12 Replies Latest reply on Sep 8, 2007 5:29 AM by Newsgroup_User

    Removing Photo Background

    Level 7
      I need some assistance! I arranged a photoshoot for a friend/client and even
      purchased a small light tent kit to do the product photography for her.
      Having never done this before, I assumed that I'd be able to use the Magic
      Wand to remove the background easily because it would be a solid color.

      The reality is that because there isn't much contrast between parts of the
      products, I'm having a heck of a time with that tool. I've tried some of the
      techniques from Linda's books, and again, because there's not much contrast,
      I haven't had much luck. There's a LOT of pictures, and I dread the thought
      of the hours I'd have to spend with the pen tool to do a decent job with
      this.

      I posted a sample here: http://www.eranaturalbeauty.com/testing/, and would
      appreciate any ideas on how I can remove that background - the client wants
      a plain white behind the products. Thanks!

      --
      ~ Bruce
      Quit laughing at me if you want to send me email!

        • 1. Re: Removing Photo Background
          Level 7
          On Fri, 07 Sep 2007 17:53:09 +0400, MrBruce <mrbrucecHA@HAhotHAmail.com>
          wrote:

          > I need some assistance! I arranged a photoshoot for a friend/client and
          > even purchased a small light tent kit to do the product photography for
          > her. Having never done this before, I assumed that I'd be able to use
          > the Magic Wand to remove the background easily because it would be a
          > solid color.
          >
          > The reality is that because there isn't much contrast between parts of
          > the products, I'm having a heck of a time with that tool. I've tried
          > some of the techniques from Linda's books, and again, because there's
          > not much contrast, I haven't had much luck. There's a LOT of pictures,
          > and I dread the thought of the hours I'd have to spend with the pen tool
          > to do a decent job with this.
          >
          > I posted a sample here: http://www.eranaturalbeauty.com/testing/, and
          > would appreciate any ideas on how I can remove that background - the
          > client wants a plain white behind the products. Thanks!
          >

          For that cylindrical packs, using vector masks should be pretty easy and,
          most likely, provide the best solution.

          For things like leaves and fruits, Windows users may use this:

          http://research.graphicon.ru/image-processing/gml-matting-6.html

          work reasonably well. Not so perfect with packs due to low local contrast,
          but if you don't need to remove table, looks good enough to me.

          --
          Ilya Razmanov
          http://photoshop.msk.ru - Photoshop plug-in filters
          • 2. Re: Removing Photo Background
            Level 7
            "Ilya Razmanov" <ilyich@ioc.ac.ru> wrote in message
            news:op.tyaesqhw6e3g07@l2.ioc.ac.ru...
            > On Fri, 07 Sep 2007 17:53:09 +0400, MrBruce <mrbrucecHA@HAhotHAmail.com>
            > wrote:
            >
            >> I need some assistance! I arranged a photoshoot for a friend/client and
            >> even purchased a small light tent kit to do the product photography for
            >> her. Having never done this before, I assumed that I'd be able to use
            >> the Magic Wand to remove the background easily because it would be a
            >> solid color.
            >>
            >> The reality is that because there isn't much contrast between parts of
            >> the products, I'm having a heck of a time with that tool. I've tried
            >> some of the techniques from Linda's books, and again, because there's
            >> not much contrast, I haven't had much luck. There's a LOT of pictures,
            >> and I dread the thought of the hours I'd have to spend with the pen tool
            >> to do a decent job with this.
            >>
            >> I posted a sample here: http://www.eranaturalbeauty.com/testing/, and
            >> would appreciate any ideas on how I can remove that background - the
            >> client wants a plain white behind the products. Thanks!
            >>
            >
            > For that cylindrical packs, using vector masks should be pretty easy and,
            > most likely, provide the best solution.
            >
            > For things like leaves and fruits, Windows users may use this:
            >
            > http://research.graphicon.ru/image-processing/gml-matting-6.html
            >
            > work reasonably well. Not so perfect with packs due to low local contrast,
            > but if you don't need to remove table, looks good enough to me.
            >
            > --
            > Ilya Razmanov
            > http://photoshop.msk.ru - Photoshop plug-in filters


            Thank you, Ilya! I will experiment with that!

            ~ Bruce

            • 3. Re: Removing Photo Background
              Level 7
              MrBruce wrote:
              > "Ilya Razmanov" <ilyich@ioc.ac.ru> wrote in message
              > news:op.tyaesqhw6e3g07@l2.ioc.ac.ru...
              >> On Fri, 07 Sep 2007 17:53:09 +0400, MrBruce
              >> <mrbrucecHA@HAhotHAmail.com> wrote:
              >>
              >>> I need some assistance! I arranged a photoshoot for a friend/client
              >>> and even purchased a small light tent kit to do the product
              >>> photography for her. Having never done this before, I assumed that
              >>> I'd be able to use the Magic Wand to remove the background easily
              >>> because it would be a solid color.
              >>>
              >>> The reality is that because there isn't much contrast between parts
              >>> of the products, I'm having a heck of a time with that tool. I've
              >>> tried some of the techniques from Linda's books, and again, because
              >>> there's not much contrast, I haven't had much luck. There's a LOT of
              >>> pictures, and I dread the thought of the hours I'd have to spend with
              >>> the pen tool to do a decent job with this.
              >>>
              >>> I posted a sample here: http://www.eranaturalbeauty.com/testing/, and
              >>> would appreciate any ideas on how I can remove that background - the
              >>> client wants a plain white behind the products. Thanks!
              >>>
              >>
              >> For that cylindrical packs, using vector masks should be pretty easy
              >> and, most likely, provide the best solution.
              >>
              >> For things like leaves and fruits, Windows users may use this:
              >>
              >> http://research.graphicon.ru/image-processing/gml-matting-6.html
              >>
              >> work reasonably well. Not so perfect with packs due to low local
              >> contrast, but if you don't need to remove table, looks good enough to me.
              >>
              >> --
              >> Ilya Razmanov
              >> http://photoshop.msk.ru - Photoshop plug-in filters
              >
              >
              > Thank you, Ilya! I will experiment with that!
              >
              > ~ Bruce

