1 2 Previous Next 52 Replies Latest reply on Jul 25, 2011 9:00 AM by LaciG

    Best media for long term archival purposes?

    LaciG Level 1

      Browsing the Internet, I have come across several (and partially contradictory) suggestions for the 'best' (longest lasting, with good error correction algorithm, etc.) DVD media. The final conclusion of one of the more competently sounding tutorial (http://adterrasperaspera.com/blog/2006/10/30/how-to-choose-cddvd-archival-media)  is: "...So, what am I using? Due to Taiyo Yuden’s superior media quality, and DVD+R’s superior design, I use only Taiyo Yuden DVD+R media. I recommend this media to everyone who wishes to keep their data for a long, long time." Based on the high level of expertise of many users in these forums, I would greatly appreciate any suggestions/comments/references. Thanks, as always, Laci.

        • 1. Re: Best media for long term archival purposes?
          the_wine_snob Level 9

          I also use Taiyo Yuden and Verbatim. I happen to have DVD-5's in Taiyo Yuden and my DVD-9's in Verbatim. For delivery, I have never had one return.

           

          Now, one of the problems, when looking into the future is that some not quite real world tests have to be developed to accelerate the "aging," often using computer models to simulate that aging. How long will they last? Most labs indicate 50+ years, which is not bad.

           

          I do recommend using cases, that do not allow the disc's surface to contact any surface in the case, basically holding it away. I also recommend storing away from many environment elements and especially UV light.

           

          Some like the adhesive labels, but I am not a fan, and will use Eposn inks. Now, how long will those last, before doing any damage? Who knows?

           

          Good luck,

           

          Hunt

          • 2. Re: Best media for long term archival purposes?
            LaciG Level 1

            Thanks Bill! I needed this encouragement before I order the Taiyo Yuden (not the cheapest!) DVD-s.

             

            BTW, in the last two years of my professional career, I worked for Intel and Numonyx as a reliability engineer/physicist to characterize the data retention of Phase Change Memories under development (and now for sale). These memories utilize the differences in the physical (used in RAM) and optical (used in DVD) properties of the crystalline and amorphous states of chalcogenide glass. One of the most important factor in data retention is the temperature. This very same (and strong) temperature dependence is also used for creating reliability models that can be used to predict the survival probability of the memory unit. As you said, however, it is really only a prediction (based on the assumption that the degradation model is valid down to the use temperature).

             

            One more question: What are DVD-5 and DVD-9?

             

            Thanks, Laci.

            • 3. Re: Best media for long term archival purposes?
              John T Smith Adobe Community Professional & MVP

              Single and Dual layer

              • 4. Re: Best media for long term archival purposes?
                the_wine_snob Level 9

                Sorry about the nomenclature. DVD-5 is a 4.7 single-sided, single layer DVD, and DVD-9 is an 8.5 single-sided, double-layer.

                 

                It sounds like you understand the longevity testing routines, far better than I ever will. As for the T-Y's, I am well into my second 1000, and I have never had an error, or a problem. With fewer discs burned from the 500 Verbatim DL's, I have never had a failure there either, plus I probably burned 500 Verbatim DVD-5's, with zero errors.

                 

                I use the matte white printables for both brands, and they take ink (Epson 1900R) very well. I usually allow to air dry for about 1 hour, but in AZ, that would dry about anything. I have tested the T-Y Water-shield, and they printed well too, but I have about 300-400 matte whites, so I will likely not order for awhile. Some have had drying issues with the Water-shield discs, and some have found them to scratch too easily, but my tests indicated that they were fine with the Epson inks. Still not sure if I like the semi-gloss surface for purely aesthetic reasons, but then I am a "status quo" sort of person, and new looks can take a bit, to really sink in. Hated the Mercedes S-550s' rear-quarter panels, when introduced, but just bough one with the full AMG package for my wife, and find that either that look has grown on me, or maybe MB made enough changes to get things aesthetically pleasing. Originally, I thought that it looked like a Maybach, and that is not a visually pleasing auto to me. Maybe the Water-shield will "grow on me?"

