12 Replies Latest reply on Apr 4, 2010 3:41 PM by the_wine_snob

    What is the best way to handle .mod files in premiere pro cs4?

    Lucas.117

      I recently got a JVC Everio GZ-MG130u and as I'm sure many of you are aware, it saves footage in the .mod format.

       

      I have googled this and found quite a few different solutions, but I'm just wondering if anything has changed since some of these solutions were posted, or in other words, what is the best way at this current point in time to handle .mod files in premiere pro cs4?

       

      As far as I know, the best thing to do is convert the .mod to .avi and then import it into premiere so it can be edited.. Is there a better way to do it than this? Also, by doing it this way, will I have separate audio and video tracks?

       

      Thanks.

        • 1. Re: What is the best way to handle .mod files in premiere pro cs4?
          the_wine_snob Level 9

          Lucus,

           

          Welcome to the forum.

           

          I used to refer people to a THREAD, on conversion methods for MOD files. In the Premiere Elements forum, a representative from JVC, has replied in several threads, the PrE 8 now handles MOD files natively. I think that his screen name is Chris@JVC. Now, I do not know if this is a new addition with PrE 8, or if it might have found its way into CS4.2. You might want to Search the PrE forum, for MOD and JVC. I also responded in most of those threads, so you could also filter on People and choose Bill Hunt. I'll see if I can find his posts, as there could be some useful details. Will post links.

           

          Good luck,

           

          Hunt

          • 2. Re: What is the best way to handle .mod files in premiere pro cs4?
            the_wine_snob Level 9

            Take a look at this THREAD, and read down to the replies from Chris@JVC.

             

            Remember, this is for PrE 8, so do not know how much might translate to CS4.

             

            Good luck,

             

            Hunt

            • 4. Re: What is the best way to handle .mod files in premiere pro cs4?
              the_wine_snob Level 9

              Ann,

               

              That Web page is the one that I linked to in the first reply. I even gave you attribution for finding that and pointing it out to me - thanks again.

               

              I just sent a PM to Chris at JVC, asking how his/her comments on the PrE forum might apply to CS4.2 - if at all. Hope to hear back soon, and will update this thread, plus that MOD & TOD article with the comments from JVC.

               

              Something that I did not realize was that JVC has dropped the TOD HD format, in favor of AVCHD. Chris says that they do full-spec. AVCHD, so no issues.

               

              Take care,

               

              Hunt

              • 5. Re: What is the best way to handle .mod files in premiere pro cs4?
                Lucas.117 Level 1

                I have just done a bit of reading, here. All of the quotes that follow are from users who have posted in that thread.

                 

                It seems that there isn't one solid answer on this subject. The thread that I linked to was started 2 years ago, and replied to just 4 ago, so it's relatively current.

                 

                I noticed a couple different interesting statements:

                posted by mmontgomery:

                 

                In the case of .MOD, you are actually getting a MPEG-2 file. The way video files work is that there is a codec (COmpressor/DECompressor) algorithm and a file wrapper (or extension). A JVC .MOD file is a MPEG-2 encoded file, with a .MOD extension.

                 

                You're faced with two challenges, first the .MOD file type is only recognized and support by a few applications. I think we covered some of those already. The interesting thing about wrappers and extensions is that they can be dealt with in a variety of ways. Sometimes all you need to do to convert the video file to a compatible video file is to change the extension. In the case of .MOD files that's not enough. The .MOD wrapper apparently does a few more things than just bare a unique extension name. It requires a slightly more complicated method to convert that file. That is why there is supplied software and that certain third party applications have .MOD support.

                 

                (posted 2 years ago)

                 

                This seems to indicate that Ann's solution of simply re-naming the extension is not good enough, unless I am mis-interpreting what she meant.

                 

                However, another user said:

                posted by futball8:

                 

                I edit with Adobe Premiere Pro CS3. All I have to do is simply rename the .MOD files as .MPG and then import into PP CS3. It takes a small amount of time to conform the audio, but no file conversion is necessary. It's a pretty slick workflow and I've never encountered any problems editing them this way.