              A bit late for this advice now, Bruce, but traditionally, if objects
              need to be close cut, the photographer would shoot them individually and
              use cards (black, white or gray) to help separate the object from the
              background. These "separators" would need to be positioned so they do
              not reflect in the product surface. This makes it quite easy to close
              cut the images with the magic wand or other matting tools. If a group
              arrangement is necessary, make sure that your background color choice
              does not appear in the products (white lids, white background) and also
              that the color is a neutral one, if the products are sitting on the
              backdrop.

              I was able to get some decent result in about 10 minutes by doing the
              following:

              1 -open the image and create two duplicates.
              2- On the top duplicate, apply Color Burn blend mode
              3 - Select the blend object and the one directly beneath it and flatten
              those two objects only. This will leave you with two objects, one much
              darker and the other normal.
              4- set your magic wad to about 22 tolerance ad start shift clicking to
              select the background. You may have to alter the tolerance occasionally.
              5 -With the background selected, go to Select > Inverse
              6 -Optionally, you can smooth the selection but no more than 1 pixel or two.
              7 - Select > Save the bitmap selection. This way you can reload it if
              necessary.
              8 -Select > Convert to Marquee to Path
              9 - hide and lock the dark image so only the original shows up.
              10- cut the new path
              11 - Edit > Paste as mask
              12- Because it's a vector mask, you can use the sub selection tool to
              further tweak the mask.

              Hope this helps.
              --
              Jim Babbage - .:Community MX:. & .:Adobe Community Expert:.
              Extending Knowledge, Daily
              http://www.communityMX.com/
              CommunityMX - Free Resources:
              http://www.communitymx.com/free.cfm
              ---
              .:Adobe Community Expert for Fireworks:.
              news://forums.macromedia.com/macromedia.fireworks
              news://forums.macromedia.com/macromedia.dreamweaver
              • 4. Re: Removing Photo Background
                Level 7
                "Jim Babbage .:CMX:. & .:Adobe Community Expert:."
                <jbabbage@newmediaservices.ca> wrote in message
                news:fbrrti$q5l$1@forums.macromedia.com...
                > MrBruce wrote:
                >> "Ilya Razmanov" <ilyich@ioc.ac.ru> wrote in message
                >> news:op.tyaesqhw6e3g07@l2.ioc.ac.ru...
                >>> On Fri, 07 Sep 2007 17:53:09 +0400, MrBruce <mrbrucecHA@HAhotHAmail.com>
                >>> wrote:
                >>>
                >>>> I need some assistance! I arranged a photoshoot for a friend/client and
                >>>> even purchased a small light tent kit to do the product photography for
                >>>> her. Having never done this before, I assumed that I'd be able to use
                >>>> the Magic Wand to remove the background easily because it would be a
                >>>> solid color.
                >>>>
                >>>> The reality is that because there isn't much contrast between parts of
                >>>> the products, I'm having a heck of a time with that tool. I've tried
                >>>> some of the techniques from Linda's books, and again, because there's
                >>>> not much contrast, I haven't had much luck. There's a LOT of pictures,
                >>>> and I dread the thought of the hours I'd have to spend with the pen
                >>>> tool to do a decent job with this.
                >>>>
                >>>> I posted a sample here: http://www.eranaturalbeauty.com/testing/, and
                >>>> would appreciate any ideas on how I can remove that background - the
                >>>> client wants a plain white behind the products. Thanks!
                >>>>
                >>>
                >>> For that cylindrical packs, using vector masks should be pretty easy
                >>> and, most likely, provide the best solution.
                >>>
                >>> For things like leaves and fruits, Windows users may use this:
                >>>
                >>> http://research.graphicon.ru/image-processing/gml-matting-6.html
                >>>
                >>> work reasonably well. Not so perfect with packs due to low local
                >>> contrast, but if you don't need to remove table, looks good enough to
                >>> me.
                >>>
                >>> --
                >>> Ilya Razmanov
                >>> http://photoshop.msk.ru - Photoshop plug-in filters
                >>
                >>
                >> Thank you, Ilya! I will experiment with that!
                >>
                >> ~ Bruce
                >
                > A bit late for this advice now, Bruce, but traditionally, if objects need
                > to be close cut, the photographer would shoot them individually and use
                > cards (black, white or gray) to help separate the object from the
                > background. These "separators" would need to be positioned so they do not
                > reflect in the product surface. This makes it quite easy to close cut the
                > images with the magic wand or other matting tools. If a group arrangement
                > is necessary, make sure that your background color choice does not appear
                > in the products (white lids, white background) and also that the color is
                > a neutral one, if the products are sitting on the backdrop.
                >
                > I was able to get some decent result in about 10 minutes by doing the
                > following:
                >
                > 1 -open the image and create two duplicates.
                > 2- On the top duplicate, apply Color Burn blend mode
                > 3 - Select the blend object and the one directly beneath it and flatten
                > those two objects only. This will leave you with two objects, one much
                > darker and the other normal.
                > 4- set your magic wad to about 22 tolerance ad start shift clicking to
                > select the background. You may have to alter the tolerance occasionally.
                > 5 -With the background selected, go to Select > Inverse
                > 6 -Optionally, you can smooth the selection but no more than 1 pixel or
                > two.
                > 7 - Select > Save the bitmap selection. This way you can reload it if
                > necessary.
                > 8 -Select > Convert to Marquee to Path
                > 9 - hide and lock the dark image so only the original shows up.
                > 10- cut the new path
                > 11 - Edit > Paste as mask
                > 12- Because it's a vector mask, you can use the sub selection tool to
                > further tweak the mask.
                >
                > Hope this helps.
                > --
                > Jim Babbage - .:Community MX:. & .:Adobe Community Expert:.
                > Extending Knowledge, Daily
                > http://www.communityMX.com/
                > CommunityMX - Free Resources:
                > http://www.communitymx.com/free.cfm
                > ---
                > .:Adobe Community Expert for Fireworks:.
                > news://forums.macromedia.com/macromedia.fireworks
                > news://forums.macromedia.com/macromedia.dreamweaver


