10 Replies Latest reply on Apr 11, 2010 9:24 AM by Wade_Zimmerman

    Stroke

    myjkem2 Level 1

      I can't figure this out, I even tried the help files.

      Can someone explain simply to me (I'm new at this program) how to apply a black stroke to some turquiose text.

        • 1. Re: Stroke
          Jacob Bugge MVP & Adobe Community Professional

          myjkem,

           

          Presuming you have Live Type, you may click the flyout in the Appearance Palette and tick Add New Stroke; that will give you a 1pt stroke on top of each letter, half of the stroke outside the letter, half of it covering part of the fill. In the palette you may mover it down below to hide the inner half beneath the fill. You may change the Stroke Weight in the Stroke palette/panel.

          • 2. Re: Stroke
            Wade_Zimmerman Level 6

            Select the text with either the direct select or selection tool or the text tool or lasso tool then select the stroke proxy then select black as the color in eithether the swatch or  color panel or double click the stroke proxy to bring up the picker and select balck and click ok.

             

            You can also select the stroke proxy in the color panel. If you want to add more than one stroke you can do that using the appearance panel as written above. But no need to do that for one stroke.

             

            Screen shot 2010-04-10 at 8.36.35 PM.png

             

            Screen-shot-2010-04-10-at-8.36.59-PM.jpg

             

            Screen shot 2010-04-10 at 8.37.08 PM.png

            • 3. Re: Stroke
              JETalmage-71mYin Level 3

              It is almost always bad practice (a dead-giveaway of amateurish work) to add a basic stroke to type by simply selecting the Stroke button in the Toolbox and applying a Stroke color because, in Illustrator, such a stroke is always stacked in front of the fill. Half of the stroke therefore lies within the shapes of the characters, "choking" their shapes. Except in certain cases (ex: creating a manual spread trap), type should not be treated that way. It wrecks the design of the typeface.

               

              Instead, do as Jacob suggested:

               

              1. Select the text object.

              2. Appearance palette flyout menu: Add New Stroke.

              3. Appearance palette: Drag the Stroke listing to below the Characters listing.

               

              JET

              • 4. Re: Stroke
                Jacob Bugge MVP & Adobe Community Professional

                Thank you for the correction, James; Character, of course.

                • 5. Re: Stroke
                  Wade_Zimmerman Level 6

                  JETalmage wrote:

                   

                  It is almost always bad practice (a dead-giveaway of amateurish work) to add a basic stroke to type by simply selecting the Stroke button in the Toolbox and applying a Stroke color because, in Illustrator, such a stroke is always stacked in front of the fill. Half of the stroke therefore lies within the shapes of the characters, "choking" their shapes. Except in certain cases (ex: creating a manual spread trap), type should not be treated that way. It wrecks the design of the typeface.

                   

                   

                  According to this user it is a bad idea but there is no reason to conclude that is true except in this user's mind.

                   

                  The design of outline fonts are usually done with the stroke entirely inside the form of the character. You can offset the stroke if you wish and when adding a stroke via the appearance panel it aligns it to the middle of the stroke so you have the double the weight of the stroke.

                   

                  Yes there are issues when adding a stroke to text but as a designer these re decisions you make and as you know there are no such rules as the quoted user states.

                   

                  What they mean is there are other ways of going about this depending on what you want to achieve. And what you want to achieve is the only thing that determines the rules.

                  • 6. Re: Stroke
                    Wade_Zimmerman Level 6

                    The major problem with adding a stroke to the text is that it will change the size of the font so it will not match any font of the same font size.

                     

                    And it will be very hard to get it to the right font size unless it was designed as an outline font and keep the font live.

                     

                    As a display font it will be fine as art it will be fine if you need it to match running text that will be a judgment call. But you wil be the only one who can make that call.

                    • 7. Re: Stroke
                      JETalmage-71mYin Level 3
                      According to this user...

                       

                      And every other serious designer on the planet with any understanding of type design.

                       

                      You can offset the stroke if you wish...

                       

                      Really? Let's see you do this with a basic stroke applied to text.

                       

                      JET

                      • 8. Re: Stroke
                        Wade_Zimmerman Level 6

                        Ridiculous

                         

                        To the OP you can of course also outline the text by selecting the text with the direct select or selection tool and going to Type>Create outlines the text will not be live but you can give it a stroke and offset the stroke or use the stroke alignment options in the stroke panel to place the stroke entirely outside or entirely inside the type body.

                         

                        BTW I have designed material and exhibits for some pretty heavy clients, like MoMA, IBM, American Airlines, GAF, AT&T and set up the type guides for Aaron Burns, the people who brought us the typositor. I have consulted some pretty well known design firms as well and my opinion was pretty well respected.

                         

                        It is design there are no rules!

                        • 9. Re: Stroke
                          JETalmage-71mYin Level 3
                          It is design there are no rules!

                           

                          Design, as any other discipline, has rules. Otherwise, by definition, it would not be a discipline. The fact that writing, for another example, is an art doesn't mean that grammar has no rules.

                           

                          JET

                          • 10. Re: Stroke
                            Wade_Zimmerman Level 6

                            You have all the approaches o adding a stroke to text so you can choose which you need and feel serves your purpose.

                             

                            I hope some of what was written helps you.