                 

                Going back a bit, John T. Smith, a frequent contributor here, and also someone on Muvipix, brought up reports of counterfeit T-Y's, but I have never been able to find any proof of those. Do not know if it's an urban legend, started by Memorex (grin), or if some resellers actually sold some. I'd think that I'd have found proof, if that had happened. I care about such things, because I recommend T-Y's in a half-dozen articles and over 100 posts, so it does matter to me.

                 

                Good luck,

                 

                Hunt

                1 person found this helpful
                • 5. Re: Best media for long term archival purposes?
                  nealeh Level 5

                  Technology change creates an issue of how long is 'long term'. Consider what might have been recommended in 1960 (fifty years ago) and then think what may be in use by 2060 (fifty years ahead). Even a shorter timeframe would have seen 5 1/4" discs recommended then displaced by 3 1/2" then displaced by CD and so forth. Also consider the variety of tape based storage systems used.

                   

                  The British Museum implemented a major archiving project last century and, so it is said, now struggles to maintain the obsolete equipment needed to access it.

                   

                  Cheers,
                  --
                  Neale
                  Insanity is hereditary, you get it from your children

                  • 6. Re: Best media for long term archival purposes?
                    the_wine_snob Level 9

                    Neale,

                     

                    You make a great point. I have several backup tape formats, and only the last two can be accessed without actually building a DOS 4-5 machine. I have SyQuest 22, 44, 88 and 200 discs plus SyJet and the 1.5GB units, that I can still hook up to my remaining SCSI machine, just to retrieve data from those.

                     

                    Then, there are the CD's, but so far those work fine. For some, that were done with Roxio's old DLA, I do have only one machine that will read those, as it still has a copy of that old version of Roxio on it.

                     

                    Lot's of trouble, as technology speeds along.

                     

                    Thanks for mentioning this,

                     

                    Hunt

                    • 7. Re: Best media for long term archival purposes?
                      LaciG Level 1

                      Many thanks Bill and Neale for all the good information here regarding archiving. Basically all three relevant issues were addressed: 1. quality, 2. reliability ('quality over time') and 3. equipment obsolescence. (As for the numbers of layers, my physicist gut feeling would prefer slightly the single layer over the dual layer .) I will use TY with DVD-5, as Bill suggested. I want my daughter and her family to be able to see her growing up (and to see her parents' and grandparents' digitally saved early black and white photos). Putting together the information/suggestions, the conclusion: The DVD should last till the new technology (solid-state memory, holographic memory, etc.) arrives in order to be copied onto the new media. (Fortunately, I am not dealing with the amount of material kept in the British Museum .) The labeling is a different (and also complex) question. Since - so far - I only make a dozen or so family and friends DVDs a year, I do not want to invest in label printers (yet). On the other hand, I have heard bad reviews on the stick on labels: having different heat expansion coefficient from that of the disc, they can cause warping with changing temperature. Although, I haven't heard any quantitative study/estimate of this effect, so it might be negligible. What about LightScribe?

                       

                      Bill, you always bring up things which I am not familiar (probably due to the fact that I grew up and lived in Hungary till moving to the US in 1980): 'Mercedes S-550s' rear-quarter panels', and  'Maybach' - what is this?

                       

                      Thanks for all the good information,

                       

                      - Laci.

                      • 8. Re: Best media for long term archival purposes?
                        the_wine_snob Level 9

                        Here is an image of a similar Rear Quarter Panel treatment for the 2010 S-Class AMG. This was from a leaked 2009 image, and the final 2010 made changes:

                        2010_MB_S-Class_AMG.jpg

                        Here is the 2010 Maybach. It's Rear Quarter Panel has been greatly soften, since its introduction. There was more hard-edged sculpting earlier on:

                        2010_Maybach.jpg

                         

                        Hope that this helps.

                         

                        BTW - for most clients, when I transfer their VHS tapes, I will do an un-edited direct copy to DVD, for archival purposes. Then, I will edit, and do a DVD of that material. This gives them their original VHS tapes, an archival DVD (editing the MPEG-2 is obviously not ideal, but can be done), and then the edited DVD.