                Thanks, Jim! I guess I won't be making THAT mistake again!

                I'll be trying your solution shortly - will let you know how I make out!

                ~ Bruce

                • 5. Re: Removing Photo Background
                  Level 7
                  "MrBruce" <mrbrucecHA@HAhotHAmail.com> wrote in message
                  news:fbrsls$qu0$1@forums.macromedia.com...
                  > "Jim Babbage .:CMX:. & .:Adobe Community Expert:."
                  > <jbabbage@newmediaservices.ca> wrote in message
                  > news:fbrrti$q5l$1@forums.macromedia.com...
                  >> MrBruce wrote:
                  >>> "Ilya Razmanov" <ilyich@ioc.ac.ru> wrote in message
                  >>> news:op.tyaesqhw6e3g07@l2.ioc.ac.ru...
                  >>>> On Fri, 07 Sep 2007 17:53:09 +0400, MrBruce
                  >>>> <mrbrucecHA@HAhotHAmail.com> wrote:
                  >>>>
                  >>>>> I need some assistance! I arranged a photoshoot for a friend/client
                  >>>>> and even purchased a small light tent kit to do the product
                  >>>>> photography for her. Having never done this before, I assumed that I'd
                  >>>>> be able to use the Magic Wand to remove the background easily because
                  >>>>> it would be a solid color.
                  >>>>>
                  >>>>> The reality is that because there isn't much contrast between parts of
                  >>>>> the products, I'm having a heck of a time with that tool. I've tried
                  >>>>> some of the techniques from Linda's books, and again, because there's
                  >>>>> not much contrast, I haven't had much luck. There's a LOT of pictures,
                  >>>>> and I dread the thought of the hours I'd have to spend with the pen
                  >>>>> tool to do a decent job with this.
                  >>>>>
                  >>>>> I posted a sample here: http://www.eranaturalbeauty.com/testing/, and
                  >>>>> would appreciate any ideas on how I can remove that background - the
                  >>>>> client wants a plain white behind the products. Thanks!
                  >>>>>
                  >>>>
                  >>>> For that cylindrical packs, using vector masks should be pretty easy
                  >>>> and, most likely, provide the best solution.
                  >>>>
                  >>>> For things like leaves and fruits, Windows users may use this:
                  >>>>
                  >>>> http://research.graphicon.ru/image-processing/gml-matting-6.html
                  >>>>
                  >>>> work reasonably well. Not so perfect with packs due to low local
                  >>>> contrast, but if you don't need to remove table, looks good enough to
                  >>>> me.
                  >>>>
                  >>>> --
                  >>>> Ilya Razmanov
                  >>>> http://photoshop.msk.ru - Photoshop plug-in filters
                  >>>
                  >>>
                  >>> Thank you, Ilya! I will experiment with that!
                  >>>
                  >>> ~ Bruce
                  >>
                  >> A bit late for this advice now, Bruce, but traditionally, if objects
                  >> need to be close cut, the photographer would shoot them individually and
                  >> use cards (black, white or gray) to help separate the object from the
                  >> background. These "separators" would need to be positioned so they do not
                  >> reflect in the product surface. This makes it quite easy to close cut the
                  >> images with the magic wand or other matting tools. If a group arrangement
                  >> is necessary, make sure that your background color choice does not appear
                  >> in the products (white lids, white background) and also that the color is
                  >> a neutral one, if the products are sitting on the backdrop.
                  >>
                  >> I was able to get some decent result in about 10 minutes by doing the
                  >> following:
                  >>
                  >> 1 -open the image and create two duplicates.
                  >> 2- On the top duplicate, apply Color Burn blend mode
                  >> 3 - Select the blend object and the one directly beneath it and flatten
                  >> those two objects only. This will leave you with two objects, one much
                  >> darker and the other normal.
                  >> 4- set your magic wad to about 22 tolerance ad start shift clicking to
                  >> select the background. You may have to alter the tolerance occasionally.
                  >> 5 -With the background selected, go to Select > Inverse
                  >> 6 -Optionally, you can smooth the selection but no more than 1 pixel or
                  >> two.
                  >> 7 - Select > Save the bitmap selection. This way you can reload it if
                  >> necessary.
                  >> 8 -Select > Convert to Marquee to Path
                  >> 9 - hide and lock the dark image so only the original shows up.
                  >> 10- cut the new path
                  >> 11 - Edit > Paste as mask
                  >> 12- Because it's a vector mask, you can use the sub selection tool to
                  >> further tweak the mask.
                  >>
                  >> Hope this helps.
                  >> --
                  >> Jim Babbage - .:Community MX:. & .:Adobe Community Expert:.
                  >> Extending Knowledge, Daily
                  >> http://www.communityMX.com/
                  >> CommunityMX - Free Resources:
                  >> http://www.communitymx.com/free.cfm
                  >> ---
                  >> .:Adobe Community Expert for Fireworks:.
                  >> news://forums.macromedia.com/macromedia.fireworks
                  >> news://forums.macromedia.com/macromedia.dreamweaver
                  >
                  >
                  > Thanks, Jim! I guess I won't be making THAT mistake again!
                  >
                  > I'll be trying your solution shortly - will let you know how I make out!
                  >
                  > ~ Bruce

                  Jim...

