28 Replies Latest reply on Feb 11, 2010 9:02 AM by the_wine_snob

    19:6 clips into a 4:3 project

    Craig in Egypt Level 1

      Hi

       

      I've trawled the forum for info regarding this in Premiere 8. Most of the information seems to be for making a 4:3 clip widescreen and not the other way around, which is what I'm after in order to make use of some free clips I have.

       

      When I drag a PAL widesceen clip into my 4:3 PAL project, there is obviously a height difference. I have seen mention of a function called 'interpret footage' in some postings, which is accessed by right click on a clip from the media bin. That doesn't show for me and I'm not sure if it's what I need in any case.

       

      Is there a utility in Pr8 to crop a widescreen clip at the edges or make it conform to 4:3?

       

      Thanks for your help and apologies yet again for the newbie nature of these posts.

       

      Craig

        • 1. Re: 19:6 clips into a 4:3 project
          Steve Grisetti Adobe Community Professional

          Right-click on the clip and select Show Properties and then, in the Properties panel, open the Motion properties.

           

          If you set Scale to 135%, the clip will fill your 4:3 frame (although the left and right sides will, of course, be cropped off).

          • 2. Re: 19:6 clips into a 4:3 project
            Craig in Egypt Level 1

            Thanks Steve. That's brilliant. :-)

             

            Do you and Bill by any chance work for Adobe?

            • 3. Re: 19:6 clips into a 4:3 project
              the_wine_snob Level 9
              Do you and Bill by any chance work for Adobe?

               

              In my case, it's no. Steve maintains the same thing, but I do see him driving around in the "official" Adobe van...

               

              No, neither of us works for Adobe. We are both just users, who enjoy helping other users here.

               

              In my case, I've been using Adobe programs for decades, and have owned and used many of them. I'm rather fond of Adobe, due to those years of usage, as their software has made me a lot of money, and saved me a lot of time - plus they're fun for me to use.

               

              Hunt

              • 4. Re: 19:6 clips into a 4:3 project
                Steve Grisetti Adobe Community Professional

                Same here. I've been using this program since version 1 and I've been using Adobe programs professionally since the mid-1990s.

                 

                But, nope. Not a penny compensation from Adobe.

                 

                Unless you count the time they flew me out to San Francisco to tape this testimonial that appears on this page of their Web site.

                 

                I spend most of my day writing books on Adobe Premiere Elements and Photoshop Elements ... and looking for a paying job.

                • 5. Re: 19:6 clips into a 4:3 project
                  the_wine_snob Level 9

                  Steve,

                   

                  Did Adobe dub in James Earl Jones' voice?

                   

                  Had forgotten about that promo piece. Thanks for sharing the link again.

                   

                  Hunt

                  • 6. Re: 19:6 clips into a 4:3 project
                    Craig in Egypt Level 1

                    Thanks Guys.

                     

                    Good to get your background information. You are both clearly expert in this area and I certainly wouldn't have made as much progress without your kind assistance and for this I am very grateful. :-)

                     

                    I'm in that awful 'learning curve' period at the moment where I want to run before I can walk. As you'll see from our company website www.funkgurus.com we're primarily a music services company based in the Middle East. We have a nice recording studio here and music is our thing - picture is whole new ball game for us (other than receiving a quicktime movie that people need music for). We're enjoying the new process anyway and hope to capitalise on the general lack of audio/visual production skills in this region!

                     

                    We're run Apple's Logic pro 9 and Soundtrack pro and can do voice over and music composition skills for a fraction of the cost of UK and US companies - simply because of where we are located. So if I can help you in any way - please let me know. Our technical bumf is at the bottom of this posting for anyone who's interested. Sorry for the bit of blatent marketing here but I have mouths to feed! haha.

                     

                    Wishing you a productive day.

                     

                    All the best from the Red Sea

                     

                    Craig.

                     

                    Our main studio is powered by state of the art Apple iMacs, running music  industry standard 'Logic Pro 8' applications. Additionally we utilise  'Soundtrack Pro' and 'Final Cut' for our broadcast industry standard mastering  and synchronisation projects.

