3 Replies Latest reply on May 14, 2010 5:10 PM by shooternz

    Subtitle File Format

    Filmmaker78 Level 1

      I have an interview that we filmed in a foreign language. I'm having it subtitled now so that I can edit into my film (I have no idea what the interviewee is saying without the subtitles). The company doing the subtitling for me has offered three file formats:  .tif  -  .son  -  .sst.

       

      I don't know if any of those will work in a Premiere timeline, or which one is the best choice. Ideas? I'm editing in HD.

        • 1. Re: Subtitle File Format
          pebalsamo Level 2

          dorseymkt wrote:

           

          I have an interview that we filmed in a foreign language. I'm having it subtitled now so that I can edit into my film (I have no idea what the interviewee is saying without the subtitles). The company doing the subtitling for me has offered three file formats:  .tif  -  .son  -  .sst.

           

          I don't know if any of those will work in a Premiere timeline, or which one is the best choice. Ideas? I'm editing in HD.

           

          I am assuming that you gave them a timecoded file.  If you still have the sequence that you used for that timecoded file and they made a .tif sequence of stills off of that, then you could import that .tif sequence into Premiere (I am guessing).  I have never done it that way, any subtitles that I have done have been from english to other languages, so I sent them a timecoded copy of my finished product and they sent me a .sst file.  I then put that into Encore to make the CC Subtitles.  I have never done it any way within Premiere.

           

          You could ask them to send you all 3 files, and if not have them send the .sst file and then you can open that along with your video file in Subtitle Workshop (Free Download) and view the video with the subtitles on it.

           

          Let us know how it goes...

           

          Phil

          1 person found this helpful
          • 2. Re: Subtitle File Format
            Filmmaker78 Level 1

            Thanks, Phil. Correct, I sent them a video file with timecode burned in.

             

            What I want is for them to give me a file that I can lay into my timeline over the video, just like a text file. Then I'd the option of exporting the video with the subtitles burned into video, but retain the ability to export "clean" video for international distribution later. It's not the kind of subtitling I want the audience to have the option of turning off themselves, though.

             

            I think asking them to deliver all three file formats is the best bet - then I can try out what works best. I'll post my conclusion here when I have it figured out.

             

            Mike

            • 3. Re: Subtitle File Format
              shooternz Level 6

              The tiff should work fine if it has an alpha channel embedded.