                  I just went to try this and got caught at Step 2! I have Fireworks 8 and I
                  can't find a "Color Burn blend mode."

                  ???

                  ~ Bruce

                  • 6. Re: Removing Photo Background
                    Level 7
                    MrBruce wrote:
                    > "MrBruce" <mrbrucecHA@HAhotHAmail.com> wrote in message
                    > news:fbrsls$qu0$1@forums.macromedia.com...
                    >> "Jim Babbage .:CMX:. & .:Adobe Community Expert:."
                    >> <jbabbage@newmediaservices.ca> wrote in message
                    >> news:fbrrti$q5l$1@forums.macromedia.com...
                    >>> MrBruce wrote:
                    >>>> "Ilya Razmanov" <ilyich@ioc.ac.ru> wrote in message
                    >>>> news:op.tyaesqhw6e3g07@l2.ioc.ac.ru...
                    >>>>> On Fri, 07 Sep 2007 17:53:09 +0400, MrBruce
                    >>>>> <mrbrucecHA@HAhotHAmail.com> wrote:
                    >>>>>
                    >>>>>> I need some assistance! I arranged a photoshoot for a
                    >>>>>> friend/client and even purchased a small light tent kit to do the
                    >>>>>> product photography for her. Having never done this before, I
                    >>>>>> assumed that I'd be able to use the Magic Wand to remove the
                    >>>>>> background easily because it would be a solid color.
                    >>>>>>
                    >>>>>> The reality is that because there isn't much contrast between
                    >>>>>> parts of the products, I'm having a heck of a time with that tool.
                    >>>>>> I've tried some of the techniques from Linda's books, and again,
                    >>>>>> because there's not much contrast, I haven't had much luck.
                    >>>>>> There's a LOT of pictures, and I dread the thought of the hours
                    >>>>>> I'd have to spend with the pen tool to do a decent job with this.
                    >>>>>>
                    >>>>>> I posted a sample here: http://www.eranaturalbeauty.com/testing/,
                    >>>>>> and would appreciate any ideas on how I can remove that background
                    >>>>>> - the client wants a plain white behind the products. Thanks!
                    >>>>>>
                    >>>>>
                    >>>>> For that cylindrical packs, using vector masks should be pretty
                    >>>>> easy and, most likely, provide the best solution.
                    >>>>>
                    >>>>> For things like leaves and fruits, Windows users may use this:
                    >>>>>
                    >>>>> http://research.graphicon.ru/image-processing/gml-matting-6.html
                    >>>>>
                    >>>>> work reasonably well. Not so perfect with packs due to low local
                    >>>>> contrast, but if you don't need to remove table, looks good enough
                    >>>>> to me.
                    >>>>>
                    >>>>> --
                    >>>>> Ilya Razmanov
                    >>>>> http://photoshop.msk.ru - Photoshop plug-in filters
                    >>>>
                    >>>>
                    >>>> Thank you, Ilya! I will experiment with that!
                    >>>>
                    >>>> ~ Bruce
                    >>>
                    >>> A bit late for this advice now, Bruce, but traditionally, if objects
                    >>> need to be close cut, the photographer would shoot them individually
                    >>> and use cards (black, white or gray) to help separate the object from
                    >>> the background. These "separators" would need to be positioned so
                    >>> they do not reflect in the product surface. This makes it quite easy
                    >>> to close cut the images with the magic wand or other matting tools.
                    >>> If a group arrangement is necessary, make sure that your background
                    >>> color choice does not appear in the products (white lids, white
                    >>> background) and also that the color is a neutral one, if the products
                    >>> are sitting on the backdrop.
                    >>>
                    >>> I was able to get some decent result in about 10 minutes by doing the
                    >>> following:
                    >>>
                    >>> 1 -open the image and create two duplicates.
                    >>> 2- On the top duplicate, apply Color Burn blend mode
                    >>> 3 - Select the blend object and the one directly beneath it and
                    >>> flatten those two objects only. This will leave you with two objects,
                    >>> one much darker and the other normal.
                    >>> 4- set your magic wad to about 22 tolerance ad start shift clicking
                    >>> to select the background. You may have to alter the tolerance
                    >>> occasionally.
                    >>> 5 -With the background selected, go to Select > Inverse
                    >>> 6 -Optionally, you can smooth the selection but no more than 1 pixel
                    >>> or two.
                    >>> 7 - Select > Save the bitmap selection. This way you can reload it if
                    >>> necessary.
                    >>> 8 -Select > Convert to Marquee to Path
                    >>> 9 - hide and lock the dark image so only the original shows up.
                    >>> 10- cut the new path
                    >>> 11 - Edit > Paste as mask
                    >>> 12- Because it's a vector mask, you can use the sub selection tool to
                    >>> further tweak the mask.
                    >>>
                    >>> Hope this helps.
                    >>> --
                    >>> Jim Babbage - .:Community MX:. & .:Adobe Community Expert:.
                    >>> Extending Knowledge, Daily
                    >>> http://www.communityMX.com/
                    >>> CommunityMX - Free Resources:
                    >>> http://www.communitymx.com/free.cfm
                    >>> ---
                    >>> .:Adobe Community Expert for Fireworks:.
                    >>> news://forums.macromedia.com/macromedia.fireworks
                    >>> news://forums.macromedia.com/macromedia.dreamweaver
                    >>
                    >>
                    >> Thanks, Jim! I guess I won't be making THAT mistake again!
                    >>
                    >> I'll be trying your solution shortly - will let you know how I make out!
                    >>
                    >> ~ Bruce
                    >
                    > Jim...
                    >
                    > I just went to try this and got caught at Step 2! I have Fireworks 8 and
                    > I can't find a "Color Burn blend mode."
                    >
                    > ???
                    >
                    > ~ Bruce

