9 Replies Latest reply on Feb 11, 2010 10:47 AM by JETalmage

    time saving help!!!

    Robin Berger

      i have a TON of clip art from a cd that i would like to use in indesign. i can not place it in indesign and edit /change color of it. i can open it in ill then drag it to indesign and that is what i am looking to do. However it is very time consuming. i have several folders of diff catagories.

      is there a way to do this quickly? someone please say yes with instructions!! MANY MANY thanks in advance!!!

        • 1. Re: time saving help!!!
          John Mensinger Adobe Community Professional & MVP

          Robin,

           

          Saw your thread in the InDesign forum as well. It will be tough to advise you unless you get more specific about your objective. It's hard to visualize batch-processing a "ton" of clipart without knowing exactly what the "processing' entails. Here you hint that you'd like to change colors, but across an assortment of files, how would a batch process know which colors to select, and change...to which colors?

           

          Ungrouping and editing that clipart, if that's even possible, is a pretty subjective task. A batch operation isn't really applicable.

          • 2. Re: time saving help!!!
            Robin Berger Level 1

            i don't think i am being clear so i will try again.....

            i am not trying to do a batch for changing the colors. i'm trying to to a batch to make the files the format i need to place in indesign and be able to edit there.

            i have folders of clip art .eps from a dvd and it seems the only way to edit them in indesign it to open them in ill then drag into indesign or maybe do a save as ill .eps

            is this clearer????

            thanks!!!!!

            • 3. Re: time saving help!!!
              Scott Falkner Level 5

              There is no format for placing artwork into InDesign that will let you edit the artwork in InDesign. The only way to get Illustrator art into InDesign as editable art is to copy and paste. But there are many features supported in Illustrator that will either paste improperly or paste as very complex and difficult to edit pieces. It is almost always a bad idea to paste Illustrator art into InDeign just to save the need to edit that art in Illustrator.


              The only reason I would suggest this is if the parts need to be used as part of the layout, rather than as a single graphic. By that I mean if you want to use some or all of the art as a text frame or graphic frame or if you will otherwise need to alter the artwork in InDesign.

              • 4. Re: time saving help!!!
                Robin Berger Level 1

                It is almost always a bad idea to paste Illustrator art into InDeign just to save the need to edit that art in Illustrator.

                ???????

                really????? i thought that was one of the pros about creative suite. the whole drag and drop thing.

                Lets say i have an illustration in ill that i want to use for a brochure i'm doing in indesign. once it's placed in there i would like to change the color to say 3 choices for the client and alter it to “frame” the text. does that mean i need to save 3 versions of the .eps files?? that doesn't make sense.

                if i drag and drop or cut and paste i can have 3+pages in indesign to see all the layouts together.....

                • 5. Re: time saving help!!!
                  Scott Falkner Level 5

                  The advantage of leaving the art as an imported graphic is that you can easily divide tasks. When I need to manipulate a graphic in InDesign it’s usually to move or scale it, often with other objects on the page. When I select that object I don’t want a bunch of paths highlighted or anchor points shown — they are distracting and make it harder to see the object in context. I also don’t want to have to click, then move only one part of the graphic, then either notice, undo, switch tools, redo the move, etc.; or worse, not notice and leave the graphic altered without my knowledge.


                  If I expect to use that graphic more than once, I like knowing that there is only one instance of it to edit.


                  Just because you can do almost everything in InDesign is not reason to do so. Ultimately, over time, you will settle into a workflow that works best for you. I have been doing this for a long time and I am very good at it, so I am confident that my advise has merit and is at least worthy of consideration. You do what you think works best and, in the end, you’ll be happy with the processes you choose to follow, rather than those imposed on you by others.

                  • 6. Re: time saving help!!!
                    John Mensinger Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                    i thought that was one of the pros about creative suite. the whole drag and drop thing.

                     

                    No offense, but you're thinking is a bit backward on this. Creative Suite inter-application integration isn't there so that you can use Photoshop or Illustrator as "converters" to usher all your assets into InDesign. On the contrary, the integration is there to keep those tasks properly divided among the applications.

                     

                    After you place your EPS graphic, (using File > Place), in InDesign, invoke the Edit Original command, and the graphic will open for editing in Illustrator; the app that's designed to edit EPS vector graphics. Edit, save, and close the file in Illustrator, and the changes take effect on your InDesign page. If there is more than one placed instance of the graphic in your InDesign document, all instances will update. That is the integrated workflow.

                     

                    Lets say i have an illustration in ill that i want to use for a brochure i'm doing in indesign. once it's placed in there i would like to change the color to say 3 choices for the client and alter it to “frame” the text. does that mean i need to save 3 versions of the .eps files?? that doesn't make sense.

                     

                    As Scott already mentioned, you are, of course, free to dictate the methods within your own workflow, but remember, you're not inventing anything here. Scores of industry professionals have the same options at their disposal, and for very good reasons, almost all invariably choose the placed/linked workflow over an embedded graphics workflow you describe. There are ways...some very elegant ways...to offer the client color and configuration options without resorting to embedding. One quick example is to use InDesign's Object Layer Options capabilities. Save an image or graphic with layers in Photoshop or Illustrator, then place it in InDesign, where you can control the visibility of those individual layers. To offer your client three choices, set them up on three layers in Illustrator and control their visibility in InDesign...so no...not 3 EPS files...one AI file.

                    • 7. Re: time saving help!!!
                      Robin Berger Level 1

                      first off, i really appreciate everyone's help on this forum. i am a freelancer working from home. i just started using indesign3 so this is most helpful.

                      if your have access to lynda.com you can see what i am trying to achieve in the video in indesign3 chapter: graphics. copying and pasting from illustrator. so you disagree with this video?

                       

                      john- no offense taken. i did the layers in ill like you suggested. thank you. great tip  but am still looking to edit and design a little in indesign.


                      i am working on an invitation line  and have decorative elements to use on these.

                       

                      again thank you for all your advice!!!! i really am taking it all into consideration while i try and figure out my workflow......

                      • 8. Re: time saving help!!!
                        John Mensinger Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                        It's not really a matter of agreeing or disagreeing with a particular chapter of a training course. Of course there are times when pasting from AI to ID for in-ID editability's sake is advantageous. I just wouldn't condone it as standard practice. All Adobe products offer multiple ways to do things. In some scenarios, one way is better. In others, another way may hold an advantage. Often, finding ways to use various features in combination is what separates the pro's from amateurs. In any event, stick with the training, keep asking questions, and experiment with every feature you see. Good luck to you.

                        • 9. Re: time saving help!!!
                          JETalmage Level 6

                          Robin,

                           

                          You could:

                           

                          1. Use an Action in Illustrator to batch this process on a folder of .eps files:

                           

                          1.1 Open the EPS.

                          1.2 Save as AI (with PDF Compatibility on).

                           

                          2. Import to InDesign. In InDesign's import dialog, you can select multiple files at once. Either leave the Link checkbox off (causing InD to embedd them), or select the imported objects in the Links palette after importing them and Embed them. They should then be editable within InDesign.

                           

                          Understand: When you place an AI file in InDesign, you are really placing a PDF version that is included in the file, not the native AI stuff.

                           

                          There is nothing technically "wrong" with having spot graphics embedded in InDesgn if that's what you want to do. InDesign has its own Pen tool and LBOs, etc., so it's conceivable to draw vector artwork right there in InDesign. When you embed the PDF content in InD, it's essentially as if you drew the objects in InD.

                           

                          Of course, the more you do this, the larger your InD file becomes. But that may or may not be an issue in your particular case.

                           

                          JET