                         

                        I think that DVD will be around for at least another generation, or two, like VHS decks are still available, though in much smaller numbers.

                         

                        Remember, that is just a guess on my part, but I would hold onto a favorite DVD player - just in case.

                         

                        Hunt

                        1 person found this helpful
                        • 9. Re: Best media for long term archival purposes?
                          Ed.Macke Level 3

                          PMJI,


                          I'd  like to second Bill & Co's suggestion of using Taiyo-Yuden. I've been using them for years and (knock wood) haven't had a media-related failure yet - which I can't say about other brands (even "brand" names like TDK, Memorex, Sony, etc.).


                          I had heard a couple of things about stick-on labels. One was that they could cause the disc to become unbalanced while spinning at high speeds (which would probably apply more to CDs than DVDs). The other was that if the label came unglued while the disc was in the drive, that would not be a good thing - either you'd end up with label debris all over the inside of your drive, or it wouldn't be able to be ejected. How much of this is true, I don't know. I will say this: I've never seen anything that recommended putting labels on!


                          As far as DVD printers, some low-end inkjet printers have CD/DVD printing capability, so it might not be as expensive as you think. I've had a HP D5160 Photosmart printer for years that I actually bought for photo printing, but it just happens to also have CD/DVD printing capability - and it was only around $100. The software stinks, but it's absolutely worth the hassle to get nice-looking DVDs. So next time you're looking for an inkjet printer, do a little research and find one that has DVD printing capability - for some reason it's not a highly advertised feature so you might have to read the fine print of the tech specs.

                           

                          If you want, get the TY "printable" DVDs - they are only a few cents more. If you never get a DVD-capable printer, you'll still have a nice, white surface you can write on. If you do get a DVD printer someday, you'll be all set.


                          One thing to note is that printable blanks can either be "hub printable" or not. "Hub printable" means you can print all the way up to the hole in the middle - that's better, IMO. Otherwise you have a 1/2-inch or so of unprintable area surrounding the hole.

                           

                          FWIW, I haven't really met anybody who liked the look of Lightscribe DVDs, but that's a personal thing. Obviously, though, you'd have to have a DVD burner that supports it.

                          • 10. Re: Best media for long term archival purposes?
                            the_wine_snob Level 9

                            You might want to ask the Lightscribe question on the Muvipix Community forum, as several subscribers there use them. I never have, so really cannot comment on them.

                             

                            Sorry that I missed that, in my auto image search...

                             

                            Hunt

                             

                            PS - I have probably read many of the articles to which Ed alludes, regarding the adhesive labels. I have not used them, since CD days, so again cannot comment. Still, the two possible negatives most often stated are the out-of-balance, but also reports of the vehicle in the adhesives penetrating the upper strata of the disc, and impacting the dye layer.

                             

                            Still, some users here swear by the adhesive labels and state no issues.

                            • 11. Re: Best media for long term archival purposes?
                              LaciG Level 1

                              I just placed an order for a Taiyo Yuden White Inkjet Hub Printable Single Layer 16X DVD+R Media 100 Pack in Tape Wrap on the Super Media Store Web page.

                              I guess at this point, there is nothing I don't know about media quality, reliability and labeling, thanks to Bill, Ed, Neale and John . (I have been using the Avery adhesive labels, but I will probably go with the inkjet in the future. And 5 packs of those labels would probably pay for an inexpensive printer!).

                              - Laci.

                              • 12. Re: Best media for long term archival purposes?
                                the_wine_snob Level 9

                                I use Super Media Store too, and they have been 100% for all of my orders.

                                 

                                One comment - PrE does its burns based on the max speed of the media, and also the max speed of the burner. I am a big fan of doing slower burn, such as at 4x. PrE will not allow one to adjust this. I would like to recommend the great, free burning utility, ImgBurn, for the physical burning. One would first Burn to Folder from PrE, and then use ImgBurn, and slow down the burn speed to 4x - 6x.