                    Ah yes, I'm on CS 3 so that would be a problem. Basically, you're
                    looking for a blend mode that increases contrast and color saturation.
                    Multiply might do it.

                    --
                    Jim Babbage - .:Community MX:. & .:Adobe Community Expert:.
                    Extending Knowledge, Daily
                    http://www.communityMX.com/
                    CommunityMX - Free Resources:
                    http://www.communitymx.com/free.cfm
                    ---
                    .:Adobe Community Expert for Fireworks:.
                    news://forums.macromedia.com/macromedia.fireworks
                    news://forums.macromedia.com/macromedia.dreamweaver
                    • 7. Re: Removing Photo Background
                      Level 7
                      That is a neat technique Jim!

                      Jim Babbage .:CMX:. & .:Adobe Community Expert:. wrote:
                      > MrBruce wrote:
                      >> "Ilya Razmanov" <ilyich@ioc.ac.ru> wrote in message
                      >> news:op.tyaesqhw6e3g07@l2.ioc.ac.ru...
                      >>> On Fri, 07 Sep 2007 17:53:09 +0400, MrBruce
                      >>> <mrbrucecHA@HAhotHAmail.com> wrote:
                      >>>
                      >>>> I need some assistance! I arranged a photoshoot for a friend/client
                      >>>> and even purchased a small light tent kit to do the product
                      >>>> photography for her. Having never done this before, I assumed that
                      >>>> I'd be able to use the Magic Wand to remove the background easily
                      >>>> because it would be a solid color.
                      >>>>
                      >>>> The reality is that because there isn't much contrast between parts
                      >>>> of the products, I'm having a heck of a time with that tool. I've
                      >>>> tried some of the techniques from Linda's books, and again, because
                      >>>> there's not much contrast, I haven't had much luck. There's a LOT of
                      >>>> pictures, and I dread the thought of the hours I'd have to spend
                      >>>> with the pen tool to do a decent job with this.
                      >>>>
                      >>>> I posted a sample here: http://www.eranaturalbeauty.com/testing/,
                      >>>> and would appreciate any ideas on how I can remove that background -
                      >>>> the client wants a plain white behind the products. Thanks!
                      >>>>
                      >>>
                      >>> For that cylindrical packs, using vector masks should be pretty easy
                      >>> and, most likely, provide the best solution.
                      >>>
                      >>> For things like leaves and fruits, Windows users may use this:
                      >>>
                      >>> http://research.graphicon.ru/image-processing/gml-matting-6.html
                      >>>
                      >>> work reasonably well. Not so perfect with packs due to low local
                      >>> contrast, but if you don't need to remove table, looks good enough to
                      >>> me.
                      >>>
                      >>> --
                      >>> Ilya Razmanov
                      >>> http://photoshop.msk.ru - Photoshop plug-in filters
                      >>
                      >>
                      >> Thank you, Ilya! I will experiment with that!
                      >>
                      >> ~ Bruce
                      >
                      > A bit late for this advice now, Bruce, but traditionally, if objects
                      > need to be close cut, the photographer would shoot them individually and
                      > use cards (black, white or gray) to help separate the object from the
                      > background. These "separators" would need to be positioned so they do
                      > not reflect in the product surface. This makes it quite easy to close
                      > cut the images with the magic wand or other matting tools. If a group
                      > arrangement is necessary, make sure that your background color choice
                      > does not appear in the products (white lids, white background) and also
                      > that the color is a neutral one, if the products are sitting on the
                      > backdrop.
                      >
                      > I was able to get some decent result in about 10 minutes by doing the
                      > following:
                      >
                      > 1 -open the image and create two duplicates.
                      > 2- On the top duplicate, apply Color Burn blend mode
                      > 3 - Select the blend object and the one directly beneath it and flatten
                      > those two objects only. This will leave you with two objects, one much
                      > darker and the other normal.
                      > 4- set your magic wad to about 22 tolerance ad start shift clicking to
                      > select the background. You may have to alter the tolerance occasionally.
                      > 5 -With the background selected, go to Select > Inverse
                      > 6 -Optionally, you can smooth the selection but no more than 1 pixel or
                      > two.
                      > 7 - Select > Save the bitmap selection. This way you can reload it if
                      > necessary.
                      > 8 -Select > Convert to Marquee to Path
                      > 9 - hide and lock the dark image so only the original shows up.
                      > 10- cut the new path
                      > 11 - Edit > Paste as mask
                      > 12- Because it's a vector mask, you can use the sub selection tool to
                      > further tweak the mask.
                      >
                      > Hope this helps.
                      • 8. Re: Removing Photo Background
                        Level 7
                        Jim,

                        Just wanted to update - I did find the Color Burn Blend tool -- that was
                        just User Error! I'm curious as to why your process takes the two layers and
                        flattens them into one? Seems like the same results could be accomplished
                        without the second layer... (no, I haven't tried it myself yet!) - what's
                        the rationale?

