really slow when needed to draw the zoomed picture onto the whole area of the screen. This was smooth in 7.0 (with the same image of course) and the reason of "implementing new features" is unacceptable in this case, because there are no new features in zooming. Photoshop never used any resample filter at zooming (not resizing) for a view that would cause slowdowns and still doesn't use such method, so the slowdown is a fault of the GUI that got bloaty and inefficient.

                         

                        I guess GUI slowdowns became a common problem of Adobe applications in the past years. Since CS versions were released they got a new global, unified GUI that is the same in every application. And what does this new GUI offer compared to the older one? The only thing I know about is the Brightness setting. And this is worth it for slowing down a whole app? I don't think so. Nevertheless, each Adobe app using this implementation has a slow-responding, bloaty GUI.  Adobe applications don't take much advantage of hardware-rendering either. While video cards available in the market support wide-range rendering tasks that could be used as well in video editing, Adobe products don't really use their capacity. They render everything using the CPU. Even After Effects' OpenGL support is too standard, too basic, and bloaty. While 3D games can make the video hardware render a high-detail 3D object with textures at nearly 100fps, Adobe After Effects hardly reaches 10-15 fps at a 25fps project while rotating a solid before a black background (this was tested using AFX 7.0).

                         

                        You are welcome to stay with old sw if it works for you.

                        I'm glad about it, but in this case Adobe should release a fix or patch for Premiere Pro CS2 available on update page. Do developers who are responsible for releasing update and bugfix packs read this forum?

                        • 9. Re: Premiere Pro CS2 recognizes Field Order wrong at MPEG2 clips
                          str4ngS Level 1
                          Im just curious why you are converting DV to MPG2 before editing. Thats an unusual workflow.

                           

                          I convert most of my DV footage into MPEG-2 because I spare a lot of hard-disk space like this. My output format is DVD at even lower bitrates my MPEG2s are, also TMPGEnc does a very good job and causes a very small amount of quality loss. You told me it's not the usual workflow, well it is for me. You wrote it causes 30% slowdown in rendering time. Well, not at my preferred formats. I did a little benchmark on this. I slowed down the same clip (duration: 00:00:05:21) to 50% using different input formats then measured rendering (by pressing ENTER) time. Here are the results:

                           

                          Project-native DV was rendered to cache in 13.8 seconds.
                          4:2:0 colorspace 8000 kbit/s MPEG-2 is rendered to cache in 14.5 seconds (time reduced by 5%) - this is the format I use.
                          4:2:2 colorspace 8000 kbit/s MPEG-2 is rendered to cache in 23.1 seconds (time reduced by 40%).

                           

                          Hardware: single-processor Intel Pentium 4 (2.4 GHz) system with 1GB RAM.
                          Software: Adobe Premiere Pro 2.0 released in 2005

                          OS: Windows XP Professional SP3

                           

                          As you can see, only 4:2:2 colorspace causes the slowdown you are talking about. 14.5 compared to 13.8 hardly makes a 5% slowdown for MPEG-2, this is acceptable for me if I can reduce file size by 70% (PAL D1/DV bitrate is 28800, my MPEG-2s are 8000 max.) without significant quality loss (TMPGEnc does a good job).

                           

                          Still waiting for a bugfix update pack for my version of Premiere Pro.

                          • 10. Re: Premiere Pro CS2 recognizes Field Order wrong at MPEG2 clips
                            Jeff Bellune Adobe Community Professional

                            Still waiting for a bugfix update pack for my version of Premiere Pro.

                            Not gonna happen.  Sorry.

                             

                            -Jeff

                            • 11. Re: Premiere Pro CS2 recognizes Field Order wrong at MPEG2 clips
                              Harm Millaard Level 7

                              Still waiting for a bugfix update pack for my version of Premiere Pro.

                               

                              You know there are still some people waiting for updates for DOS 3.11 and Windows 95?

                               

                              FAT chance that is going to happen.

                               

                              If you are worried about disk space, get another disk. If you don't care about quality loss, continue your workflow and all the generation loss inherent to that workflow.

                              • 12. Re: Premiere Pro CS2 recognizes Field Order wrong at MPEG2 clips
                                str4ngS Level 1
                                Not gonna happen.  Sorry.