                                 

                                Good luck,

                                 

                                Hunt

                                • 13. Re: Best media for long term archival purposes?
                                  nealeh Level 5

                                  I can highly recommend Canon Pixma printers with CD Burning. It  has a special CD tray and software to print directly to printable CD/DVD media. The Pixma inks are "ChromaLife 100". Apparently this should last one hundred years (I wonder how they test that?). My specific model is the Pixma iP6700D.

                                   

                                  Cheers,
                                  --
                                  Neale
                                  Insanity is hereditary, you get it from your children

                                  • 14. Re: Best media for long term archival purposes?
                                    the_wine_snob Level 9

                                    Neale,

                                     

                                    Many recommend the Canon units. Unfortunately, until fairly recently, they were not available in the US, as there was some sort of patent issue, and only Epsons could print CD/DVD's. Not sure exactly what happened, but either a patent was overruled, or expired. Now, the US consumer has more choices. Still, I happen to like my Epsons, and used them from back before there were others here. Glad to hear that the Canons are still ranking high.

                                     

                                    Thanks,

                                     

                                    Hunt

                                    • 15. Re: Best media for long term archival purposes?
                                      LaciG Level 1

                                      Bill, Neale, I think I have enough information about quality and labeling for the near future. I will buy one of the printers (as soon as the Dow goes back to at least 11,000 ). Also, I have been using the 'burn to file' with PrE since the times when disks/burner software/burners were not as good as today and I had to restart the encoding a few times after several hours when the burning crashed (usually in the middle of the night ). I use Nero Light presently and I set a lower than the maximum burning speed. (On my new computer that I am about to build, I will use ImgBurn or a similar software that doesn't want to take over my computer, my life and the whole world like Nero.) Regards, Laci.

                                      • 16. Re: Best media for long term archival purposes?
                                        the_wine_snob Level 9

                                        Good luck, and please report your success!

                                         

                                        Hunt

                                        • 17. Re: Best media for long term archival purposes?
                                          LaciG Level 1

                                          Just one question for Ed: Right now, I use Avery labels and labeling software. When you say that the Hp software  'stinks', does this mean that the Hp D5160 labeling software can't do the same as Avery (lettering, background, importing JPG pictures, etc.)? I did some Internet search for the printers you and Bill are suggesting but couldn't find any information on their labeling software. Thanks, Laci.

                                          • 18. Re: Best media for long term archival purposes?
                                            John T Smith Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                                            I don't use labels so have no way to verify this... but I have read that putting a stickon label on a disc is a bad idea due to balance issues when the disc is spinning

                                             

                                            You might want to consider discs with a printable surface, and an inkjet printer with a disc printing setting and tray to hold the discs

                                            • 19. Re: Best media for long term archival purposes?
                                              the_wine_snob Level 9

                                              I can only vouch for the "stinkiness" of the Epson labeling software (HP's with DVD printing capabilities are relatively new to the US market), but the Epson software is limited. It will only work with JPEG (and a few other still image formats), but NOT with PSD's, the native PS format.

                                               

                                              To get around this, I will use other programs, to get things to where I want them. I'll set up the Project in PS, and perhaps also use Illustrator to do the creation. I have a CD/DVD "template" for my layout, and will create my PSD and Save that with all my Layers, for future editing. Then, when I am done, I'll do a Save_As JPEG, and Import that as my background into the Epson program, where I will add a bit of type. This is especially true of when I have many different DVD's in a "set." All of the backgrounds will be created in PS/AI and then just the unique text for that disc will done in Epson.

                                               

                                              I would assume that the HP software is similar to that from Epson, but only an HP user can verify.

                                               

                                              Good luck,

                                               

                                              Hunt

                                              • 20. Re: Best media for long term archival purposes?
                                                LaciG Level 1

                                                Well, I haven't gotten around to buy a CD/DVD label printer yet - I am busy with planning, and ordering parts for, my new editing computer. The LG Blu-ray writer (WH10LS30) has arrived, and I installed it on an older computer temporarily just to see how it works. The first short HD 'movie' (edited on the old machine with PrE 7 ) came out perfect (although the transcoding and burning of the 20 minute footage took about 2 hours on that machine ).