                     

                    Our recording soundpath is just as impressive. In order to obtain complete  clarity, we use high quality industry standard condensor microphones and 'MOTU'  interfaces and pre-amps. Our studio monitoring is taken care of by Mackie MR8,  Yamaha HS50M and JBL reference monitors.

                     

                     

                    Euphonix MC Control and MC Mix automated digital mixers ensure the  versatility and connectivity we need for a wide range of applications. To enable  broadcast quality production, we utilise the latest recording industry signal  processors for EQ, compression and limiting, in addition to numerous processing  tools to ensure all of our projects reach perfection.

                    • 7. Re: 19:6 clips into a 4:3 project
                      the_wine_snob Level 9
                      I'm in that awful 'learning curve' period at the moment where I want to run before I can walk.

                       

                      Craig,

                       

                      This seems to be a major part of "human nature." Most of us experience it often - "hey, how had can it be to hook up that new DVR?" Even though I am an avowed "manual reader," I often just fire that sucka' up and have a go at it, regardless of what that sucka' is. Just like the baby, attempting to run too soon, there will be stumbles.

                       

                      Our main purpose here is to help folk up, when there are stumbles, dust them off, and point them in the right direction. Usually, it works that way.

                       

                      Having the background in Audio is helpful. You have a real leg-up on many, who are both new to computers and to dealing with streams of data, like Audio. Yes, there are differences in the streams, more aspects like CODEC's that differ for Video, from Audio, but you have the basic knowledge. You just need to fill in the blanks for that other data stream. They work the same, but with different tools (gotta' learn those, just like you did with Audio), and some different considerations. Piece-o-cake!

                       

                      Good luck with your progress and also with your operation. I've worked in some pretty large markets, but never in LA, NYC or Chicago. I understand being able to do things, and offer services locally, rather than having the client call in the "big-boys," from NYC (or London in your case). Much to be said for local.

                       

                      Let us know when we can help,

                       

                      Hunt

                      • 8. Re: 19:6 clips into a 4:3 project
                        Craig in Egypt Level 1

                         

                         

                         

                        Hey Bill.


                        That's a lovely philosophy you have there :-)

                         

                        The problem we have here in Egypt is that there are few people like yourself, whom one can turn to in order to share ideas and get support from - simply because there are few other users of applications like this...and certainly none where we are! As you have been so kind in offering me your assistance, when you have the time, perhaps you could share for me (and no doubt countless others who are just finding their feet and will have similar queries) your thoughts and wisdom on these common newbie areas for concern?


                        1. In      order to produce high quality videos for the web or perhaps a DVD for an      in house TV channel in a shopping mall, what significant functionality will we miss by only having Adobe Elements and not Pro? Can we      realistically expect to be able to produce small commercial projects that      will stand up in terms of quality with this application or will we always be making compromises?

                        2. In      terms of hardware: I have a high spec PC with plenty of RAM and an Nvidea      GT9400 video card. (2.6Ghz processor and 2.5 GB RAM.) What general improvements could      be made to this set up in order to make my video production process smoother?      My system still jitters at times and seems to slow when processing larger      clips – during background rendering mainly.

                        3. I      notice that many of the PAL clips I have bought from stock libraries (in      order to get started before I start shooting my own) are of varying      quality and logically the HD videos are of far better quality than the      standard. Therefore should we be aiming where possible to stay in the HD      domain? Either at 16:9 or 4:3 for PAL depending on the project settings you      are working to.

                        4. I've      just started experimenting with TITLES in Pr8. There are some great      effects and one can achieve some fairly pro looking results. However I      have noticed that the resolution of the text and some of the backgrounds are      a little lacking in definition. Is this an issue with my screen resolution      or is there anything we can do to sharpen these? I guess my concern is      that if they lack clarity in Pr8, then by the time they end up in a .FLV      file for a website production – they may look even worse.?

