3 Replies Latest reply on Jan 27, 2010 1:48 PM by Steve Grisetti

    Export Uncompressed QuickTime from Premiere Elements

    ShunnyBug

      I need to send some HD video tha I shot to a video

      production company for editing.  They asked for "uncompressed QuickTime format".  How do I do this in Premiere Elements?

       

      Shelly

        • 1. Re: Export Uncompressed QuickTime from Premiere Elements
          Steve Grisetti Adobe Community Professional

          To do this, you'll need to create your own output preset. And it's kind of a waste anyway -- since the video in your camcorder is compressed and so is the video while you're working on it in Premiere Elements. But here goes:

           

          Go to Share/Personal Computer and select Quicktime. Then click the Advanced button.

           

          In the Advanced option menu, set your Video Codec to None (from the drop-down menu), slide the Quality slider to 100%, set the Width and Height and Frame Rate to the specs of the video you're getting from your camcorder.

           

          When you click the OK button, the program will ask you if you want to save this as a preset. Give it a name it and will be available in the future whenever you want it.

           

          Uncompressed video really is more a characteristic of a professional workflow rather than a consumer workflow. Programs like After Effects, Premiere Pro and Final Cut are much more likely to work with it than a program like Premiere Elements.

          • 2. Re: Export Uncompressed QuickTime from Premiere Elements
            ShunnyBug Level 1

            Thank you Steve. That was pretty easy. I assumed that you meant "Apple None" for the Codec, as there was not a choice for plain old "None".  My 7 second video wound up being a whopping 1.2gb.  Wow.

            • 3. Re: Export Uncompressed QuickTime from Premiere Elements
              Steve Grisetti Adobe Community Professional

              Yes. Uncompressed video is between 1 and 2 gigs per minute of video, I think. About four times that for hi-def.