3 Replies Latest reply on Apr 18, 2010 11:08 AM by JETalmage-71mYin

    How to create a very small design for a printing house

    relzi1337

      Hey,

       

      I'm creating some designs to be printed on contact lenses.

      Now, the designs are @ 14.8mm size, which is ofcourse rather small.

      When i'm working, the size is set to the normal (14.8mm) on 1200% zoom.

      And when i'm enlarging it to 100%, it all gets messed up.. especially the brushes, and the thickness of everything, strokes etc'.

      If I'm not mistaken, when printing something in a printing house, it should be in a big resolution, in order to get maximum quality.

       

      Seeking some advice on how to create it on the best part, so it will be 1:1 quality on the printing part.

       

      (I know I could just ask the manufacturer.. but it's complicated, because they don't speak very good English, They are Koreans).

       

      Thanks in advance.

        • 1. Re: How to create a very small design for a printing house
          JETalmage-71mYin Level 3

          The description doesn't make sense.

           

          When i'm working, the size is set to the normal (14.8mm) on 1200% zoom.

           

          I'll take this to mean you are drawing the graphics at actual-size (14.8), but are working at 1200% zoom.

           

          And when i'm enlarging it to 100%, it all gets messed up especially the brushes, and the thickness of everything, strokes etc'.

           

          What does "enlarging it to 100% mean? If you're just changing the zoom in Illustrator from 1200% to 100%, you're not "enlarging" anything, and you're not actually changing the artwork at all. If you're scaling the artwork, then whether live Brushes and Strokes are also scaled is conrtolled by the Scale Strokes & Effects setting, available in the Transform Palette's flyout menu.

           

          JET

          • 2. Re: How to create a very small design for a printing house
            relzi1337 Level 1

            Well, as you said, what I meant was that i'm working on the actual-size of the graphic @ 1200% zoom, and when i'm Scaling the design to be larger, on a 100% zoom, everything gets abit messy.

             

            I can work out with the strokes, but what seems to be a problem is scaling Brushes.. They aren't staying at the same place nor shape.

            Lets say I got a brush of a Tree, when scaling from 1200% to 100% size, it will look like.. a rock? ^_^

             

            I'd still like to get an answer regarding my painting house quality questions..

             

            Thanks!

            • 3. Re: How to create a very small design for a printing house
              JETalmage-71mYin Level 3
              Lets say I got a brush of a Tree, when scaling from 1200% to 100% size, it will look like.. a rock?

               

              I answered that in the previous post. Stroke weight controls the scaling of Brushes (assuming you are, in fact, talking about Illustrator Brushes). Whether Stroke weight changes when you scale the paths is controlled by the Scale Strokes & Effects setting, which you can find in the flyout menu of the Transform Palette.

               

              If I'm not mistaken, when printing something in a printing house, it should be in a big resolution, in order to get maximum quality.

               

              Vector paths have no "resolution." They are resolution-independent. That's one of the main reasons for their existence.

               

              Seeking some advice on how to create it on the best part, so it will be 1:1 quality on the printing part.

               

              Most likely, you could work the vector design at any comfortable size, indicate in your communication to the printing house a single dimension (ex: "Illustration must be scaled to 4.8 mm in height") and deliver it. I would think that a contact lens manufacturer knows the necessary size/placement restrictions for something to actually be etched or printed on a contact lens, and can accommodate the necessary scaling of the artwork. I would further think that your primary concern should be the appropriate amount of detail in a design to be rendered so small. It's hard for me to imagine a design that small for which I would be using Brushes.

               

              JET

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