                        5. I      have a background as a sound engineer as you know – so I understand about      writing music for picture and working with the film. Can you tell us the      best way in Video production to work? Should we build our video first then      add the music to this? Should we record our voice over first and sync our      video to this and then add the music later? Is there no fixed way of      working? Is it s all dependant on the type of project you are working on      and how many music and voice over cues there are to hit?


                        Bill. Any help will be greatly appreciated and of course – this is not urgent. If and when you have time will be great.

                         

                        PS - is this you? http://whunt.com/


                        Best

                        Craig.  

                        • 9. Re: 19:6 clips into a 4:3 project
                          nealeh Level 5

                          Craig in Egypt wrote:


                          I've just started experimenting with TITLES in Pr8. There are some great effects and one can achieve some fairly pro looking results. However I have noticed that the resolution of the text and some of the backgrounds are a little lacking in definition. Is this an issue with my screen resolution or is there anything we can do to sharpen these?

                          If you are commenting on how the titles appear on your monitor (rather than a TV) there are a few things to think about:

                           

                          Native Resolution

                           

                          An LCD screen is made up of hundreds of thousands of pixels, each of which illuminates a single position on the screen. Native resolution represents the actual number of those pixels. Anything else and the graphics card has to interpolate the image to fit the monitor - this will always mean that you are viewing at what the graphics card interpolates rather than what you create. For example my monitor has a native resolution of 1920 x 1200 so that is what I set in Windows as my wanted resolution. You can find out your native resolution in it's manual, or it's control settings (the buttons on the monitor) or in Windows Display Settings.

                           

                          Rendering:

                           

                          Have you rendered to get the best preview in PRE (if you have any red bars above your timeline then a) make sure the Work Area Bar covers the whole of your timeline and b) press enter.

                           

                          PRE monitor setting:

                           

                          So you should now have your system settings exactly sending the correct numbers of pixels to your screen and you've rendered for the best possible previews. You now need to set the PRE monitor to display correctly. Click on a clip in your time/sceneline so it appears in the PRE monitor window. Right-Click in the monitor window and set magnification to 100%. Anything else and PRE has to scale your display to fit the set magnification.

                           

                          Let us know how you got on and, if there's no improvement, post back.

                           

                          Cheers,
                          --
                          Neale
                          Insanity is hereditary, you get it from your children

                          • 10. Re: 19:6 clips into a 4:3 project
                            the_wine_snob Level 9

                            Craig,

                             

                            Thank you for the kind words.

                             

                            Now for your questions:

                             

                            In order to produce high quality videos for the web or perhaps a DVD for an in house TV channel in a shopping mall, what significant functionality will we miss by only having Adobe Elements and not Pro? Can we realistically expect to be able to produce small commercial projects that will stand up in terms of quality with this application or will we always be making compromises?

                             

                            If your output is going to be to DVD-Video (the more demanding of the two examples above, and the one requiring additional work - authoring), let's take that. The differences between PrE and PrPro will mainly be in one's workflow. One benefit of Pro is that one can work with Sequences. Think of these as mini-Projects within a "master" Project. I use my Sequences to edit by "scene," or "Chapters." This allows me to do "modules" of the total Project. I personally find the Effects Control Panel, especially its mini-Timeline, to be easier to work with, when Keyframing animations. I also like the layout of the Audio and Video Tracks better, as I do my Video first, and then address my Audio. There are more included Effects (both Audio and Video) in Pro, and some of them are very useful. There are more included Transitions, but I hardly ever use anything except a butt-cut, Dip-to-Black and Cross-Dissolve. Pro will let me edit and Export DD 5.1 SS AC3 Audio via the SurCode DD 5.1 SS plug-in (~US$250).

                             

                            More operations in Pro are fully manual, while PrE automates many more with Presets, and similar. Pro offers more levels of control, but the user must fill in dialog boxes, drag sliders, etc., while PrE allows one to push a button, and then choose a Preset. Power and control vs ease of operation.