                 

                (posted 5 months ago)

                 

                One can only assume that simply re-naming the extension from .mod to .mpg works in some circumstances, and doesn't work in others. I assume it depends largely on the editing software being used. Perhaps there are still issues that futball8 was simply unaware of or never encountered.

                 

                That said, there seems to be a couple of different real solutions to this problem that I have found:

                 

                1. Simply use an editing program that supports .mod file format. While pe7 and pe8 supposedly support the .mod format, the following should be noted:

                posted by macksgarage:

                 

                While Elements 'supports' these files, it is markedly unstable and  frequently crashes while using the files, though the application is otherwise reliable.  The solution I have arrived at is to repair the  container using ffmpeg. (see #3)

                 

                (posted 5 months ago)

                 

                2. Use a file conversion utility of your choice that will covert .mod to .avi, or another desired format. Import the resulting .avi file into premiere pro cs4.

                 

                3. Use FFmpeg. This seems to be the best solution as it does not convert any audio or video:

                posted by macksgarae:

                 

                If you are not familiar with ffmpeg, it may be a bit of a bear to learn, but it's not only useful for this, but functions as a video swiss army knife useful for splicing, muxing/demuxing, and rendering just about any format into just about any other format.

                 

                ffmpeg is an open source project from the linux world, but it has been ported and is supported on windows.  Fetch it here and place it somewhere handy on your system.

                 

                To rewrite the container into a nice, standards compliant .mpg file that doesn't make applications die, WITHOUT rerendering video or audio itself, I use this command.

                 

                ffmpeg -i INFILE.MOD  -acodec copy - vcodec copy OUTFILE.mpg

                 

                This not only renames the file, but actually rebuilds the container around unmodified video and audio data, yielding a file which works much more stably with Adobe applications, and presumably others as well, as ffmpeg's open source development goals result in very standards compliant files.

                 

                (posted 5 months ago)

                 

                Now, this seems to properly address the issues that can arise from simply renaming .mod to .mpg, as suggested by Ann. So from this point, I assume you can simply import the .mpg into Premiere Pro cs4 (or any other .mpg compliant program) and edit without issue, but it seems like I remember hearing something about Premiere not liking mpegs or something like that, so in that case, maybe it'd be better to skip this and go with option #2. But, it's been awhile since I've touched any NLE, much less premiere pro cs4, so I could be completely wrong and it may have no problems handling mpegs.

                 

                All of the things that I've quoted here came from the same thread, so I don't know how accurate any of this is, but the people that have posted these things seem fairly knowledgeable. If someone reads all of this and can confirm or deny any of it, it would be much appreciated.

                 

                Option 1 is not really an option for me, because I am sticking with premiere pro cs4 -- I'm not going to get another editor just because it has .mod support. That leaves me with options 2 and 3: Convert to avi, or change the file wrapper/extension properly with FFmpeg and then simply import the resulting .mpg file... Which is better? Or is there yet another solution that I am unaware of that would be even better?

                • 6. Re: What is the best way to handle .mod files in premiere pro cs4?
                  Colin-B Level 1

                  Lucas.117 wrote:

                   

                  One can only assume that simply re-naming the extension from .mod to .mpg works in some circumstances, and doesn't work in others.

                   

                  I'm surpised that there are these problems with some MOD files - all of the MOD files I've seen are simply 2048-byte MPEG-2 Program Stream files, so renaming them to .mpg (without any conversion) always works for me.

                   

                  Does anyone have a an example MOD file which has these problems?  I'll take a look at the structure and see if I can find what is causing the problem.

                  • 7. Re: What is the best way to handle .mod files in premiere pro cs4?
                    Ann Bens Adobe Community Professional & MVP
                    function(){return A.apply(null,[this].concat($A(arguments)))}

                    This seems to indicate that Ann's solution of simply re-naming the extension is not good enough, unless I am mis-interpreting what she meant.


                    Have you tried it?

