31 Replies Latest reply on Jul 13, 2010 2:57 PM by Druyan

    Human I/O: your fave keyboard and mouse for editing?

    Colin Brougham Level 6

      It suddenly dawned on me that, with my smokin' new system on the way, I have no means of interfacing with it. I mean, I'm sure it'll be totally simpatico and meld with my theta waves, but what if I actually want to type something?

       

      Are there actually any decent keyboards and meeses out there that are good for video editing? To clarify, I'm not looking for one of the candy-colored keyboards with custom NLE buttons--those are pretty useless, because I remap most of my keys for one thing, and for another, I think they're generally overpriced clicky-clacky garbage.

       

      Unfortunately, most of the keyboards I actually like (Microsoft curvy ones, for example--always liked them from the very first model, which I still own) seem well-designed for typing, but not so much for video editing, where your fingers are leaving the keys often. And a lot of the mice have all of these ridiculous Internet browsing-centric buttons that just make them bulky and quick to fill with hand gunk.

       

      Maybe I'm overthinking it, but with the many hours I spend banging away on a keyboard and the sharp twinges of shoulder, arm and wrist pain that I can only assume are the early signs of carpal tunnel syndrome, I'd like to find a decent setup that makes those hours at least moderately more enjoyable.

       

      Thanks for your suggestions!

        • 1. Re: Human I/O: your fave keyboard and mouse for editing?
          Studio North Films Level 3

          Have alook at these,

           

          they also do keyboard & mouse combo.

           

          http://www.logitech.com/en-gb/keyboards/keyboards/

           

           

           

          Baz

          1 person found this helpful
          • 2. Re: Human I/O: your fave keyboard and mouse for editing?
            Tayedrummer Level 1

            I've been primarily a Photoshop user but with CS5 I'm editing more video.  For Photoshop I've always used a Wacom Intuos tablet and I find it works well for Premiere as well.  Dragging/dropping/trimming/adjusting  all seem more natural and precise with a tablet than with a mouse.

            1 person found this helpful
            • 3. Re: Human I/O: your fave keyboard and mouse for editing?
              Colin Brougham Level 6

              Baz,

               

              Thanks for the suggestion. Is there a particular model of mouse/keyboard you like? In the past, I've liked Logitech mice but loathed their keyboards--I realize that such devices are largely preferential based on one's own likes and dislikes, but I do appreciate hearing what's been "field tested."

               

              Tayedrummer,

               

              I've tried tablets in the past (many years ago) and just couldn't get the hang of it, at least in an editor. I realize that they've improved dramatically over the last few generations. What size/model do you think is good for editing? For reference, I work with a 24" monitor, though I'm hoping to go up to two 24" monitors soon.

               

              I found this keyboard: http://www.geekstuff4u.com/video-editing-keyboard.html. Actually seems pretty well designed, but the price...!

              • 4. Re: Human I/O: your fave keyboard and mouse for editing?
                Druyan Level 1

                Hi Colin,

                 

                Instead of a mouse, have you considered a trackball?  Everyone I know who has used one long enough to get used to it never goes back to a mouse--myself included.

                 

                For some insane reason, they seem not to be so popular, and there are not as many of them out there... the ones I like best are not made anymore--but Kensington and Logitech still make some nice ones.

                 

                I like them because you don't have to move your whole arm around--it takes very littile movement of either your fingers or thumb to navigate, and drag through your timelines.  Some have a very convenient scroll wheel that can be customized to scroll through your timelines or and/or scrub video.

                 

                In addition to the trackball, I use the Wacom Tablet-- I'm a lefty, so the tablet sits on my left, the trackball on the right.  I use the trackball to navigate very quickly through my documents and images, and then seemlessly switch to the tablet for detailed editing.

                 

                It might be worth it to pick up a trackball at a local store, that way if you don't like it, simply return it-- but my bet is, you will want to keep it!

                 

                Here are two that I like (very expensive, though compared to mice.)

                 

                http://us.kensington.com/html/2200.html

                 

                http://us.kensington.com/html/17756.html

                 

                I have not tried this one, but it is much cheaper:

                 

                http://us.kensington.com/html/17762.html

                 

                Druyan

                • 5. Re: Human I/O: your fave keyboard and mouse for editing?
                  Colin Brougham Level 6

                  Druyan,

                   

                  Thanks for the great suggestion. It hadn't occurred to me to consider a trackball; I used one long, long ago, but hadn't thought of using them in a more contemporary means, such as video editing. I do like the idea of less arm protracting. Do you find that you can be accurate when navigating with it? That would have to be my greatest concern.