                             

                            PrE will allow you to directly author to DVD-Video, while Pro requires the use of Adobe Encore, which is bundled with PrPro. However, Encore is a full-featured authoring app., and has so many more features, than the authoring module in PrE. One must do things manually in Encore, while PrE does its thing in a semi-automatic mode. For the casual user, PrE does about all that they are likely to want, and makes it easy. Encore has far more power, but one does it manually, one step at a time. All Menus must be manually added (many Templates included, and it is far easier to create them for Encore, than for PrE, due to that semi-automatic functionality), and all Links must be done by hand. Nothing in the assembly of a Project is done automatically.

                             

                            Pro has a larger footprint, than PrE, but it contains more, like those Effects. The "horsepower" requirements seem about the same, but then Pro can handle larger Projects, so in the end, probably will require more power, as one usually begins to do larger Projects. With proper hardware and setup, CS4.2 seems a bit more stable, than PrE 8, but that is only an "impression" from reading others' posts.

                             

                            Pro uses a stand-alone organizer, Bridge/Media Browser, while PrE has this built in. Pro's organizer is more manual, but the automatic/semi-automatic organizer in PrE seems to be somewhat problematic.

                             

                            Looking back over my answer, I think that I can distill it to a line from the second paragraph, Pro = power and control vs PrE's ease of use.

                             

                            On to question 2,

                             

                            Hunt

                            • 11. Re: 19:6 clips into a 4:3 project
                              the_wine_snob Level 9
                              In terms of hardware: I have a high spec PC with plenty of RAM and an nVidia GT9400 video card. (2.6Ghz processor and 2.5 GB RAM.) What general improvements could be made to this set up in order to make my video production process smoother? My system still jitters at times and seems to slow when processing larger clips – during background rendering mainly.

                               

                              How many cores in your CPU. If it's a Quad-core @ 2.6GHz, that is good. If it's a Duo-core, you could be better. If you are on a 32-bit OS, I'd fill the RAM slots to 4GB, even though you can directly use only ~3.5GB. If you have a 64-bit OS, then I'd be looking at ~ 12GB RAM. The nVidia card is fine. Just keep the drivers updated. Now, when it comes to playback (and also other operations), the I/O sub-system is most often the bottleneck. I recommend a minimum of 3 physical HDD's, with the fastest controller possible. The minimum would be allocated like this:

                               

                              C:\ does not have to be THAT large, but should be as fast as is possible and ideally SATA II. This would be used for the OS, programs and probably the Page File ONLY.

                               

                              D:\ large and fast, but not necessarily as fast as the C:\, though it must be at least 72K RPM. This disk would be used for the Project and Scratch Disks.

                               

                              E:\ large and fast (just like D:\). This disk would be used for the media files.

                               

                              If one wishes to kick it up a notch, then:

                               

                              F:\ large and fast (just like D:\). This disk would be used for Export of files.

                               

                              Next notch up would be to do a separate hardware RAID controller and at least E:\ and F:\ would be a RAID _0 (depending on the number of physical HDD's in the array, that could be RAID 0, or maybe RAID 50. One could also do a redundant array for D:\ to provide security too.

                               

                              Note the word "physical" above. This means NO partitions, only physical HDD's.

                               

                              Now, if one is doing CPU-intensive work, i.e. Transcoding, or editing with AVCHD (these use the CPU more than the I/O sub-system), then a fast Quad-core will benefit and the latest i7 even more. For playback, it's mostly I/O, and with AVCHD and Transcoding, mostly CPU.

                               

                              More to come,

                               

                              Hunt

                              • 12. Re: 19:6 clips into a 4:3 project
                                the_wine_snob Level 9
                                I notice that many of the PAL clips I have bought from stock libraries (in order to get started before I start shooting my own) are of varying quality and logically the HD videos are of far better quality than the standard. Therefore should we be aiming where possible to stay in the HD domain? Either at 16:9 or 4:3 for PAL depending on the project settings you are working to.

                                 

                                If you will be moving to HD, then I would look to acquire HD stock Assets. There is a bit of work getting HD down to SD, but then you will have the HD versions, when you need them. Little is worse than buying a stock catalog for some Web work, only to discover that the images are horrible when one goes to print - those stock Assets cannot be effectively used beyond the Web. SD Assets, scaled up to HD will look very bad.

