9 Replies Latest reply on Aug 3, 2010 3:08 PM by SFL46

    Question regarding Encore & MPEG2

    dreamache101 Level 1

      Ok so I created a quick "test" animation in AE CS4, exported it as an uncompressed AVI at 1920x1200 and the result is a very crisp / high quality clip.

       

      I take it into Adobe Encore CS5, I specify NTSC MPEG2 DVD. When I preview it, the quality of the clip is inferior. Part of red text on a black background does not look crisp (rather blurry) and other edges are not clear.  Why is this?  I had the same issue yesterday before I purchased Premiere CS5, while burning a disk with windows movie maker and using the same settings. It looked like complete crap on my 46" 1080p HDTV.

       

      My entire goal is to have my videos equivalent to the quality that you see on major commercials in HD.  Standard DVD has the capability right??

       

      I've also tried exporting from AE in MPEG2 DVD format and ended up with the same result.  Help?

        • 1. Re: Question regarding Encore & MPEG2
          Stan Jones Adobe Community Professional & MVP

          You are taking a high pixel image, bringing it down to 720x480 ( or similar) - you're making a DVD not a blu-ray.  Depending on how you made the animation, that is probably your problem.  Letters/lines that look good with all the resolution may be too thin when down-rezed.

           

          My entire goal is to have my videos equivalent to the quality that you see on major commercials in HD.  Standard DVD has the capability right?

           

          How could it?  It's SD, not HD.

          • 2. Re: Question regarding Encore & MPEG2
            dreamache101 Level 1

            You are taking a high pixel image, bringing it down to 720x480 ( or similar) - you're making a DVD not a blu-ray.  Depending on how you made the animation, that is probably your problem.  Letters/lines that look good with all the resolution may be too thin when down-rezed.

             

            I went ahead and resized my comp in AE to 720x480 to match the MPEG2 DVD dimensions in Encore. Exported an uncompressed AVI and imported to Encore. When I drag the clip into Encore, it looks like the image on the left "simon" (crisp as it should be), when I go to File / Preview in Encore, the "simon" on the right is what I'm presented with, which looks like absolute garbage, and looks the same on my TV.  I know TV won't be 100% crisp, but there's no way it should look *this bad*.

            beforeafter.jpg

            How could it?  It's SD, not HD.

             

             

            Well I'm new to this video stuff, I'm more of a web designer - So excuse me if this sounds absolutely retarded, but if that's true, how can DVD's give you movies in HD?

            • 3. Re: Question regarding Encore & MPEG2
              Stan Jones Adobe Community Professional & MVP

              Don't judge by the Encore preview.  I agree the image should look better.  Have you transcoded yet?  What datarate?  How are you watching this on your TV?

               

              Well I'm new to this video stuff, I'm more of a web designer - So excuse me if this sounds absolutely retarded, but if that's true, how can DVD's give you movies in HD?

              They don't; some players uprez and do a pretty good job of it.  But the DVD is playing an SD movie.  (There is a method for burning short bluray format movies to DVDs, but that is not what you are describing.)

               

              I never did get good looking animation  using AVI export, but I see no reason you should not be seeing a better SD version.

              • 4. Re: Question regarding Encore & MPEG2
                dreamache101 Level 1

                I had a slight feeling it could have something to do with the red color itself... So I changed the text from red to this blue, exported them both as mpeg-2 dvd's in AE, imported both to Encore.. (didn't have to transcode since they're already mpeg2), and look at the screenshot:

                 

                beforeafter2.jpg

                 

                It's the red color for some reason which is getting distorted, and it's not only on the black background, it's also on a white background that it gets distorted as well. Very strange, but I'm a developer and the same issue occurs with a script I wrote in which PHP resizes images - Every time I have bright red on black background, it gets distorted..

                 

                Hm..

                • 5. Re: Question regarding Encore & MPEG2
                  Stan Jones Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                  yes, odd.  No time to play with this yet....

                  • 6. Re: Question regarding Encore & MPEG2
                    fordchevyman Level 1

                    Red is a color that NTSC does not like at all, some shades of red work ok but not great. There are a few other colors in the specturm that distort like this. Not sure but this is an age old problem that is commonly known. I stay away from red text and images that have alot of red. Now if you video a red color with a Canon XH-A1 lets say like I do and edit with in premiere pro, red is always good never does that becasue the camera is translating the red to a red color that is acceptable to NTSC. But for some reason beyond my knowledge any animated image or text with a red color bleeds just like that. For example I shot a dance recital and the school had a nice image of a cartoon stage with a red curtain. I thought it would be nice to do some titling with that. It was a tiff image and the red curtain was so unusable I did not use it. When I was editing it was close enough that it looked ok if I kept the curtain close in and not far out. Far out the curtain was real interlaced looking like your sample, close in it was not. Well when I made a test DVD it was way worse. So I had to re-edited that intro to get the red curtain out. I found that some dark blues do the same. Some colors do a great job for clarity I find yellow on black does very good. It's something you have to play with It's always good to have an output monitor connected to a 3rd party output card to view on a TV to see what your going to get before you complete your editing. Although I do have this and it still came out worse on the DVD than what was showing up on my output monitor. I think because DVD is compressed as where I was editing with uncompressed avi.

                     

                    Hope that helps, just stay away from red on your animations.

                    • 8. Re: Question regarding Encore & MPEG2
                      fordchevyman Level 1

                      Giving an outline on red text will help some but you'll still get it a little color bleed. But if red text is what you got to have on a black background try using a white outline and see if that improves. I'm still thinking your going to get a little color bleed from the red. But if you make the text big enough you may have success.

                       

                      I like white text myself, you can never go wrong wth white. It contrast well when you put a black outline around the white text and matches with any color scheme in your project. I recommend white if you have a project that need to be done and you don't have time to play with color.

                       

                      Also recommended are pastel colors, these work well with NTSC. Baby or light blues and yellows work great, orange even works well.

                       

                      I'm going to try a test later and see what I come up with when trying red text with white outline, I just remebered in the past not having any luck with red text or images with red in them.

                      • 9. Re: Question regarding Encore & MPEG2
                        SFL46 Level 3

                        It is important to note that the while an animation can be created with

                        RGB colors that range from 0-255, and could appear well on a computer monitor,

                        NTSC does not handle this range--it only handles something on the order of 35-235 (look it up) A lot of this has to do with the genesis of the early days of TV.  While the limitations no longer strictly apply, they persist because of the need for standardization.

                         

                        Someone mentioned photoshop--there is a filter in PSP that limits the NTSC color to be "broadcast safe."

                         

                        Another thing to consider, the color gamut for NTSC is a whole lot smaller than the AdobeRGB gamut in PSP--colors beyond the gamut are degraded.