                    • 8. Re: What is the best way to handle .mod files in premiere pro cs4?
                      the_wine_snob Level 9

                      I just heard back from Chris@JVC. The report is that PrE 8.1 does fully support the MOD format/CODEC and works with no limitations. Unfortunately, JVC has not tested with CS4.x, because it is assumed that the majority of shooters, using these JVC cameras will not be using PrPro. This was not a denouncement of PrPro and MOD, but just that the company was focusing in on consumer NLE's, and had not anticipated these cameras being used in PrPro.

                       

                      Sorry that there was not full details, but Chris did confirm that PrE 8.1 works perfectly, and directly with MOD files.

                       

                      I updated my MOD & TOD Files article to link to one of Chris' responses.

                       

                      Good luck,

                       

                      Hunt

                      • 9. Re: What is the best way to handle .mod files in premiere pro cs4?
                        the_wine_snob Level 9

                        Colin,

                         

                        If you, or Ann, do test some problematic MOD files, and have info to share, please post it to this thread. I'll be glad to add the link to the MOD & TOD Files article, to help others in the future.

                         

                        TIA,

                         

                        Hunt

                        • 10. Re: What is the best way to handle .mod files in premiere pro cs4?
                          Colin-B Level 1

                          I will be only too happy to investigate if anyone can send or provide a link to a problematic MOD file.

                           

                          At the moment I can't see how there can be any problems, except perhaps the audio stream's format not being supported by the importing program.

                          • 11. Re: What is the best way to handle .mod files in premiere pro cs4?
                            Lucas.117 Level 1

                            Bill Hunt wrote:

                             

                            I just heard back from Chris@JVC. The report is that PrE 8.1 does fully support the MOD format/CODEC and works with no limitations. Unfortunately, JVC has not tested with CS4.x, because it is assumed that the majority of shooters, using these JVC cameras will not be using PrPro. This was not a denouncement of PrPro and MOD, but just that the company was focusing in on consumer NLE's, and had not anticipated these cameras being used in PrPro.

                             

                            Sorry that there was not full details, but Chris did confirm that PrE 8.1 works perfectly, and directly with MOD files.

                             

                            I updated my MOD & TOD Files article to link to one of Chris' responses.

                             

                            Good luck,

                             

                            Hunt

                             

                             

                            That's unfortunate that they made that distinction, but it's probably accurate for the most part. Why they have to use a proprietary wrapper is beyond my understanding.

                             

                            As for your question Ann, I should hopefully get the camera in the mail this week, and you can bet that I will be testing all of these things as soon as it's in my hands.

                             

                            I will record a few test clips and if I run into any problems, I will certainly post them here as requested by colin. Thanks for all of the help.

                            • 12. Re: What is the best way to handle .mod files in premiere pro cs4?
                              the_wine_snob Level 9
                              That's unfortunate that they made that distinction, but it's probably accurate for the most part. Why they have to use a proprietary wrapper is beyond my understanding.

                               

                              That was a bit of speculation on Chris' and my part, but Chris had no experience with PrPro, so it's not quite like saying that it will not work, only that it was tested on PrE 8 only. The "way" was a combo of our speculation.

                               

                              As for proprietary wrappers and CODEC's, this has become very popular with many camera mfgrs. They are all rushing to come up with greater compression, but still want to maintain as much quality, as is possible. Many take existing CODEC's, but then tweak them to suit. Some make more major changes. Recently, Nikon resurrected the MJPEG CODEC, that had fallen into disuse for their recent DSLR's, that shoot video too.

                               

                              My feeling is that all mfgrs. should include their particular CODEC on a utility disc, for installation, but few bother. They leave it up to the owners to search these out and buy/download them. Recently, one of the off-brand, consumer cameras DID have the CODEC on the software disc. I was amazed. It installed, and worked well for the user in PrE. Forget which brand of camera, but this was definitely a lower-end unit. It had the necessary tweaked CODEC, which worked well, and much higher-end cameras lack these. We I the product manager, I'd make sure that the user got the necessary CODEC, even if the camera had to cost US$40 more, just because of licensing fees. I'd never leave the customer hanging on this issue.

                               

                              Just my thoughts,

                               

                              Hunt