                                 

                                Now, back to question #1 for a moment. Jeff Bellune has done a TUTORIAL on HD to SD, that applies directly to CS4.2. If you buy HD stock, you might want to consider Jeff's suggestions.

                                 

                                More to come,

                                 

                                Hunt

                                • 13. Re: 19:6 clips into a 4:3 project
                                  the_wine_snob Level 9
                                  I've just started experimenting with TITLES in Pr8. There are some great effects and one can achieve some fairly pro looking results. However I have noticed that the resolution of the text and some of the backgrounds are a little lacking in definition. Is this an issue with my screen resolution or is there anything we can do to sharpen these? I guess my concern is that if they lack clarity in Pr8, then by the time they end up in a .FLV file for a website production – they may look even worse.?

                                   

                                  The Titler in PrE 8 is very nice. The Titler in Pro is even better. It has more control on the Styles applied to Text and Objects in the Title. It has one neat little feature - a button to allow one to create a New Title Based on Existing Title (the one open in Titler). This is much easier than saving a Title as a Template, though you can do that too.

                                   

                                  As far as the clarity of the Text, it's tough to judge the resultant quality in either PrE, or Pro. The best that one can do is change the Magnification from Fit to 100%, and the Quality to Highest (Pro only). Now, Pro makes it pretty easy to display the Program Monitor on a calibrated NTSC/PAL CRT monitor, through a D-A device via FireWire. I think that PrE can do that too, but am not sure, nor sure how easy it would be. The next best test is to burn a DVD RW, and play that on a set-top player, hooked to a TV.

                                   

                                  Now, I do many of my Titles in PS and Import them as .PSD's. I have more control, but it does mean doing the work in another program. Also, if one needs to edit, Titler will not work, so you're back in PS, and need to Import the changed version to manually replace the previous version.

                                   

                                  Also, this ARTICLE will give you more tips for Titles. There were two other great articles that I had bookmarked, but both are dead now.

                                   

                                  My general tips are: use a bold, or black san-serif font of an adequate size. If your going to DVD-Video, a tiny bit of Vertical Blur can actually be beneficial, especially if the edges or horizontal elements "shimmer." Thin, or decorative fonts usually look horrible on Video, and all sorts of issues can crop up. For NTSC, I choose colors that are within the gamut, about 15 to 236, omitting deep blacks and super-whites. PAL handles darker blacks and whiter whites better, so a gamut from 0 to 255 is not a big deal there. I also use drop-shadows and glows to visually separate type from backgrounds.

                                   

                                  I also find that animating Titles in Pro is much easier, though everything is by hand. PrE offers some animation Presets, that are easy to apply, and provide some control, however Pro offers an easier ultimate control - for everything else, there's Adobe AfterEffects.

                                   

                                  One more to go,

                                   

                                  Hunt

                                  • 14. Re: 19:6 clips into a 4:3 project
                                    the_wine_snob Level 9
                                    I have a background as a sound engineer as you know – so I understand about writing music for picture and working with the film. Can you tell us the best way in Video production to work? Should we build our video first then add the music to this? Should we record our voice over first and sync our video to this and then add the music later? Is there no fixed way of working? Is it s all dependant on the type of project you are working on and how many music and voice over cues there are to hit?

                                     

                                    The Project will need to dictate the workflow. Normally, I do the Video editing, until pretty tight, before I do the narration, or the music. For the latter, I will do this at the end of the Project. One reason for this workflow is that I often use Sonicfire Pro to do my scoring. I will Export a reference file, and Import that into Sonicfire Pro, and score to that.

                                     

                                    Now, if one is doing a music video, then things would be reversed. Same if the narration is say a story, testimonial or poem. That wold be laid down first, and then the Video editing would be done around that. To me, this sort of Project would have to be done backwards, from my normal workflow.

                                     

                                    Now, with the latter, Pro allows one to easily Lock Tracks, so that cuts on say the Video and muxed Audio do NOT affect the Music, or Narration Track. This is very, very useful and I wish that PrE would add Track Locking.