                        Thanks for taking the time to help! ;-)

                        ~ Bruce

                        > Jim Babbage .:CMX:. & .:Adobe Community Expert:. wrote:
                        >> MrBruce wrote:
                        >>> "Ilya Razmanov" <ilyich@ioc.ac.ru> wrote in message
                        >>> news:op.tyaesqhw6e3g07@l2.ioc.ac.ru...
                        >>>> On Fri, 07 Sep 2007 17:53:09 +0400, MrBruce
                        >>>> <mrbrucecHA@HAhotHAmail.com> wrote:
                        >>>>
                        >>>>> I need some assistance! I arranged a photoshoot for a friend/client
                        >>>>> and even purchased a small light tent kit to do the product
                        >>>>> photography for her. Having never done this before, I assumed that I'd
                        >>>>> be able to use the Magic Wand to remove the background easily because
                        >>>>> it would be a solid color.
                        >>>>>
                        >>>>> The reality is that because there isn't much contrast between parts of
                        >>>>> the products, I'm having a heck of a time with that tool. I've tried
                        >>>>> some of the techniques from Linda's books, and again, because there's
                        >>>>> not much contrast, I haven't had much luck. There's a LOT of pictures,
                        >>>>> and I dread the thought of the hours I'd have to spend with the pen
                        >>>>> tool to do a decent job with this.
                        >>>>>
                        >>>>> I posted a sample here: http://www.eranaturalbeauty.com/testing/, and
                        >>>>> would appreciate any ideas on how I can remove that background - the
                        >>>>> client wants a plain white behind the products. Thanks!
                        >>>>>
                        >> I was able to get some decent result in about 10 minutes by doing the
                        >> following:
                        >>
                        >> 1 -open the image and create two duplicates.
                        >> 2- On the top duplicate, apply Color Burn blend mode
                        >> 3 - Select the blend object and the one directly beneath it and flatten
                        >> those two objects only. This will leave you with two objects, one much
                        >> darker and the other normal.
                        >> 4- set your magic wad to about 22 tolerance ad start shift clicking to
                        >> select the background. You may have to alter the tolerance occasionally.
                        >> 5 -With the background selected, go to Select > Inverse
                        >> 6 -Optionally, you can smooth the selection but no more than 1 pixel or
                        >> two.
                        >> 7 - Select > Save the bitmap selection. This way you can reload it if
                        >> necessary.
                        >> 8 -Select > Convert to Marquee to Path
                        >> 9 - hide and lock the dark image so only the original shows up.
                        >> 10- cut the new path
                        >> 11 - Edit > Paste as mask
                        >> 12- Because it's a vector mask, you can use the sub selection tool to
                        >> further tweak the mask.

                        • 9. Re: Removing Photo Background
                          Level 7
                          deebs wrote:
                          > That is a neat technique Jim!


                          Thanks :-)

                          --
                          Jim Babbage - .:Community MX:. & .:Adobe Community Expert:.
                          Extending Knowledge, Daily
                          http://www.communityMX.com/
                          CommunityMX - Free Resources:
                          http://www.communitymx.com/free.cfm
                          ---
                          .:Adobe Community Expert for Fireworks:.
                          news://forums.macromedia.com/macromedia.fireworks
                          news://forums.macromedia.com/macromedia.dreamweaver
                          • 10. Re: Removing Photo Background
                            Level 7
                            MrBruce wrote:
                            > Jim,
                            >
                            > Just wanted to update - I did find the Color Burn Blend tool -- that was
                            > just User Error! I'm curious as to why your process takes the two layers
                            > and flattens them into one? Seems like the same results could be
                            > accomplished without the second layer... (no, I haven't tried it myself
                            > yet!) - what's the rationale?
                            >
                            > Thanks for taking the time to help! ;-)
                            >
                            > ~ Bruce
                            >
                            >> Jim Babbage .:CMX:. & .:Adobe Community Expert:. wrote:
                            >>> MrBruce wrote:
                            >>>> "Ilya Razmanov" <ilyich@ioc.ac.ru> wrote in message
                            >>>> news:op.tyaesqhw6e3g07@l2.ioc.ac.ru...
                            >>>>> On Fri, 07 Sep 2007 17:53:09 +0400, MrBruce
                            >>>>> <mrbrucecHA@HAhotHAmail.com> wrote:
                            >>>>>
                            >>>>>> I need some assistance! I arranged a photoshoot for a
                            >>>>>> friend/client and even purchased a small light tent kit to do the
                            >>>>>> product photography for her. Having never done this before, I
                            >>>>>> assumed that I'd be able to use the Magic Wand to remove the
                            >>>>>> background easily because it would be a solid color.
                            >>>>>>
                            >>>>>> The reality is that because there isn't much contrast between
                            >>>>>> parts of the products, I'm having a heck of a time with that tool.
                            >>>>>> I've tried some of the techniques from Linda's books, and again,
                            >>>>>> because there's not much contrast, I haven't had much luck.
                            >>>>>> There's a LOT of pictures, and I dread the thought of the hours
                            >>>>>> I'd have to spend with the pen tool to do a decent job with this.
                            >>>>>>
                            >>>>>> I posted a sample here: http://www.eranaturalbeauty.com/testing/,
                            >>>>>> and would appreciate any ideas on how I can remove that background
                            >>>>>> - the client wants a plain white behind the products. Thanks!
                            >>>>>>
                            >>> I was able to get some decent result in about 10 minutes by doing the
                            >>> following:
                            >>>
                            >>> 1 -open the image and create two duplicates.
                            >>> 2- On the top duplicate, apply Color Burn blend mode
                            >>> 3 - Select the blend object and the one directly beneath it and
                            >>> flatten those two objects only. This will leave you with two objects,
                            >>> one much darker and the other normal.
                            >>> 4- set your magic wad to about 22 tolerance ad start shift clicking
                            >>> to select the background. You may have to alter the tolerance
                            >>> occasionally.
                            >>> 5 -With the background selected, go to Select > Inverse
                            >>> 6 -Optionally, you can smooth the selection but no more than 1 pixel
                            >>> or two.
                            >>> 7 - Select > Save the bitmap selection. This way you can reload it if
                            >>> necessary.
                            >>> 8 -Select > Convert to Marquee to Path
                            >>> 9 - hide and lock the dark image so only the original shows up.
                            >>> 10- cut the new path
                            >>> 11 - Edit > Paste as mask
                            >>> 12- Because it's a vector mask, you can use the sub selection tool to
                            >>> further tweak the mask.
                            >