                                 

                                That's the attitude Jeff, that needs to be changed, not necessarily mine. You have just confirmed what I always supposed: big companies like Adobe don't really care about either their products nor their customers. They release something buggy, they want people only to buy it, then they don't give a **** about them after. They're only good customers while buying it. Congratulations!

                                 

                                 

                                You know there are still some people waiting for updates for DOS 3.11 and Windows 95?

                                 

                                FAT chance that is going to happen.

                                 

                                If you prefer, let's talk about Windows. You'll definitely find that quite surprising, Windows 3.11 and MS-DOS are still used in many places where new, bloaty softwares are unnecessary (and fortunately there are people like me to recognize this). You definitely will not believe that Windows 3.11 was supported for 18 years (from 1990 to 2008, it was discontinued 2 years ago). Times change, Windows 3.11 is the past, let's talk about Windows 95 (you mentioned). It was released in '95 and supported for until the december of 2001 (6 years). Times change, let's move to Windows XP. Microsoft promised extending the support of XP until 2014. When was it made? 2001. So that is 13 years. Windows 95 was a mistaken one like Vista, Win98 and XP soon took over, but it was still supported for 6 years!

                                 

                                When was Adobe Premiere CS2 released? 2005. Five years gone and it seems to be not supported. Moreover, Premiere is an even more expensive software than Windows XP. Microsoft is the most hated IT multinational oligarchy in the world, but sometimes I think this is just because they are also the most well-known, way much more famous than Adobe. Otherwise, I'm sure, Adobe would take the "credit".

                                 

                                If you are worried about disk space, get another disk. If you don't care about quality loss, continue your workflow and all the generation loss inherent to that workflow.

                                Well, believe me I did a lot of tests and benchmarks before I decided this "generation loss". I edit movies that I burn to DVD, sometimes using even lower bitrates than my converted source footages have (that means no loss). Besides, I don't like wasting. Don't like wasting space, CPU, memory. You have probably gotten used to regard computer parts as spare parts that can be swapped, replaced, even wasted (according to your Vimeo profile), but I won't and there will always be people who will say NO to wasting.

                                 

                                 

                                 

                                Thanks for your "support", guys. Cheers to other users like Curt, who wanted to help. If I find a way to fix this I promise I'll post it here (or somewhere else).

                                • 13. Re: Premiere Pro CS2 recognizes Field Order wrong at MPEG2 clips
                                  Jeff Bellune Adobe Community Professional

                                  That's the attitude Jeff, that needs to be changed

                                   

                                  1. My attitude was direct, succinct and to-the-point.  I'm sorry you don't like it.
                                  2. I don't work for Adobe, nor do I influence Adobe's corporate policies, so even if I was less direct it wouldn't matter.
                                  3. If you want Adobe's corporate attitude changed, please address them directly via email and/or snail mail and not through a User-to-User forum.

                                   

                                  Back on topic:

                                   

                                  Your workflow is non-standard, your computer is ancient by today's standards and your software is outdated by today's standards.  However, it seems to work for you, and that's great.  Correct me if I'm wrong, but you seem to have discovered a workaround that is effective for you, despite the shortcomings I listed.

                                   

                                  You have been given several alternatives by different forum members, and you have rejected all of them.  The ball is in your court, so to speak.  Use the workaround and keep producing, or upgrade your hardware and software and ditch the workaround.  The choice is yours.

                                   

                                  Good luck with whatever you decide.

                                   

                                  -Jeff

                                  • 14. Re: Premiere Pro CS2 recognizes Field Order wrong at MPEG2 clips
                                    Curt Wrigley Level 4

                                    str4ngS wrote:

                                     

                                    Im just curious why you are converting DV to MPG2 before editing. Thats an unusual workflow.

                                     

                                    I convert most of my DV footage into MPEG-2 because I spare a lot of hard-disk space like this. My output format is DVD at even lower bitrates my MPEG2s are, also TMPGEnc does a very good job and causes a very small amount of quality loss. You told me it's not the usual workflow, well it is for me.

                                    Its unusual.  You are throwing away a significant amount of video information converting to mpg, editing and encoding again to mpg.  Of course it will work; but its not an ideal workflow.   And as you have detailed yourself; it is causing you problems.  Disk is very cheap these days.