                                     

                                    Remember, all of these are my personal observations, preferences and choices. YMMV. Others might feel very strongly against my recs.

                                     

                                    Hope that this gives you something to think about, and good luck,

                                     

                                    Hunt

                                    • 15. Re: 19:6 clips into a 4:3 project
                                      Craig in Egypt Level 1

                                      Oh what to say..I am speechless at the speed of your responses and the amount of valuable and usable information you have given me in the space of 2 hours.

                                       

                                      I shall print all of these and try to absorb it all and then make any appropriate changes and try not to post anything else until I have done so!. I did check the monitor resolution and it is 1440x900 which corresponds to what Windows has for it's resoloution, so I guess that is OK. Within PrE, when I make magnification to 100% the clip increases in size to such an extent that it will not fit onto the screen and as such the resolution is terrible. When I put it back to "Fit" it goes back to a good resolution and in actual fact, using better fonts and playing with the titles, looks better than the initial experiements I did yesterday. So for now, I am happy.

                                       

                                      This raises a real newbie question in my mind however: The smaller the magnification - the better the clips look. What happens to this process when you burn the project to a DVD and play it on a 32" TV? I haven't got that far yet but I'm hoping there's a process that handles this so that it's viewable.

                                       

                                      Thanks again gentlemen.

                                       

                                      Happy of Egypt.

                                       

                                      Craig

                                      • 16. Re: 19:6 clips into a 4:3 project
                                        the_wine_snob Level 9

                                        Craig,

                                         

                                        For testing the Titles (and other things) as well as can be done with the emulation preview in the Program Monitor, just ignore all other Panels and panes for a moment, and just drag your Program Monitor until the image is full (or scroll around the Program Monitor to see the areas of greatest interest - think you can scroll the Program Monitor's display in PrE?). [Edit] Yes, when you exceed the size of the Program Monitor, you get scroll bars for the X and Y axis.Then, when you're done with your testing, just drag it back to show the other Panes and Panels. In Pro, I'd do a Custom Workspace with the Program Monitor at full size. Matter of fact, that is one of my Custom Workspaces on my dual-monitor setup on the workstation. I have other Panels, like Project and Titler, tiled, and just click one each to bring them to the "front," and give them focus. Obviously, each is slightly smaller than the full 21" of that second monitor's size, so I can see the edges of each Panel.

                                         

                                        Good luck, and hope that this helps,

                                         

                                        Hunt

                                         

                                        Message was edited by: Bill Hunt - Added [Edit] and scroll bar info.

                                        • 17. Re: 19:6 clips into a 4:3 project
                                          nealeh Level 5

                                          No matter what you do in PRE, when you create a DVD your footage is compressed to:

                                           

                                          a) fit on a DVD (4.7GB or 8.5GB).

                                          b) and, in PAL land, 720x576 pixels.

                                           

                                          The simplest answer to your question about 'how will it look' is to burn one to a rewritable DVD and play it. There are so many factors at work in the process that there can be no single answer.

                                           

                                          My personal workflow is to let PRE burn to a folder for a dual-layer 8.5GB and then use DVD-Shrink (1) if I want to make it fit on a single layer or rewritable DVD.

                                           

                                          Your point about 'using fit' makes the image sharper is generic for most image viewing. Scan a photo at a high setting and it will not fit your display. Zoom into it and it will appear blurred as you get to fewer and fewer pixels displaying. Zoom out and the image appears sharper and sharper. I'm sure there must be a technical or medical term to describe this effect (but I don't know it).

                                           

                                          Cheers,
                                          --
                                          Neale
                                          Insanity is hereditary, you get it from your children

                                           

                                          PS: (1) - use the link I have given you - there is some other web site that charges for something they call "DVD Shrink 2010". DVD-Shrink 3.2.0.15 is freeware.