                  • 6. Re: Human I/O: your fave keyboard and mouse for editing?
                    Druyan Level 1

                    Hi Colin,

                     

                    I actually find that using the trackball is SO much easier than a mouse to achieve a high degree of accuracy, because it is much easier to make miniscule adjustments of the cursor using my fingers rather than moving my whole arm.  This is especially true after long editing sessions, or working late into the night.  It is much more comfortable and less tiring to rest your hand on the trackball and move the cursor by the subtle movements of your fingers.  I have my cursor speed adjusted to "fast" so that I never need to move my fingers more than one inch to move from one end of the screen to the other.  I am able to control the cursor so precisely that I often use it rather than switch to the Wacom for certain edits in Photoshop.

                     

                    Furthermore, it is great for any movements where you need to 'click and drag', like moving through a timeline, or cutting and pasting.  With the default settings of most trackballs, you click and hold wtih your thumb while using your fingers to move the ball to drag-- MUCH easier than with a mouse.

                     

                    When I first got my new Wacom, I tried to use the mouse just because it was there... but a trackball just seems much more ergonomically efficient and somehow more intuitive now-- I find that using a mouse now is like trying to use a keyboard with mittens on.

                     

                    It takes a few days to get used to, but I don't think you will be disappointed... in fact, I consider it one of my most important peripherals, which is why I didn't mind spending the extra money for the more expensive one.

                     

                    Druyan

                    • 7. Re: Human I/O: your fave keyboard and mouse for editing?
                      Colin Brougham Level 6

                      This is especially true after long editing sessions, or working late into the night.

                      I have absolutely NO idea what you're talking about!

                       

                      Seriously though, I think you sold me. I'm checking prices now... gulp.

                       

                      Cheers, and thanks again for the excellent suggestion.

                       

                      colin

                      • 8. Re: Human I/O: your fave keyboard and mouse for editing?
                        Druyan Level 1

                        Ha Ha!!  You have found some secret to editing... you turn off the machines spot on at 5!  Good for you!

                         

                        Yes, the prices can make you gulp on some of them, but you know, some of my favorites are still the $30 ones.  The only reason I have some of the more expensive models is because my wife's company bought them for her because she gets carpal tunnel syndrome using a mouse!  (She hasn't figured out where they disappeared to yet...shhhh!)  The Kensington Orbit with scroll ring looks like it would do the job just fine.

                         

                        One thing I do like is the feel of a heavier ball... but it is not necessary, just a preference. There have been a couple that I have tried and returned, but I don't remember which those were.

                         

                        Between the two most expensive Kensingtons-- the Slimblade and the Expert Mouse, I prefer the Expert because the scroll ring has a much more tactile feel and is easier to adjust for fine movements.  The Expert comes with four programmable buttons--but I only use two anyway, so if I were to buy one today, I would try the Orbit with scroll ring.

                         

                        Good luck!

                        Druyan

                        • 9. Re: Human I/O: your fave keyboard and mouse for editing?
                          Tayedrummer Level 1

                          Hey Colin, the Intuos4 Medium would be the most common size and it's relatively affordable.  Like you I tried a tablet many years ago and found it awkward.  I started using one again for Photoshop and now I can't work without it.  I don't make my living editing but I have been using the tablet with Premiere and all the tweaking of clips/effects seems much more...uh...organic(?) when compared to mouse-ing it.  A tablet allows you to go right from one point on the screen to another without having to drag across it.

                           

                          If you use Photoshop and adjustment layers and masks a lot a tablet will totally change the way you work...strictly for video it will be an adjustment.

                          • 10. Re: Human I/O: your fave keyboard and mouse for editing?
                            Video@SouthpointCCC Level 1

                            I was thinking about chiming in when this post first opened and now, after seeing the theme of the responses, I have to!

                             

                            I absolutely agree that there are much better input devices out there for editing and graphics than a standard mouse.  Here are my thoughts on some of them:

                             

                            Trackball:  Tremendously under rated for both editing and graphics.  Least fatiguing input method I have used and quick. Just think how long it takes you to pick up your arm and move it back to the other edge of your mouse surface to continue a long scroll and compare that to moving your fingers across their maximum movement range.  Good ones were much more accurate than wheel mice, about the same as a quality as a good modern mouse.  Heavy balls are nice because they make it easier to make smaller adjustments.

                             

                            Pen/Tablet: I have friends/colleagues who swear by them. I haven't committed the time it takes to get accustomed using these so my results have been mixed. I still find them faster to navigate with and for general work in Photoshop but I have to switch to a mouse for detailed stuff.  I'd image (though I haven't used them this way) that they would be very well suited for editing as you don't have to be quite as precise.