                            The difference is - I found - the wand doesn't really take into account
                            the blend so you're really just *wanding* the brightness/color values of
                            the original. When the two layers are flattened, my experience was that
                            the wand selection was faster/more accurate. But maybe I was just lucky :-)

                            --
                            Jim Babbage - .:Community MX:. & .:Adobe Community Expert:.
                            Extending Knowledge, Daily
                            http://www.communityMX.com/
                            CommunityMX - Free Resources:
                            http://www.communitymx.com/free.cfm
                            ---
                            .:Adobe Community Expert for Fireworks:.
                            news://forums.macromedia.com/macromedia.fireworks
                            news://forums.macromedia.com/macromedia.dreamweaver
                            • 11. Re: Removing Photo Background
                              Level 7
                              "Jim Babbage .:CMX:. & .:Adobe Community Expert:."
                              <jbabbage@newmediaservices.ca> wrote in message
                              news:fbt1lf$6l7$2@forums.macromedia.com...
                              > MrBruce wrote:
                              >> Jim,
                              >>
                              >> Just wanted to update - I did find the Color Burn Blend tool -- that was
                              >> just User Error! I'm curious as to why your process takes the two layers
                              >> and flattens them into one? Seems like the same results could be
                              >> accomplished without the second layer... (no, I haven't tried it myself
                              >> yet!) - what's the rationale?
                              >>
                              >> Thanks for taking the time to help! ;-)
                              >>
                              >> ~ Bruce
                              >>
                              >>> Jim Babbage .:CMX:. & .:Adobe Community Expert:. wrote:
                              >>>> MrBruce wrote:
                              >>>>> "Ilya Razmanov" <ilyich@ioc.ac.ru> wrote in message
                              >>>>> news:op.tyaesqhw6e3g07@l2.ioc.ac.ru...
                              >>>>>> On Fri, 07 Sep 2007 17:53:09 +0400, MrBruce
                              >>>>>> <mrbrucecHA@HAhotHAmail.com> wrote:
                              >>>>>>
                              >>>>>>> I need some assistance! I arranged a photoshoot for a friend/client
                              >>>>>>> and even purchased a small light tent kit to do the product
                              >>>>>>> photography for her. Having never done this before, I assumed that
                              >>>>>>> I'd be able to use the Magic Wand to remove the background easily
                              >>>>>>> because it would be a solid color.
                              >>>>>>>
                              >>>>>>> The reality is that because there isn't much contrast between parts
                              >>>>>>> of the products, I'm having a heck of a time with that tool. I've
                              >>>>>>> tried some of the techniques from Linda's books, and again, because
                              >>>>>>> there's not much contrast, I haven't had much luck. There's a LOT of
                              >>>>>>> pictures, and I dread the thought of the hours I'd have to spend
                              >>>>>>> with the pen tool to do a decent job with this.
                              >>>>>>>
                              >>>>>>> I posted a sample here: http://www.eranaturalbeauty.com/testing/,
                              >>>>>>> and would appreciate any ideas on how I can remove that background -
                              >>>>>>> the client wants a plain white behind the products. Thanks!
                              >>>>>>>
                              >>>> I was able to get some decent result in about 10 minutes by doing the
                              >>>> following:
                              >>>>
                              >>>> 1 -open the image and create two duplicates.
                              >>>> 2- On the top duplicate, apply Color Burn blend mode
                              >>>> 3 - Select the blend object and the one directly beneath it and flatten
                              >>>> those two objects only. This will leave you with two objects, one much
                              >>>> darker and the other normal.
                              >>>> 4- set your magic wad to about 22 tolerance ad start shift clicking to
                              >>>> select the background. You may have to alter the tolerance
                              >>>> occasionally.
                              >>>> 5 -With the background selected, go to Select > Inverse
                              >>>> 6 -Optionally, you can smooth the selection but no more than 1 pixel or
                              >>>> two.
                              >>>> 7 - Select > Save the bitmap selection. This way you can reload it if
                              >>>> necessary.
                              >>>> 8 -Select > Convert to Marquee to Path
                              >>>> 9 - hide and lock the dark image so only the original shows up.
                              >>>> 10- cut the new path
                              >>>> 11 - Edit > Paste as mask
                              >>>> 12- Because it's a vector mask, you can use the sub selection tool to
                              >>>> further tweak the mask.
                              >>
                              >
                              > The difference is - I found - the wand doesn't really take into account
                              > the blend so you're really just *wanding* the brightness/color values of
                              > the original. When the two layers are flattened, my experience was that
                              > the wand selection was faster/more accurate. But maybe I was just lucky
                              > :-)
                              >

                              Not lucky - SMART! It works very well, but I would never in a million years
                              have thought of using a second layer and flattening them!!! I was just
                              wondering why you thought to do it that way, and you just must have special
                              Fireworks instincts or something... Thanks again, Jim!