                                          • 18. Re: 19:6 clips into a 4:3 project
                                            nealeh Level 5

                                            the_wine_snob wrote:

                                            For testing the Titles (and other things) as well as can be done with the emulation preview in the Program Monitor, just ignore all other Panels and panes for a moment, and just drag your Program Monitor until the image is full (or scroll around the Program Monitor to see the areas of greatest interest - think you can scroll the Program Monitor's display in PrE?). [Edit] Yes, when you exceed the size of the Program Monitor, you get scroll bars for the X and Y axis.

                                            I use a different strategy to achieve the same effect (like everything in life there is always more than one way to do something).

                                             

                                            Turn on the docking headers (Window> Show Docking Headers). Each pane now has a heading. You can now undock the monitor (by dragging its title bar) to become a floating window and resize as you would any other window (although sadly the header does not have a maximise icon). When you're done use Window> Restore Workspace to put everything back.

                                             

                                            Cheers,
                                            --
                                            Neale
                                            Insanity is hereditary, you get it from your children

                                            • 19. Re: 19:6 clips into a 4:3 project
                                              the_wine_snob Level 9

                                              Neale,

                                               

                                              Nice tip. I've never used my PrE on my dual-monitor workstation, so just grab and drag on the laptop. In Pro, I have a dozen specialized dual-monitor Workspaces, and just grab the one that I need for that operation, like double-wide Timeline, or Audio editing, then switch back, when I go to another operation.

                                               

                                              Thanks,

                                               

                                              Hunt

                                              • 20. Re: 19:6 clips into a 4:3 project
                                                Craig in Egypt Level 1

                                                Hi Guys

                                                 

                                                So we are back on line with some new hard drives, 4GB RAM and new configurations for projects/media locations etc. Not noticing too much difference in the PC so far but I guess time will tell.

                                                 

                                                One workflow issue that IS driving me mad at this time and perhaps somebody can tell me where I am going wrong? Generally speaking - I am doing 60 seconds editing of audio/narration/video and then waiting some 5+ minutes for the project to render. Completely losing my thread while I wait for this to be processed. Is this just part and parcel of the world of video editing?

                                                 

                                                Thanks

                                                 

                                                Craig

                                                • 21. Re: 19:6 clips into a 4:3 project
                                                  nealeh Level 5

                                                  You can turn it off. See this article in the FAQ: "How can I turn off background features in Premiere Elements 8?"

                                                   

                                                  Cheers,
                                                  --
                                                  Neale
                                                  Insanity is hereditary, you get it from your children

                                                  • 22. Re: 19:6 clips into a 4:3 project
                                                    the_wine_snob Level 9

                                                    Craig,

                                                     

                                                    Do you mean Render, or do you mean Export/Share? Rendering is necessary ONLY where you need to get the smoothest playback, and has nothing to do with the Export/Share end of things. I will do entire Projects and never Render once. Now, a bit of that depends on one's source footage. For me, with DV-AVI Type II's, the only time that I will Render is for small sections, where I have done Keyframe animation, and need to see the best possible playback to decide if I like what I have done.

                                                     

                                                    Now, Export/Share time is highly CPU dependent, with the I/O (HDD's) bringing up the rear. The only way to really enhance that speed is to go with a much faster CPU (or in the case of H.264, a special GPU video card w/ the necessary capabilities and utilities for CUDA processing - not for PrE yet).

                                                     

                                                    If you only need smooth playback for a portion of your Timeline, use the WAB (Work Area Bar) to limit the Render to just what you need.

                                                     

                                                    Good luck, and hope that this helps,

                                                     

                                                    Hunt

                                                    • 23. Re: 19:6 clips into a 4:3 project
                                                      Craig in Egypt Level 1

                                                      Good day gentlemen! and thanks for your responses.

                                                       

                                                      The problem has been with rendering for smooth playback and indeed I found today how to limit the rendering to just a section of the workflow, so that helped considerably. I am working on PAL clips at the moment in various formats as they were from a stock library. Some need rendering after changes and some don't. I have noticed that changes to Titles take a log time to render. I have turned off background rendering as that was becoming painful to work with and only render when I really need to as the system was crashing when the render was in excess of 500+ frames.

                                                       

                                                      Bill - are you telling me that I should have clips in the DV-AVI Type II format and this will reduce my need for constant rendering?