                                                 

                                                My question is the same regarding Blu-ray BD-R and BD rewritable as it was about DVDs: Do we have any information on BD disks quality/(long term) reliability? Is there a (few) best brand(s)? Thanks, Laci.

                                                • 21. Re: Best media for long term archival purposes?
                                                  Ed.Macke Level 3
                                                  I would assume that the HP software is similar [in "stinkiness"] to that from Epson, but only an HP user can verify.

                                                   

                                                  I can vouch for the "stinkiness" of the HP labeling software.


                                                  Basically, you can add a picture and put text in a single block that's in a pre-determined position. That's about it.  I know it supports JPG; I've never tried  anything else, but I'd be surprised if it supported anything besides JPG.

                                                   

                                                  The word "rudimentary" comes to mind, but I think the software would have to actually improve to reach that level! For anything fancier than changing the  color/size/font of the text, I do the same as you: create the image in  PS, save it as JPG, and use that as the "picture" in the HP  software.

                                                   

                                                  Having said that, however, the rudimentary stuff is usually fine for my "home movies".  A DVD printed with a snapshot and something like "Disney World 2006" is still WAY more impressive than writing on it with a Sharpie or using stick-on labels!


                                                  • 22. Re: Best media for long term archival purposes?
                                                    the_wine_snob Level 9

                                                    Ed,

                                                     

                                                    That pretty much sums up my appraisal of the Epson software, and is why I do the initial layout in PS and AI first, and then just use Epson as an interface to my printer. I admit that this is not the ideal workflow, but I am accustomed to using many programs to accomplish my end result, so it bothers me less, than it might others.

                                                     

                                                    Hunt

                                                    • 23. Re: Best media for long term archival purposes?
                                                      LaciG Level 1

                                                      Anyone who can help,

                                                       

                                                      I have an additional question about archiving. I have close to 1 TB raw material of my analog movies from the 90's and 90's that I captured as avi files on a 1 TB WD disk. (Of course, the DVD movies from this material are much smaller and will archive them on Tayo Yuden DVDs.) My question is: Is this external HDD a good long term storage solution for the original raw material, or are there other possibilities? (To save the raw material on the T-Y DVDs is out of the question, of course.)

                                                       

                                                      An unrelated question: Can I have both the PE7 and the (soon to be purchased) Premiere Professional CS5 on the same installation (and used each of them)?

                                                       

                                                      Thanks for all the good advice/help,

                                                       

                                                      Laci.

                                                       

                                                      P.S. I have just finished building my editing computer and now I am installing the software (and struggling with some issues). I will report on it on the Hardware Forum as soon as I have solved those issues (and if I can't, then I will ask for help - as usual.

                                                      • 24. Re: Best media for long term archival purposes?
                                                        rdnelson Level 2

                                                        I have used WD for years and had good luck with both internal and external drives.

                                                         

                                                        I would recommend you have a couple of external backups.  I may be anal but this is my setup...

                                                         

                                                        1) My server has (2) 2TB drives where my media and catalogs are stored.  I don't download/edit video every day and my thoughts are to keep the media on a different complete system than my desktop which I (and my kids) use every day.  I flip on the server when I need it.  Performance is not an issue for me with the proper Samba and windows configuration plus gigabit network.

                                                         

                                                        2) Make at least two complete external backups.  My thoughts on this is are a) one backup is always offsite in case of fire or flood, and b) there is always a second backup in case I mess up making a backup.  My worse case scenario is my server gets messed up and I make a backup of corrupted media.  Or, my server crashes when making a backup to the external devices which causes corruption.  I use SyncToy to sychronize the server with the external backups.  This is a great method of only copying over added or changed media over in addition to removing media that has been deleted from the server.