                              ~ Bruce

                              • 12. Re: Removing Photo Background
                                Level 7
                                MrBruce wrote:
                                > "Jim Babbage .:CMX:. & .:Adobe Community Expert:."
                                > <jbabbage@newmediaservices.ca> wrote in message
                                > news:fbt1lf$6l7$2@forums.macromedia.com...
                                >> MrBruce wrote:
                                >>> Jim,
                                >>>
                                >>> Just wanted to update - I did find the Color Burn Blend tool -- that
                                >>> was just User Error! I'm curious as to why your process takes the two
                                >>> layers and flattens them into one? Seems like the same results could
                                >>> be accomplished without the second layer... (no, I haven't tried it
                                >>> myself yet!) - what's the rationale?
                                >>>
                                >>> Thanks for taking the time to help! ;-)
                                >>>
                                >>> ~ Bruce
                                >>>
                                >>>> Jim Babbage .:CMX:. & .:Adobe Community Expert:. wrote:
                                >>>>> MrBruce wrote:
                                >>>>>> "Ilya Razmanov" <ilyich@ioc.ac.ru> wrote in message
                                >>>>>> news:op.tyaesqhw6e3g07@l2.ioc.ac.ru...
                                >>>>>>> On Fri, 07 Sep 2007 17:53:09 +0400, MrBruce
                                >>>>>>> <mrbrucecHA@HAhotHAmail.com> wrote:
                                >>>>>>>
                                >>>>>>>> I need some assistance! I arranged a photoshoot for a
                                >>>>>>>> friend/client and even purchased a small light tent kit to do
                                >>>>>>>> the product photography for her. Having never done this before,
                                >>>>>>>> I assumed that I'd be able to use the Magic Wand to remove the
                                >>>>>>>> background easily because it would be a solid color.
                                >>>>>>>>
                                >>>>>>>> The reality is that because there isn't much contrast between
                                >>>>>>>> parts of the products, I'm having a heck of a time with that
                                >>>>>>>> tool. I've tried some of the techniques from Linda's books, and
                                >>>>>>>> again, because there's not much contrast, I haven't had much
                                >>>>>>>> luck. There's a LOT of pictures, and I dread the thought of the
                                >>>>>>>> hours I'd have to spend with the pen tool to do a decent job
                                >>>>>>>> with this.
                                >>>>>>>>
                                >>>>>>>> I posted a sample here:
                                >>>>>>>> http://www.eranaturalbeauty.com/testing/, and would appreciate
                                >>>>>>>> any ideas on how I can remove that background - the client wants
                                >>>>>>>> a plain white behind the products. Thanks!
                                >>>>>>>>
                                >>>>> I was able to get some decent result in about 10 minutes by doing
                                >>>>> the following:
                                >>>>>
                                >>>>> 1 -open the image and create two duplicates.
                                >>>>> 2- On the top duplicate, apply Color Burn blend mode
                                >>>>> 3 - Select the blend object and the one directly beneath it and
                                >>>>> flatten those two objects only. This will leave you with two
                                >>>>> objects, one much darker and the other normal.
                                >>>>> 4- set your magic wad to about 22 tolerance ad start shift clicking
                                >>>>> to select the background. You may have to alter the tolerance
                                >>>>> occasionally.
                                >>>>> 5 -With the background selected, go to Select > Inverse
                                >>>>> 6 -Optionally, you can smooth the selection but no more than 1
                                >>>>> pixel or two.
                                >>>>> 7 - Select > Save the bitmap selection. This way you can reload it
                                >>>>> if necessary.
                                >>>>> 8 -Select > Convert to Marquee to Path
                                >>>>> 9 - hide and lock the dark image so only the original shows up.
                                >>>>> 10- cut the new path
                                >>>>> 11 - Edit > Paste as mask
                                >>>>> 12- Because it's a vector mask, you can use the sub selection tool
                                >>>>> to further tweak the mask.
                                >>>
                                >>
                                >> The difference is - I found - the wand doesn't really take into
                                >> account the blend so you're really just *wanding* the brightness/color
                                >> values of the original. When the two layers are flattened, my
                                >> experience was that the wand selection was faster/more accurate. But
                                >> maybe I was just lucky :-)
                                >>
                                >
                                > Not lucky - SMART! It works very well, but I would never in a million
                                > years have thought of using a second layer and flattening them!!! I was
                                > just wondering why you thought to do it that way, and you just must have
                                > special Fireworks instincts or something... Thanks again, Jim!
                                >
                                > ~ Bruce

                                Just observations made while using the wand. It did not appear to be
                                making any better selections with the blended, unflattened layer than it
                                did with the normal layer. :-)

                                --
                                Jim Babbage - .:Community MX:. & .:Adobe Community Expert:.
                                Extending Knowledge, Daily
                                http://www.communityMX.com/
                                CommunityMX - Free Resources:
                                http://www.communitymx.com/free.cfm
                                ---
                                .:Adobe Community Expert for Fireworks:.
                                news://forums.macromedia.com/macromedia.fireworks
                                news://forums.macromedia.com/macromedia.dreamweaver