12 Replies Latest reply on Feb 25, 2010 6:33 AM by the_wine_snob

    Audio and video lost sync on burned DVD

    AlanKl2 Level 1

      On Premiere 4, I created a DVD however the sync was lost by a fraction of a second so lips don't sync with words.  I didn't unlink the video and audio tracks during any of the editing.  Why did this happen and how can I correct it?

        • 1. Re: Audio and video lost sync on burned DVD
          the_wine_snob Level 9

          Please tell us about your source files and your Project. This is not common, so it might take a bit of detective work to find the problem.

           

          I have only encountered this when the original, source media was muxed MPEG files. There was no way to establish perfect sync, in the output DVD. I had to redo the entire Project for the client with converted DV-AVI's, as the MPEG files just kept messing up in the final output.

           

          Good luck,

           

          Hunt

          • 2. Re: Audio and video lost sync on burned DVD
            AdelaidePeter Level 1

            I had similar disappointment this morning after a multi-hour render exercise on a compilation of Main Concept AVIs into a .wmv clip.

            My output had all the video rushing through without waiting for the dialogue at all.

             

            The original clips were captured in Hypercam 3.0 with video and (audio at 48K mono also) selected to Main Concept Adobe 2.

            Unfortunately they had lost sync a little between video & audio in a couple of places - probably around pause/resume points.

            Anyway I had been pretty excited because finally I was getting reliable audio tracks on the second or third get media attempt and

            had found that could splice out pieces of video and alt-drag to the left the later portion to effectively re-sync the sound with the video.

            I selected the whole clip-remnant video portion to drag by clicking in its name and did not use the red half bracket gadgets that only stretch things.

            Result was the whole thing now played in perfect syncronisation with the audio - that is until I created my Windows Media Video 720 P 25 film.

            In the past that has been a high-quality, compact format, slow-rendering, well-sync'ed medium but then I had not temporarilly decouplded video & audio.

            I did have snap enabled and used the alt key when dragging the video portion to fill the video-only gap I'd created.

            I read somewhere that that would institute a temporary decoupling!

             

            Clearly, some sort of editing command is needed to permanently re-couple the audio & video portions before rendering to .wmv (or whatever).

            If anyone knows how to re-knit syncronisation (once clips all preview fine) for output purposes, could they please advise?

             

            Cheers,

            AdelaidePeter

            • 3. Re: Audio and video lost sync on burned DVD
              nealeh Level 5

              After you have finished editing your unlinked audio / video select both tracks (audio and video), right-click, select Link Audio and Video.

               

              The trick is 'how to select both audio and video'. PRE does not in this case comply with the common Windows method of Ctrl-Clicking multiple items. You need to select by Shift Clicking. i.e. select the audio track then press the shift key and click the video track before releasing the shift key.

               

              Cheers,
              --
              Neale
              Insanity is hereditary, you get it from your children

              • 4. Re: Audio and video lost sync on burned DVD
                Steve Grisetti Adobe Community Professional

                As Hunt indicates in the first post, this problem is most often related to your source video -- and most often happens when MPEGs or DVD files are used to create a video.

                 

                The solution, per the FAQs to the right of this forum, is to convert the video to more standardized DV-AVIs before bringing them into your Premiere Elements project.

                 

                What type of camcorder did this video come from and how did you get it into your computer?

                • 5. Re: Audio and video lost sync on burned DVD
                  the_wine_snob Level 9

                  Steve,

                   

                  In Peter's case, it appears to be something called HyperCam 3.0.

                  The original clips were captured in Hypercam 3.0 with video and (audio at 48K mono also) selected to Main Concept Adobe 2.

                  I am not familiar with it, but seems to be video screen capture software. I know nothing about it, and the spec. page is not really clear on the details of the capture. WMV and AVI are mentioned, but could not find complete details.

                   

                  Not sure what the issue would be, without the full details. I'd run the output files from this program (if this is correct) through G-Spot to see what they are, inside the wrapper.

                   

                  It could be that the correct setting in the program would yield better results, or maybe they will need to be converted?

                   

                  Good luck to all,

                   

                  Hunt

                  • 6. Re: Audio and video lost sync on burned DVD
                    Steve Grisetti Adobe Community Professional

                    Let's see what G-Spot tells us, Hunt.

                     

                    But most likely it's using a codec that's outside or Premiere Elements' abilities. A conversion, at the very least, will likely be necessary. But, if he's just looking for some basic editing, it may be that a program like Windows MovieMaker will do what he needs.

                    • 7. Re: Audio and video lost sync on burned DVD
                      Kodebuster Level 3

                      If the OOS (Out-of-Sync) is being seen from multiple VOB files ripped from a single DVD disc, then review this thread for a fix.

                       

                      http://muvipix.com/phpBB3/viewtopic.php?f=38&t=2469

                       

                      Once combined into a single VOB as described, then use Steve's approach as posted to convert to DV-AVI...

                      • 8. Re: Audio and video lost sync on burned DVD
                        AlanKl2 Level 1

                        Well I wound up moving the sound 11 clicks (11/30ths) after the video after unlinking the two.  I didn't unlink it before so I have no idea why they didn't sync the first time.  The original was captured using Premiere 4 of a VHS through a camcorder and I was working with the avi file in Premiere.  I did cut the original very long almost two hour file into various length clips, but I didn't unlink the audio and video until after the problem when I corrected it.  Also, it didn't happen on all clips, only a couple.  There were no mpeg pictures involved.  If I recall, the lack of sync occured on another camcorder movie I did a while back when I first tried the Premiere program but I don't recall the full circumstances nor did I correct the sync.