                                                         

                                                        3) Rotate between the backups and fire up the drives frequently such as once a month.  I have heard some hard drives will fail to start if they are left idle for more than a year.  I have some hard drives which have content that does not change because it is old material.  I still start the drive up and run a scan disk.

                                                         

                                                        4) Plan on refreshing your hard drives every few years.  For example, WD has a new external 3 TB (USB3) drive out.  I plan on retiring some of my older drives with this eventually.  Some of the drives I use for external backup are now hitting five years old -- although they haven't been used much they will fail, it is just a matter of time.  Also, the capacity is small at 250/500 GB and so it becomes a pain to back up because you have to spread out the backups between multiple drives.  And they are slow.

                                                        • 25. Re: Best media for long term archival purposes?
                                                          nealeh Level 5

                                                          An external USB drive ought to be good for ten years if you are not using it much. And in ten years time I would expect high speed storage devices of multi-terabytes (what comes after terabytes?) to be available that you could then transfer the files to.

                                                           

                                                          Cheers,
                                                          --
                                                          Neale
                                                          Insanity is hereditary, you get it from your children

                                                          • 26. Re: Best media for long term archival purposes?
                                                            Ed.Macke Level 3

                                                            Is this external HDD a good long term storage solution for the original raw material, or are there other possibilities?

                                                             

                                                            I'm not sure from your post whether you're saying that the external HDD is the only source of your raw material, or a backup of your raw material (aside from the original analog source, of course). If you only have 1 digital copy, then you might want to think about getting a 2nd drive (either internal or external).

                                                             

                                                            I think external HDDs are a fairly reliable medium, but I trust them less than internals (simply because they have more points of failure, such as the external interface software/hardware).

                                                             

                                                            For me, I keep one copy on my internal drive, and one copy on my external drive (which is an ioSafe SOLO 1.5TB... fireproof, waterproof, and can be cabled/bolted to your desk/floor to hinder theft). I use RoboCopy for syncing the internal/external. To me, this covers the most likely scenarios of accidental deletion, file corruption, fire, flood, theft.

                                                             

                                                            Offsite storage is even better, but I don't have the discipline to be swapping out drives . And online storage isn't really practical when you're talking terabytes, unless you have a T3 line. I do keep a copy of my completed DVDs (on TY media) in a safe deposit box.

                                                            • 27. Re: Best media for long term archival purposes?
                                                              LaciG Level 1

                                                              Hi rdnelson, nealeh and Ed,

                                                               

                                                              Thanks for all these advice. I am implementing/planning all.  (I just started backing up everything on a second external drive.) On the other hand, I just finished building my 'dream editing machine' so I have to have a little break (according to my wife) before I start spending again: upgrading to 3 TB, gigabit Ethernet, etc., but I will do it soon.

                                                               

                                                              Thanks again,

                                                               

                                                              Laci.

                                                              • 28. Re: Best media for long term archival purposes?
                                                                LaciG Level 1

                                                                Just a follow-up question. I have been using the Taiyo Yuden DVD+R 16x based on Bill's and others' advice on this forum. I bought the "white hub inkjet printable" (Part Number: DVD+R WPP600SK16) version so far. I noticed that they have "glossy silver" version, also. How copuld I find out how that looks without buying a 100 pack? (See, e.g. the two items on the web site http://www.supermediastore.com/product/search?search=dvd%2Bwpp600sk16&fromHeader=true&hidd enSearch= vs. the last item on the web site http://www.supermediastore.com/category/a/taiyo-yuden-blank-recordable-dvd-plus-r-disc-dis cs-media

                                                                 

                                                                Also, what does the JVC logo mean in front of the Taiyo Yuden trade mark?

                                                                 

                                                                Thank you as always,

                                                                 

                                                                Laci.

                                                                • 29. Re: Best media for long term archival purposes?
                                                                  Ed.Macke Level 3

                                                                  Laci,

                                                                   

                                                                  For lack of a better description, the "glossy silver" DVDs kind of look the same on both sides (i.e. the burnable and non-burnable sides of the DVD look pretty similar).

                                                                   

                                                                  The printable DVDs are designed to be printed on, whereas the glossy silver are not.