                                    • 15. Re: Premiere Pro CS2 recognizes Field Order wrong at MPEG2 clips
                                      str4ngS Level 1
                                      Your workflow is non-standard, your computer is ancient by today's standards and your software is outdated by today's standards.

                                       

                                      Who says that? Who decides the standards? Customers by buying the new product making it "standard"? Or software companies who force them buying their new stuff by discontinuing support for older products and because they have higher HW-requirements the consumer needs to buy new hardware too no matter his/her hardware is capable of what they want to do (only the software isn't due to bugs or missing basic features). We could also talk about what people use their computers for beyond the opportunity of video editing. Surfing the web, writing blogs, chatting, sending mails, watching videos, listening to music, editing documents in office apps, you know the "standard" tasks. This "ancient" computer is perfectly capable doing these things, however it won't run an OS like Windows 7, but if did that would be used for the same things. I hope you catch my drift. Unnecessary consumerism screws a lot of good things.

                                       

                                       

                                      You have been given several alternatives by different forum members, and you have rejected all of them.

                                       

                                      Several? Only one in a nutshell: Buy (buy harddisk, buy CS4, buy new computer, etc.)

                                       

                                      Use the workaround and keep producing, or upgrade your hardware and software and ditch the workaround.  The choice is yours.


                                      I'd gladly use the workaround if I could figure it out. I wasn't able to figure it out, that's why I posted here.

                                       

                                      Btw, what if I wasn't converting videos to MPEG-2 because I want to but used a camera that uses it as a native recording format? The case would be the same, so then what would be the alternative?

                                      • 16. Re: Premiere Pro CS2 recognizes Field Order wrong at MPEG2 clips
                                        Curt Wrigley Level 4

                                        The best "workaround" is to use the native DV format that is designed to be edited with your "classic" hw and sw.  It will save you a lot of grief and give you a better end product.    We cant give your old environment new capabilities.  But you can alter your workflow and get better results.  Its up to you.

                                        • 17. Re: Premiere Pro CS2 recognizes Field Order wrong at MPEG2 clips
                                          Jeff Bellune Adobe Community Professional

                                          I'd gladly use the workaround if I could figure it out. I wasn't able to figure it out, that's why I posted here

                                          I'm sorry.  I guess I misinterpreted this:

                                          If I right-click the footage, select Field Options and check Reverse field dominance it does not affect slow-motion at all. But if I leave it checked and export it as movie (Ctrl+M), re-import it and set its speed to 50%, it works correctly.

                                          I thought that was the workaround you found for slow motion from clips whose field order was interpreted incorrectly by Premiere Pro.

                                          what if I wasn't converting videos to MPEG-2 because I want to but used a camera that uses it as a native recording format? The case would be the same, so then what would be the alternative?

                                          You would have to do whatever it takes to make it work.  There are open-source applications that can convert MPEG2 to AVI using some form of lossless compression, but that would involve the use of more disk space.  There is the MainConcept MPEG Pro plug-in for Premiere Pro that you mentioned that *might* handle the footage, but it, too, involves buying something.  And there's no guarantee it would work: if Premiere is not interpreting the field order correctly, I'm not sure MPEG Pro can do anything about that.

                                           

                                          The reality of the situation is that Premiere Pro 2.0 will never be updated.  With that as the constant, you have to decide how you want to handle your MPEG2 footage.  It will involve some kind of expenditure from you, up to and including changing editing programs.  Believe me, if any of us had a no-cost solution for you, we'd have given it to you by now.

                                           

                                          Actually, while typing this response, it occurred to me that there is a very old freeware program that may help.  It's called ReStream, and it allows you to modify the properties of MPEG2 elementary video streams without re-encoding.  For the clips that cause you trouble in Premiere Pro, you may be able to change the properties in such a way as to get Premiere to recognize the correct field order.  It's worth a shot.

                                           

                                          -Jeff

                                          • 18. Re: Premiere Pro CS2 recognizes Field Order wrong at MPEG2 clips
                                            str4ngS Level 1

                                            Workaround

                                             

                                            1. Import your file by drag&drop or Left Click -> Import... in Project tab.
                                            2. Right click the imported file, choose File Info. This wil generate an .xmp file which name without extension is equivalent to the filename
                                            3. Open this generated .xmp file with a text editor (notepad is fine), it will look like this:

                                              xmpcontent.png
                                            4.  