                         

                        A side question,  The almost two hour video compacted to 4.4 mb on my regular DVD-R but the Premiere says max is around 6.0mb if I was to use a double density disc.  I assume I would get a somewhat better result at 6.0mg with less compression.  Do DVD writers like I have on my Dell burn and read double density discs and do "normal" DVD players handle the double density.  I'm giving these disks to family and I want to make sure they can play it on whatever DVD players they might have.  Thanks again.

                        • 9. Re: Audio and video lost sync on burned DVD
                          AdelaidePeter Level 1

                          Well I am glad you got your movie back in sync.

                          As to the side issue, I am not sure but I think that double density DVDs are the sort you use when you put a movie into a DVD player.

                          However, my hunch is that you need a particularly spec'ed DVD writer to make the double density disks in the first place as a special laser is needed and specialy coated disks too. Check the spec on your unit - online if it is misplaced. If it does not, an external writer unit may cost less than you expect these days. Alternatively a bureau or a mate might write the actual media for you.

                          Good luck,

                          AdelaidePeter

                          • 10. Re: Audio and video lost sync on burned DVD
                            nealeh Level 5

                            AlanKl2 wrote:

                            A side question,  The almost two hour video compacted to 4.4 mb on my regular DVD-R but the Premiere says max is around 6.0mb if I was to use a double density disc.  I assume I would get a somewhat better result at 6.0mg with less compression.  Do DVD writers like I have on my Dell burn and read double density discs and do "normal" DVD players handle the double density.  I'm giving these disks to family and I want to make sure they can play it on whatever DVD players they might have.  Thanks again.

                            The usual terminology is a dual (or double) layer disk. You will need to check the specs of your Dell to see if it is capable of burning dual layer. Even then I've found, with both of my DL writers, that there is far more wastage than with single layer blanks - so I suggest that you use a quality disk such as "Verbatim +R DL".

                             

                            All "normal" DVD players can play dual layer - most commercial disks are dual layer. However they can be sensitive to the recording speed that home DVD's are burnt with. Regardless of the speed my writers and media can provide I always burn at no more than 4x.

                             

                            As you are preparing these disks for your family I highly recommend you to use printable blanks and purchase or borrow a printer capable of printing to a disk - it makes so much difference to the wow factor when you hand them out. I swear by my current printer Canon iP6700D - the best inkjet I've ever owned. It comes with a tray that takes the printable disk and software to prepare and print the image.

                             

                            Cheers,
                            --
                            Neale
                            Insanity is hereditary, you get it from your children

                            • 11. Re: Audio and video lost sync on burned DVD
                              the_wine_snob Level 9
                              I assume I would get a somewhat better result at 6.0mg with less compression.  Do DVD writers like I have on my Dell burn and read double density discs and do "normal" DVD players handle the double density.  I'm giving these disks to family and I want to make sure they can play it on whatever DVD players they might have.

                               

                              If your burner is a true "multi-drive," it will be able to burn DL (DVD-9's). I strongly recommend the Verbatim DVD+R DL's as blank media, and as slow a rated media, as you can find.

                               

                              By the DVD-specs., all DVD players MUST play DL replicated (commercially pressed from a glass master) discs. However, as has been stated before, NO DVD player is required to play ANY burned DVD. Those are not part of the certification program. Most DVD players do play burned DVD's just fine, but some just do not - especially older ones. This goes for the burned DVD DL discs too, and might even be a slightly higher rate of incompatibility, but this incompatibility will depend on the make and model of the particular player. I know of no list for player incompatibility, but there might be one someplace.

                               

                              For more background on the DVD-specs., the bible of what constitutes CD/DVD/BD, see the link in this ARTICLE.

                               

                              I have only had one client, who said that their player could not handle DVD-9's, but I did show him that it would indeed play DVD-9's, so long as they were commercial. Still, for his Project, I broke it into a 16 DVD set, using DVD-5's.

                               

                              Good luck,

                               

                              Hunt

                               

                              [Edit] Hm-m-m, Neale's post was timestamped 2 hrs. before mine, but did not show, until after I posted. Thankfully, I said about the same thing that he did, so at least we have two people with the same feelings. Not sure why his post was not showing, but the forum has been wonky for the last two weeks.

                               

                              Message was edited by: Bill Hunt - Added [Edit]

                              • 12. Re: Audio and video lost sync on burned DVD
                                the_wine_snob Level 9

                                Neale,

                                 

                                I also use the printable Verbatim DVD+R DL discs, and love my Epson R-1900 for printing them. Until recently, the Canons were not available in the US with the DVD/CD/BD printing capabilities. As I heard, there was some law suit filed by Epson, but now I do see other brands of printers on these shores, that can handle the printable media.

                                 

                                As an aside, I use Encore to burn (or the free ImgBurn), and always burn at ~ 2x for my DL's. To date, I've not had one return, and I always use the Verbatims.

                                 

                                Thanks for the post,

                                 

                                Hunt