                                                       

                                                      Of course - if I made an edit correctly and only once, then I would be saving time but this will come with experience I guess! ;-)

                                                       

                                                      Thanks again,

                                                       

                                                      Craig

                                                      • 24. Re: 19:6 clips into a 4:3 project
                                                        the_wine_snob Level 9

                                                        Craig,

                                                         

                                                        For SD Projects, DV-AVI Type II's are "as good as it gets." They will Import with no need to Render for smooth playback. Now, if you add an Effect, or an overlay Title, or a PiP, you will have changed that Clip, and for the smoothest playback, you'll need to Render. Same for Transitions, but you'd only have to Render just those. Still, when one has Imported DV-AVI Type II AV files, the vast majority of the Clips will play just fine, even if they also have that red line over them. As I mentioned, I do many complete Projects and never Render. Now, there are times, where I am doing heavy animation, and will often Render a small piece many, many times, until I know that I have exactly what I want.

                                                         

                                                        With mixed Assets, I always convert to DV-AVI Type II's w/ 48KHz 16-bit PCM/WAV Audio, outside of my NLE program. I use a shareware converter, that works fine for my and does batch conversion. I load it up (even with mixed Assets), check my settings and hit Convert. I'll go log-in to the forum, or get a cup of coffee, and when I am done, all is ready to be Imported. I recently posted on a Project, where I broke the above rule and it chronicles my suffering. I knew better, but got in a hurry, and paid the price by having to basically go back, and "do it correctly." I knew better, so the onus is squarely on me.

                                                         

                                                        Now, with HD Projects, the file formats/specs. for conversions do differ, to match the Project's Presets. I am talking SD, with the mention of the DV-AVI Type II's only.

                                                         

                                                        Hope that helps, and good luck,

                                                         

                                                        Hunt

                                                        • 25. Re: 19:6 clips into a 4:3 project
                                                          Craig in Egypt Level 1

                                                          Thanks Bill. Much appreciated.

                                                           

                                                          So is it better to do a standard batch conversion of all SD media from their native formats to DV-AVI Type II before you begin - using a separate convertor? How does this usually affect the quality of the media - generally speaking?

                                                           

                                                          Can you reccomend a good convertor, if this is the case.

                                                           

                                                          Thanks

                                                           

                                                          Craig

                                                          • 26. Re: 19:6 clips into a 4:3 project
                                                            nealeh Level 5

                                                            This will be helpful: "What tools can I use to convert my video to DV-AVI?"

                                                             

                                                            Cheers,
                                                            --
                                                            Neale
                                                            Insanity is hereditary, you get it from your children

                                                            • 27. Re: 19:6 clips into a 4:3 project
                                                              Craig in Egypt Level 1

                                                              Hey Neale

                                                               

                                                              Thanks for that link. Looks like that's all you need to know for converting!

                                                               

                                                              I already have NCH's Prism convertor so I'll give that a go.

                                                               

                                                              Best from Egypt

                                                               

                                                              Craig

                                                              • 28. Re: 19:6 clips into a 4:3 project
                                                                the_wine_snob Level 9

                                                                Craig,

                                                                 

                                                                DV-AVI Type II is very lightly compressed. It is unlikely that one can tell the differences between the original and the DV-AVI Type II files.

                                                                 

                                                                Neale has given you a link for some conversion utilities. I happen to use DigitalMedia Converter, which is shareware. One feature that I appreciate is the batch conversion. I can load it with mixed source media, check my settings and then just hit Convert. I'll stop by the forum, get a cup of coffee, and when I return, all is done. I believe that some of the linked converters also offer batch conversion, but have not used any of those, as DMC works so well for me. Note: with odd CODEC's, one will need to have those installed, as DMC does not ship/install with any CODEC's of its own.

                                                                 

                                                                Hope that this helps. Two often recommended converters are Prism and MPEGStreamclip. Think Prism is freeware, but do not know about the other.

                                                                 

                                                                Good luck,

                                                                 

                                                                Hunt