7 Replies Latest reply on Apr 9, 2010 12:16 PM by the_wine_snob

    Help with Blu Ray burning requested

    GoodBoySteve Level 1

      I've been using PRE for many years now very succesfully with no significant problems until I entered the world of HD and Blu Ray. My system specs are at the bottom of this post.  I've been recording HD for some years now on my Sony HDV camcorder and rewriting the final production back onto HDV tapes.  I recently decided to move up and get myself a blu ray writer now that burners and media have become affordable (well relatively) . . . and the beginning of all my problems.

       

      Normally I create 10 minute final productions from about an hour of footage; however, after a 3-week trip to China, I've created a 50 minute production from which I want to create a Blu Ray disk.  The production contains quite a lot of transitions, titles and still images (taken with 10 Megapixel camera).

      I can render the project OK although it does take quite a few hours.  However, my system crashes (Blue Screen) at about 85% of the way through the Blu Ray encoding process.  I've split the project into 2 seperate projects - one of 20 minutes and one of 30 minutes.  The 20 minute one burns to Bly Ray ok but the 30 minute project still crashes (Blue Screen again) towards the end.  One obvious solution would be to split the project down in to 3 seperate projects and burn to 3 Blu Ray disks but this kind of ruins the point of having a Blu Ray writer as I could have created 3 AVCHD DVD disks instead.

       

      The problem seems to be lack of memory.  The encoding process seems to work in the 1 - 2 GB space until very near the end when the memory requirement seems to soar up to 4 GB limit.  My suspicion is that Premiere is trying to use all the system memory and tramples over the system needs hence causing the whole system to Blue Screen.

       

      I've scoured through the various forums and have found that lots of other users have had similar problems but not found any solutions.  Has anyone managed to create a decent sized Blu Ray disk from Premiere Elements - and, does anyone know the minimum configuration for doing this. 

       

      System:

      Premiere Elements 8

      Sony Viao VPCCW1S1E - Intel Core 2 Duo P7450 running Windows 7, 4 GB memory with everything running on the system c: drive.with 150 GB free.

      NVidea GeForce GT 230M video adaptor

       

      Thanks Steve

        • 1. Re: Help with Blu Ray burning requested
          the_wine_snob Level 9

          Steve,

           

          First a question: what is the size of your still images in pixel x pixel dimensions?

           

          Now, a BSOD is almost always a hardware issue. The most common causes are:

           

          1.) Heat build up, especially with regard to the CPU

          2.) RAM - usually a block going bad

          3.) Powersupply either under powered for the load, going bad or perhaps a rail not being up to the necessary voltage.

          3.) MoBo - often a soldered connection (could be almost anywhere in the bus) heating up and separating.

           

          First thing that I would do would be to turn OFF Reboot on Error, in hopes that there will be something useful on the BSOD. Next, I would download and install SpeedFan, which will monitor every sensor on your computer. Along the way, I would check the operations of all fans, and clean out any dust. Run the system under the same load, but with SpeedFan's GUI up. Watch the temps everywhere.

           

          This ARTICLE's links will point you to several great utilities, including SpeedFan.

           

          There are also RAM testing utilities, and I would run those.

           

          Check the output of your power supply and check that against what is needed for each rail. Do not forget to add the load of your new BD burner.

           

          In case the BSOD screen does not offer any help (often it's just bunches of code, that no one can gather any info from), this ARTICLE will give you tips on finding out clues as to what is happening on your computer, when the BSOD happens.

           

          Though it will likely not help, as a BSOD is most often hardware related, but this ARTICLE will help you get your system ready (once the BSOD issue is solved) for Video editing.

           

          Last, having only one HDD is a big handicap when editing Video, and doubly so with HD. One needs an absolute minimum of 2x 7200 RPM (min.) HDD's, and my recommended minimum is 3x. For HD playback, Adobe recommends at least a RAID 0 for the media drive, for PrPro. PrE is not that much different, regarding real-world system requirements for HD.

           

          Good luck,

           

          Hunt

          1 person found this helpful
          • 2. Re: Help with Blu Ray burning requested
            GoodBoySteve Level 1

            Bill, thanks for your comprehensive list of suggestions - I'm working my way though them to further resolve the issue.  However, how do I "turn off reboot on error" - I've looked on all the help systems but can't seem to find out how to do it.

             

            NB: I have about 30 stills embedded (3872 x 2592 pixels) - however, to hopefully eliminate possible problems with the stills and the transitions I converted the compllete project into an AVCHD file and then imported this into a seperate project which is what I'm now using.

