7 Replies Latest reply on Mar 18, 2010 9:43 AM by dilalio

    Mimic Photoshop's Bevel & Emboss layer style in Illustrator - how?

    dilalio

      Having searched for topics akin to my question, I have only really found tips on how to achieve a bevel and emboss on type.

       

      Here's what I'm trying to create... all using CS4...

       

      I have an artwork, all in Illustrator so far. It has background images of people (as cut-outs), imported from Photoshop, with layer masks, saved as PSD's, to preserve transparency around the figures, which allows me to compose them over each other and other various component graphics, resident in the Illustrator document. This helps me keep all the graphical elements fully editable in the design/layout as only the people come from Photoshop.

       

      The design has been finalised with the addition of a bevel and emboss layer effect, to the whole bounding box area of the design. I.e. the complete 900 x 700 pixel area is affected by the bevel and emboss - all the various underlying pixels of photoshop elements and Illustrator elements.

       

      So far, I have only been able to achieve this by taking the whole thing back into Photoshop, as a single layer and then applying the Bevel&Emboss layer style effect!

       

      Is there a way to keep this all in Illustrator?

      It seems daft to have to go back into Photoshop just for the B&E effect... and a little dangerous, in case this step gets overlooked in the future!

       

      My current thoughts involve a couple of shaped blends with a screen and multiply overlay setting for the light and shaded edges... but this is just my mind clicking!

       

      Would love to know if this can be achieved in Illy.

        • 1. Re: Mimic Photoshop's Bevel & Emboss layer style in Illustrator - how?
          Wade_Zimmerman Level 6

          Can we see a screen shot of what you have in Photoshop.

           

          In Illustrator yu can target a lyer by clicking on the circle in the layers panel to the right of the layers name.

           

          Using the bevel and extrude effect and giving the rotation settings all 0 select a bevel type and a height give the effect of a bevel it takes a little experimenttion to get what you want.

           

          It will effect anything on that layer.

           

          It might not be what you want.

          • 2. Re: Mimic Photoshop's Bevel & Emboss layer style in Illustrator - how?
            dilalio Level 1

            Firstly, hope replying to the email was the right way to get you this?

             

            Just to clarify... my Illustrator file has many layers and I want the

            bevel and emboss to effect them all... I only flattened the layers

            when moving into Photoshop, to get the effect to apply to the whole

            design, as Photoshop is only being used for this last effect!

            In the future, it would be much easier if I could leave the B&E effect

            resident in Illustrator and could swap and change the rest of the

            design (i.e. new people/figures) as required by the client for Ad-apts.

             

            Here's a screen shot of the B&E effect, applied to the whole design,

            as a layer style, in Photoshop...

             

            Picture 11.png

            • 3. Re: Mimic Photoshop's Bevel & Emboss layer style in Illustrator - how?
              Wade_Zimmerman Level 6

              You can do it a couple of ways that I can think of the first being to select all the art and make it a symbol.

               

              Then create a rectangle path that covers the whole page for the website do the bevel as described above but only to the rectangle path
              then while in the 3D Bevel and extrude effect choose Map Art then when in the art mapping interface select the surface you need then the symbol you made from the art and map the symbol to that surface you can also choose to give the object invisible geometry and to shade the art work.

               

              The second way is to draw two el shape paths with a stroke outline the stroke and give it two fills give each fill a gradient fill then select the gradient tool and condense the gradient to span the outlined stroke and orient one left and right and the other up and down. then copy and reverse and change the black to white in the gradient. you also go from 100% to 0% opacity for the gradient fills.

               

              You could probably just make a stroke rectangle path and outline that stroke and give it four gradient fills two black to transparent and two white to transparent.

               

              Screen shot 2010-03-15 at 10.45.45 AM.png

              1 person found this helpful
              • 4. Re: Mimic Photoshop's Bevel & Emboss layer style in Illustrator - how?
                dilalio Level 1

                Out of curiosity... and to better understand what Illustrator can do, I'd like to try both of your methods.

                However, I'm a little lost with your explanation of the second method...

                 

                Can you expand on giving the "L" shaped path (that has been outlined): two fills?

                Or the rectangle that has been outlined: four fills?

                 

                How do you give a shape more than one fill, gradient or otherwise?

                And how do you deal with the light and dark intersections of the two grad styles (as appears in the bottom left and top right corners), did the 45° meeting point just happen or do you have to alter the geometry?

                 

                Any chance I could have the .ai file to pull apart?

                 

                Another method I found myself, after some experimenting is as follows...

                Picture 12.png

                1. Dotted white line = page/design bounds.
                2. Give 'Shape A' a white drop shadow (Effect > Stylise > Drop shadow) with a "screen" mode and positive values for X and Y offset. This gives a light shadow below and to the right.
                3. Make 'Shape B' a Clipping Mask for 'Shape A' - this leaves nothing but the drop shadow showing.
                4. Give 'Shape D' a black drop shadow (Effect > Stylise > Drop shadow) with a "multiply" mode and negative values for X and Y offset. This gives a dark shadow above and to the left.
                5. Make 'Shape C' a Clipping Mask for 'Shape D' - this leaves nothing but the drop shadow showing.

                 

                Here's the result...

                Picture 15.png

                Put the new geometry (light and dark bevel shapes) on a layer at the top and, hey presto, they'll influence anything on levels below.

                Only downside of this method is that the drop shadows can take a while to render, each time they are adjusted, so it's worth turning them off (or hiding their layer) while working on other areas of the design.

                 

                Also, with all of these methods, you don't get quite the same intersections at the bottom left and top right corners, as you do with the bevel and emboss layer style/effect in Photoshop... but that's being really picky!

                 

                Thanks for helping with this and hope it helps others.

                 

                Still want to work through your methods though.

                • 5. Re: Mimic Photoshop's Bevel & Emboss layer style in Illustrator - how?
                  Wade_Zimmerman Level 6

                  Perhaps the video will explain how easy it is

                   

                  http://mysite.verizon.net/wzphoto/LGradient.mov

                   

                  I think both methods are fine.

                  1 person found this helpful
                  • 6. Re: Mimic Photoshop's Bevel & Emboss layer style in Illustrator - how?
                    dilalio Level 1

                    It certainly does!

                     

                    Makes it more personal as well... thanks for putting that together for me. The additional fill feature is something I didn't know Illustrator could do... love that, can think of lots of ways to use it.

                     

                    I like your method because it creates less geometry and you can see everything on display (no hidden linework), then again, I suppose my method means you can easily tweak the strength of the shading to suit the underlying art, so that's a plus on that front.

                     

                    Yes, both methods are fine in my opinion too.

                     

                    Thanks very much for picking this up and making the effort to assist me.

                     

                    BTW: what app do you use to create the video tutorial?

                     

                    Rgds,

                    Dean.

                    • 7. Re: Mimic Photoshop's Bevel & Emboss layer style in Illustrator - how?
                      dilalio Level 1

                      Use either geometry with multiple gradient fills or geometry in the shape of bevels to mask drop shadow effects.

                       

                      See thread for full details.