                                                                  • 31. Re: Best media for long term archival purposes?
                                                                    LaciG Level 1

                                                                    Ed, Just to make sure I understood you correctly: there is no inkjet printable glossy DVD, only the white non-glossy one is printable? Also, thanks for the JVC link (I got scared for a second, that this is not the same quality anymore ). Thanks again, Laci.

                                                                    • 32. Re: Best media for long term archival purposes?
                                                                      Ed.Macke Level 3
                                                                      function(){return A.apply(null,[this].concat($A(arguments)))}

                                                                      there is no inkjet printable glossy DVD, only the white non-glossy one is printable?

                                                                       

                                                                      Correct. I actually tried printing on a glossy DVD once, just to see what would happen. It was not pretty

                                                                      • 34. Re: Best media for long term archival purposes?
                                                                        _Paz_ Level 1

                                                                        Great information here.

                                                                         

                                                                        Laci,

                                                                         

                                                                        I took a look at both your links and the last one does say it is silver and printable.  It goes on to say it has an expected archival life of 100 years.  The white doesn't say that.  The silver is more expensive...

                                                                         

                                                                        So, I went to Google>Images and typed in white printable and silver printable dvds and came across the link below which shows pictures of both types, including printing.

                                                                         

                                                                        http://forums.afterdawn.com/thread_view.cfm/663757

                                                                         

                                                                        Paz

                                                                         

                                                                        PS I'll be looking for a printer that can print DVDs. (I happen to have a LightScribe DVD writer, but I'm not crazy about the look, either.  )

                                                                        For real printing, I've always thought one printed the label, then stuck it on the DVD.  Now I find myself wondering how the DVD goes around the rollers! <grin>

                                                                        • 35. Re: Best media for long term archival purposes?
                                                                          LaciG Level 1

                                                                          Paz,

                                                                           

                                                                          Thanks for the info. I talked with the SuperMediaStore.com customer support, and they told me that if I order the silver coated DVD and I don't like it, then I can return it for refund (minus restocking fee). I am going to do just this. I will report on the silver DVD quality and look.

                                                                           

                                                                          BTW, I have an Epson Artisan 50 printer (bought 2 weeks ago ) dedicated for CD printing, and right now I am experimenting with it. Its software is not that sophisticated, so I also use PhotoShop when creating the labels. I like this Epson, it works very well! (I have an HP All-in-One, that's why I use the Epson only for CD printing. There are somewhat more expensive Epson models that can do duplex, fax, etc.)

                                                                           

                                                                          I have another question: I was looking for Blu-ray disks but didn't find Taiyo Yuden BD. Do you have any idea if they will have it in the near future, or if they won't, then what BD brand would you suggest?

                                                                           

                                                                          P.S. I am not sure that I got the joke about the DVD and the rollers but this might be for the fact that English is my second language ...

                                                                           

                                                                          Thanks for the reference again,

                                                                           

                                                                          Laci.

                                                                          • 36. Re: Best media for long term archival purposes?
                                                                            nealeh Level 5

                                                                            I have silvered printable *** CDs *** (they have a slightly rough surface) and they print on very well so I should think you will be fine with silvered DVDs described as printable.

                                                                             

                                                                            The best printer I've ever had (and still have) for photos and CDs is the Canon Pixma iP6700D which comes with a tray for CDs/DVDs and prints directly onto them. It works really well and, while now out of production, the technology probably exists in their current range. Note though that the function wasn't activated in the Americas for the direct printing - goodness knows why - so check specifically that it is there if you do go down the Canon route.

                                                                             

                                                                            Cheers,
                                                                            --
                                                                            Neale
                                                                            Insanity is hereditary, you get it from your children

                                                                            • 37. Re: Best media for long term archival purposes?
                                                                              LaciG Level 1

                                                                              I will try the silver coated printable CD. Thanks, Laci.

                                                                              • 38. Re: Best media for long term archival purposes?
                                                                                Ed.Macke Level 3

                                                                                Ah! You learn something new every day!