             

            Thanks

            Steve

            • 3. Re: Help with Blu Ray burning requested
              the_wine_snob Level 9
              how do I "turn off reboot on error"

               

              With most BIOS, this can be set in the Setup routine, that is accessed during the POST. Now, the keystroke combo will differ BIOS to BIOS, and the location of this toggle will differ too.

               

              I have about 30 stills embedded (3872 x 2592 pixels) - however, to hopefully eliminate possible problems with the stills and the transitions I converted the compllete project into an AVCHD file and then imported this into a seperate project which is what I'm now using.

               

              A comment on the stills first. Video is one instance, where bigger is not better. The scaling algorithms in an NLE program are inferior to those in an image editing program. You quality will be better, if you Scale outside of the NLE, and the workload will be greatly reduced. This ARTICLE will give you some background and tips.

               

              Now, why did you choose AVCHD? That is a highly compressed and CPU intensive CODEC. I think that HDV would be better here. Another option might be the Lagarith Lossless CODEC, as I think it handles HD material too.

               

              Good luck,

               

              Hunt

               

              [Edit] Just looked at your CPU. A Dual-core CPU will likely never be able to handle AVCHD. I'm not even sure how you Exported/Shared to AVCHD.

              1 person found this helpful
              • 4. Re: Help with Blu Ray burning requested
                GoodBoySteve Level 1

                Many thanks:

                 

                I' ve commited the cardinal error of changing too many things at once so I'm having to go back and start a more methodical approach to my BSOD problem.   However

                 

                1) I've found the reboot on error toggle so this will (hopefully help).

                 

                2) Good point about scaling the stills outside the NLE and then importing them in - I'll do this.

                 

                3) AVCHD choice - when my project got to about 45 mins PE8 started to become slow and unstable (not surprising considering the system I'm using) so I split it into 2 seperate projects and the only way I could find of merging back into a single project was to convert each project to an HD file format that I could reimport into a new project.  I used "Share PC / MPEG / H264 1920x1080i 25" - this created an AVCHD file that I could import back into PE, render and then re-export.  How do I create an HDV file (without writing back to tape and then re-importing?

                 

                Thanks for your help.

                 

                Steve

                • 5. Re: Help with Blu Ray burning requested
                  the_wine_snob Level 9
                  3) AVCHD choice - when my project got to about 45 mins PE8 started to become slow and unstable (not surprising considering the system I'm using) so I split it into 2 seperate projects and the only way I could find of merging back into a single project was to convert each project to an HD file format that I could reimport into a new project.  I used "Share PC / MPEG / H264 1920x1080i 25" - this created an AVCHD file that I could import back into PE, render and then re-export.  How do I create an HDV file (without writing back to tape and then re-importing?

                   

                  AVCHD is very tough to edit. Many users recommend an overclocked i7 CPU, sitting in a very stout system. Unfortunately, camera mfgrs. introduced this, but forgot to tell their customers that they would have to buy a state-of-the-art computer, just to edit it.

                   

                  As for the HDV, there is a FAQ Entry, on doing this. I do not shoot AVCHD, so I cannot vouch for this FAQ Entry, but since Steve Grisetti wrote it, I take it as gospel.

                   

                  Hope that helps,

                   

                  Hunt

                   

                  PS - PrE is designed to function perfectly with DVD length Projects (that's SD), but it does OK with BD Projects now. Still, when the Duration of the Timeline gets up there, breaking the Project into manageable pieces is the recommended route. That is one of the things that I like about PrPRo - it uses Sequences (think of mini-Projects in a single "master Project."), and I use those as my "chapters."

                  • 6. Re: Help with Blu Ray burning requested
                    GoodBoySteve Level 1

                    SUCCESS

                     

                    Thanks for your help - I've now burned my 55 min Blu Ray disk.  It took over 10 hours to encode the project and burn the disk but everthing now working and understood.  I believe the problem was overheating of my laptop as you'd intimated - the air intakes, on my Sony Vaio, are underneath the machine and are easy to obstruct when, for instance, using the machine on one's lap or putting it on a soft surfacee.

                     

                    I've been a fan of Premiere for very many years and much appreciated its stability - so I'm glad that my faith has been restored by finding that the problem was my fault and not Adobe's.

                     


                    Thanks again - Steve

                    • 7. Re: Help with Blu Ray burning requested
                      the_wine_snob Level 9

                      Steve,

                       

                      Great news, and thank you for reporting.

                       

                      I understand the laptop vents. My Sager has them all over, but I still use a Zalman cooler pad, and the combo is on a teak table with openings. Still, as I am outdoors most of the time, I have to remove the "dust bunnies" frequently - actually, they are more like "dust buffalo!"

                       

                      Good luck,

                       

                      Hunt