3 Replies Latest reply on Mar 18, 2010 12:00 PM by the_wine_snob

    Motion JPEG Codec

    sat042677

      Attempting to import and edit avi video clips that are in the MJPEG Codec (according to GSpot and the person who sent me the avi video clips) . I installed Mainconcepts MJPEG Codec and now the MJPEG avi's finally play correctly in the Premiere CS4 timeline if I choose the preset "sequence" Sony EX-HQ 30fps at 1080p Par no fields square pixels 1.0  1920 x 1080p 16:9...I not do not get a redline above the clip in the timeline if I use that particular Sony preset sequence. Or if I use the preset sequence AVCHD with similar settings 1080p 

       

      Question:

      How do I know if I'm choosing the correct preset sequence before editing my project if I do not know what type of camera filmed the avi's? (the person who filmed these avi's for me doesn't think it matter's what type of camera filmed the footage although I told them I needed to know in order to edit it in Premiere Pro CS4)  Would I be ok editing these MJPEG codec avi's with either of the two sequence presets that already seem to work? I'm having a hard time matching up the correct type of sequence preset to use with this footage? I just want to get a good final product to burn to DVD. These avi's do indeed look like HD.

       

      I do know the videographer claims the avi clips were recorded in 1080p using the MJPEG-HD codec...(supposedly with an HD camera)..although the signal must have been converted to digital HD because my understanding is that the Motion JPEG codec comes from an analog signal.

       

      Thanks for any advice

       

      Stewart

      Richmond, Virginia

        • 1. Re: Motion JPEG Codec
          the_wine_snob Level 9

          Stewart,

           

          Glad that the MainConcept MJPEG CODEC is working for you.

           

          Since you do not have AVCHD footage, do not choose one of those. Instead, look at the rest of the G-Spot screen and choose a Preset that matches 100%. If there is not one, then choose Desktop and customize the attributes to match what G-Spot told you.

           

          Once edited, you can Export to what you need.

           

          Good luck,

           

          Hunt

          • 2. Re: Motion JPEG Codec
            Stan Jones Adobe Community Professional & MVP

            (the person who filmed these avi's for me doesn't think it matter's what type of camera filmed the footage although I told them I needed to know in order to edit it in Premiere Pro CS4)

             

             

            It can help, but many of the mjpeg avis are coming from cameras where it does not help so much.  As Bill says, you need to get as much info as you can about the file (Gspot it), then find/create a proper sequence.

             

            the signal must have been converted to digital HD because my understanding is that the Motion JPEG codec comes from an analog signal.

            Mjpeg was a popular format several years ago, and often used then for analog conversion.  But it is being used in many still cameras/helmet cams etc.

            • 3. Re: Motion JPEG Codec
              the_wine_snob Level 9
              it is being used in many still cameras/helmet cams etc.

               

              Yes, in the last 18 mos., it has had a major rebirth, especially with the newer Nikon DSLR's that record video too.

               

              It is a far better CODEC for the helmet cams, than that damned Xvid, that some use. MJPEG is usually fine to edit, with the proper CODEC, while Xvid is NOT editable without conversion, and then the quality is horrible. That "stuff" is only meant to be viewed in a streaming environment and NOT edited.

               

              Hunt