8 Replies Latest reply on Feb 25, 2010 7:58 AM by the_wine_snob

    Exposure Correction in Premiere Pro

    csc-uk Level 1

      I used a Sony camera model HDR-SR8E to record in AVCHD moonrise and gathering fog after nightfall over a river. This stresses the abilities of the camera regarding exposure with the result that it is very dark to the eye. I was hoping that Premiere Pro would have a tool that can amplify the recorded signals that comprise the video. Thanks.

        • 1. Re: Exposure Correction in Premiere Pro
          Level 4

          Hi,

           

          You might try adjusting " levels " ...see if you can make it better on the timeline.

           

          Rod

          1 person found this helpful
          • 2. Re: Exposure Correction in Premiere Pro
            dradeke Adobe Employee

            There are a lot of approaches and they probably all depend on what the footage looks like.  I would think that the curves

            filter would be your best for balancing shadows and highlights.

             

            Dennis

            1 person found this helpful
            • 3. Re: Exposure Correction in Premiere Pro
              the_wine_snob Level 9

              I agree with the other posters. In very general terms, I usually look to Levels (not Auto), and then Highlight & Shadow (turning OFF the Auto). After those, I look to the Fast Color Corrector, or the Three-way Color Corrector. Note: the order will matter, so do not be afraid to move these Effects around a bit. Also, do not be afraid to go back and tweak previous Effects, after you add some others.

               

              Good luck,

               

              Hunt

              1 person found this helpful
              • 4. Re: Exposure Correction in Premiere Pro
                csc-uk Level 1

                For how the clips look, it looks different depending on the method of play. Played direct from the camera the sky has an area of halo around the moon otherwise it is black, the ground has strong silhouette of things like trees and you can just about make out further details on both the water and among the trees including developing fog because moonlight lights up fog. When imported and played back in PrPro you only see the halo area around the moon and the silhouette of the trees, though later you see some detail on the water, just about. So I think detail is there & that it can be enhanced even though Premiere Pro's playback is degraded.

                 

                Message du 24/02/10 02:57

                De : "dradeke"

                A : "JONES Peter"

                Copie à :

                Objet : Exposure Correction in Premiere Pro

                 

                There are a lot of approaches and they probably all depend on what the footage looks like. I would think that the curves

                filter would be your best for balancing shadows and highlights.

                 

                Dennis

                >

                • 5. Re: Exposure Correction in Premiere Pro
                  the_wine_snob Level 9

                  The playback in PrPro is but an emulation. For true color grading and exposure work, a calibrated CRT monitor fed through a D-A device via FW is the best you can get.

                   

                  From your description, I'd definitely look at Levels, and Highlight & Shadow (be sure to turn Auto OFF). When you have improved things (go back and forth between these two Effects) to a really good point, then look at Fast Color Corrector. Be prepared to go back for tweaking.

                   

                  If you do not have a calibrated monitor, you might want to Export a small segment (or use ADL to Encore), and then burn a DVD RW, or BD RE to test on your set-top player with TV attached. Using rewritables will save $, and no "coasters."

                   

                  Good luck,

                   

                  Hunt

                  • 6. Re: Exposure Correction in Premiere Pro
                    csc-uk Level 1

                    Yes in theory this is all correct, but this bit of video is just background to others, so others will be layered over it later, I have decided I can live with the darkness and move on to the other layers. Thanks.

                     

                    Message du 24/02/10 16:21

                    De : "Bill Hunt"

                    A : "JONES Peter"

                    Copie à :

                    Objet : Exposure Correction in Premiere Pro

                     

                    The playback in PrPro is but an emulation. For true color grading and exposure work, a calibrated CRT monitor fed through a D-A device via FW is the best you can get.

                     

                    From your description, I'd definitely look at Levels, and Highlight & Shadow (be sure to turn Auto OFF). When you have improved things (go back and forth between these two Effects) to a really good point, then look at Fast Color Corrector. Be prepared to go back for tweaking.

                     

                    If you do not have a calibrated monitor, you might want to Export a small segment (or use ADL to Encore), and then burn a DVD RW, or BD RE to test on your set-top player with TV attached. Using rewritables will save $, and no "coasters."

                     

                    Good luck,

                     

                    Hunt

                    >

                    • 7. Re: Exposure Correction in Premiere Pro
                      csc-uk Level 1

                      I could add why I can get away with not correcting exposure after all. I filmed this same scene twice, once after full darkness while moon rose, then a second time with sun setting behind me. I also filmed moon separately on zoom with its own exposure. So while moon is in foreground I use the 1st shot, in this the moon looks like a small white moving spotlight so I put film of the moon proper over it using transparency and rotational and speed effects so the moon always covers the spotlight, then in another project I reversed the second filming so instead of progressively getting darker it gets progressively brighter to full daylight. I figure that in a third project i will just fade the first into the second once the moon has moved out of top view. So the very very dark won't last too long.

                       

                      Message du 24/02/10 16:21

                      De : "Bill Hunt"

                      A : "JONES Peter"

                      Copie à :

                      Objet : Exposure Correction in Premiere Pro

                       

                      The playback in PrPro is but an emulation. For true color grading and exposure work, a calibrated CRT monitor fed through a D-A device via FW is the best you can get.

                       

                      From your description, I'd definitely look at Levels, and Highlight & Shadow (be sure to turn Auto OFF). When you have improved things (go back and forth between these two Effects) to a really good point, then look at Fast Color Corrector. Be prepared to go back for tweaking.

                       

                      If you do not have a calibrated monitor, you might want to Export a small segment (or use ADL to Encore), and then burn a DVD RW, or BD RE to test on your set-top player with TV attached. Using rewritables will save $, and no "coasters."

                       

                      Good luck,

                       

                      Hunt

                      >

                      • 8. Re: Exposure Correction in Premiere Pro
                        the_wine_snob Level 9

                        I'm not sure how this might (or might not) figure into your workflow, but Levels is not readily Keyframable. However, one can duplicate the Clip, apply Levels to that, and then Keyframe the Opacity of that dupe Clip. I believe that RGB Curves IS Keyframable, but I'll need to check that out. This will allow one to Keyframe the Effect of lightening, or darkening the Clip.

                         

                        Good luck,

                         

                        Hunt