                                            5. Go to line where xmpFM:videoFieldOrder can be seen.
                                              Change its value from "Upper Field" to "Lower Field".
                                            6. Save the file, then change its attributes to Read Only.
                                            7. Re-import the file. Premiere now will parse it as Lower Field and won't be able to overwrite the file with its own incorrect information.

                                             

                                            ... and voila, field order is correct and slowdown is working correctly.. with CS2.

                                            • 19. Re: Premiere Pro CS2 recognizes Field Order wrong at MPEG2 clips
                                              idar lettrem Level 1

                                              very good  str4ngs. very good indeed. Your insight ( and attitude)  impresses -- at least me ( Dan Isaacs another one)   More of Your kind  around here please !

                                              • 20. Re: Premiere Pro CS2 recognizes Field Order wrong at MPEG2 clips
                                                Jeff Bellune Adobe Community Professional

                                                I have to agree.  Excellent job coming up with that workaround!

                                                 

                                                How did you discover it?

                                                 

                                                -Jeff

                                                • 21. Re: Premiere Pro CS2 recognizes Field Order wrong at MPEG2 clips
                                                  str4ngS Level 1
                                                  very good  str4ngs. very good indeed. Your insight ( and attitude) impresses -- at least me ( Dan Isaacs another one)   More of Your kind around here please !

                                                  I have to agree.  Excellent job coming up with that workaround!

                                                   

                                                  Thank your for your appreciation

                                                   

                                                  How did you discover it?

                                                   

                                                  I collected the ways Premiere determines file information, then found the XMP way. First time I thought this was only to store, not to override it. I worte earlier that I tried to manipulate XMP data then replace it under File Info -> Advanced tab but Premiere always overwrote the file every time I re-imported it, even if I opened as read-only. I realized this is not the right way to replace information and load another XMP, so I tried editing the video file related XMP with a text editor. It occured to me I can also change attributes so the filesystem itself would prevent overwriting. This way it worked.

                                                   

                                                   

                                                  Workaround got even simpler

                                                   

                                                  I wrote a small batch script that will create XMPs for MPEGs from one sample XMP file. This is useful if you have lots of MPEGs having the same format specifications. In this case you can avoid editing every XMP file by hand (for instance if you have 30-50 MPEGs). You can run this before starting Premire for a whole folder of MPEGs, so it will create the necessary files then make them read-only, also Premire won't cache them. The only thing you need is a sample XMP from a file with format specs matching the others. The script won't modify the specified .XMP file at all. You need to modify at least one .XMP file before getting started. It is recommended to copy this script to a folder that is included in %PATH% (e.g. C:\Windows), thus can be used everywhere as a command.

                                                   

                                                  This batch script requires at least Windows NT 4 (2000, XP or higher) to run properly.

                                                   

                                                   

                                                  Example of usage

                                                   

                                                  Open a command line interpreter (cmd.exe) in the folder you have your MPEGs.
                                                  Execute the script like this: multixmp test.xmp

                                                  Now it will search for .mpg, .mpeg and .m2v files in the current folder it will generate an .xmp file for every .mpg and .mpeg in the folder as you can see the status lines (in this example there are whatisthis.mpg, Sequence 01.mpg, Sequence 02.mpg, slow30.mpg, x3.mpeg in the folder):

                                                   

                                                  C:\Temp>multixmp test.xmp
                                                  Copying test.xmp -> whatisthis.xmp
                                                          1 file(s) copied.
                                                  Copying test.xmp -> Sequence 01.xmp
                                                          1 file(s) copied.
                                                  Copying test.xmp -> Sequence 02.xmp
                                                          1 file(s) copied.
                                                  Copying test.xmp -> slow30.xmp
                                                          1 file(s) copied.
                                                  Copying test.xmp -> x3.xmp
                                                          1 file(s) copied.
                                                   

                                                   

                                                  As you can see it will create an .xmp for every MPEGs from test.xmp (it won't copy test.xmp to itself). Script attached, enjoy.