                                                                                 

                                                                                The last time I ordered TY DVDs, they didn't have the silver inkjet printable, only white. Apparently that is something new. Looking again at your links, it *does* say "silver inkjet printable".... very cool.

                                                                                 

                                                                                Now that I'm actually paying attention , I noticed a couple of things: using your link, the "last item" on the page is 8X DVD+R and it does not say "hub printable" (meaning you can print all the way up to the hole).

                                                                                 

                                                                                Not sure what you were looking for, but I know TY has a wider selection of DVD-R than DVD+R.

                                                                                 

                                                                                For example, here's a silver 16X DVD-R hub printable, and it's $38 instead of $46.

                                                                                 

                                                                                http://www.supermediastore.com/product/u/taiyo-yuden-16x-dvd-r-media-silver-inkjet-hub-pri ntable-100-pack?max=30&sortBy=-&search=taiyo+yuden&offset=0&hiddenSearch=+%23Category%3A%2 7DVD-R+Media%27

                                                                                 

                                                                                I've always found it hard finding exactly what I'm looking for with TY, and now it looks even harder since they've added "water shield", "print plus semi-glossy", "hardcoat", but it doesn't look like you can get all of that in one product.

                                                                                 

                                                                                I can't seem to find a "Taiyo Yuden 16X White Inkjet Hub Printable PrintPlus Semi-Glossy Water Shield Hardcoat DVD-R"

                                                                                 

                                                                                Anyway, good discussion. Let us know how the silver inkjet printable DVDs turn out.


                                                                                BTW, I'm using an Epson Artisan 725 and it's fantastic at DVD (and photo) printing. I was going to get the Artisan 50, too, but found a great sale on the 725.

                                                                                • 39. Re: Best media for long term archival purposes?
                                                                                  _Paz_ Level 1

                                                                                  Laci,

                                                                                   

                                                                                  My lame joke was in reference to a piece of paper having to bend around a roller to print in the inkjet printers I have had.  Much like around the roller, or platen of a typewriter.  I'm guessing a DVD capable printer would have a drawer to hold the disc...

                                                                                   

                                                                                  to All,

                                                                                   

                                                                                  As for BluRay discs, I don't know, but did come across this link:

                                                                                   

                                                                                  http://blog.consumerpla.net/2011/02/best-blu-ray-media-brands-review.html

                                                                                   

                                                                                  which compares various brands.  They state the Taiyo Yuden is too new for there to be enough information.  On another site I saw where someone did recommend Taiyo Yuden for BluRay, but only if your player and burner is LTH (Low to High) compatible.  Apparently that applies for other brands as well.  From my perspective, I might or might not have an LTH compatible system now, but in future I might have something else, so I don't plan on going down that route. The review above does not reference LTH with Taiyo Yuden, so perhaps the company makes more than one kind.

                                                                                   

                                                                                  I noticed the review does not recommend Maxell.  FWIW (for what its worth), only yesterday I opened a Maxell CD-R I made in 2002 to find some backup information and thankfully, it worked fine.

                                                                                   

                                                                                  In the past, referring to CDs and DVDs, I have read that disc quality can vary widely from batch to batch in the same brand.  Also, the best discs will be blue or bluish-green colored on the side that is written.  If memory serves, the bluish discs have a chemical component that increase longevity.  I've always looked for those and this particular Maxell CD-R does have the  bluish write side color.  I have no idea if that will apply to BluRay discs or not.

                                                                                   

                                                                                  Neale and Ed,

                                                                                   

                                                                                  Thanks for listing your DVD label printing printers.   I guess I'll be in the market for one... like I need to spend more $$$!   :-O

                                                                                   

                                                                                  I LOVE Epson's color quality but have let 3 of them die by not using them often enough to keep the heads unclogged.  I currently have a cheapie Canon, the Pixma 495.  The prints are so-so.  The best thing about it is it is wireless.

                                                                                   

                                                                                  I'll be looking forward to seeing how your silver, printed disc looks, Laci.

                                                                                   

                                                                                  Paz

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