                             

                            Touch Pad:  This hasn't been mentioned yet but I absolutely love using the multi-touch pad on my MBP for Photoshop and editing.  No, I don't enjoy having to edit/tweak/create on a laptop's tiny screen, but now when I do have to (I do some live venue work so things sometimes change at the last minute) it is much better than when I was saddled with a mouse.  Most of the ergonomic benefits of the trackball with some additional unique features (one, two, three and four finger gestures and swipes to execute different commands, etc.)  Again, something that takes getting used to - my boss cannot use the track pad at all and get's so frustrated that he walks away (another positive feature).  After using it for most of the day, however, I will find that my fingers are a bit sore and the skin on my index and middle fingers are a bit raw (we're talking 8-10 hours with little break).

                             

                            I would definitely consider a trackball.  After a week or so you will wonder why you didn't get one sooner.

                             

                            Cheers,

                             

                            Jim G

                            • 11. Re: Human I/O: your fave keyboard and mouse for editing?
                              Colin Brougham Level 6

                              Thanks for chiming in, Jim--next time, don't be so bashful

                               

                              I'm definitely getting a trackball, after all of these favorable reviews. I'm in a fleaBay auction right now for an Expert Mouse (newest version), but if I don't win that, I found it new at Dell for $65 shipped, which I think is a decent price. The SlimBlade does not seem to be garnering too many favorable reviews, so I'll take Druyan's recommendation on the Expert Mouse; plus, this saves a few pennies for other things like a decent keyboard.

                               

                              I'll look into a Wacom tablet, too, but that'll probably have to wait for a few. I do use Photoshop, of course, but I'm not sure to the extent where a tablet and stylus will really benefit much--I'm not much of a graphic artist. Just enough to be dangerous...

                               

                              There is some company whose name escapes me at the moment that has multitouch user interfaces for media applications. Basically, it's a big touch pad where you can interact with your timeline or other media application and really "get a handle on things." I think that's interesting technology, but I'm going to set that one out for a few innings; it'll be hard for me to move into that idiom (we all know it's coming, whether we like it or not), because I'm a big fan of tactile feedback. Honestly, the best keyboard I've ever used is the old-skool IBM PS/2 model: it clicked and clacked with every key depression, but you could chop through redwood with it, if you had to. They don't make 'em like they used to... though that's usually a good thing

                               

                              Thanks again for all the great suggestions. I'm still fielding responses on keyboards; as completely non-sexy as they are, they're still essential. For reference, I'm considering the Microsoft Natural Ergonomic 4000, because I've always like Microsoft keyboards for some reason. What do you like?

                              • 12. Re: Human I/O: your fave keyboard and mouse for editing?
                                Colin Brougham Level 6
                                Ha Ha!!  You have found some secret to editing... you turn off the machines spot on at 5!  Good for you!

                                Surely, you jest! I guess I should have added the requisite <sarcasm></sarcasm> tags

                                Between the two most expensive Kensingtons-- the Slimblade and the Expert Mouse, I prefer the Expert because the scroll ring has a much more tactile feel and is easier to adjust for fine movements.  The Expert comes with four programmable buttons--but I only use two anyway, so if I were to buy one today, I would try the Orbit with scroll ring.

                                Thanks for that input (pun slightly intended). I'm in an auction for a new Expert Mouse, and if that doesn't go my way, I found the EM for $65 shipped at Dell. I can deal with that. The SlimBlade doesn't seem to have the best reviews, so I'll give up some style for functionality, without a doubt.

                                • 13. Re: Human I/O: your fave keyboard and mouse for editing?
                                  Tayedrummer Level 1

                                  As the lone guy in this thread waving the tablet flag I'd just add that in my experience a tablet is about a million, zillion times more precise than a mouse (can't comment on trackball).  For me a tablet is all about the 'feel', it feels right and I can accurately get the results I want.  If I go back to a mouse it feels like using a bar of soap.  I have no ability to draw, that's why I went into the camera department after all, but if you use adjustment layers you must be using masks and it is soooooo much easier to paint in the adjustments using non-destructive adjustment layers with a tablet than with any other gizmo.

                                   

                                  ...now if only Euphonix colour correction panel (http://www.euphonix.com/artist/products/mc_color/)  would support Premiere...

                                  • 14. Re: Human I/O: your fave keyboard and mouse for editing?
                                    Druyan Level 1

                                    Yes, Colin, jesting I surely was... I know that the terms 'video editing' and 'getting off work early' do not go in the same sentence without a heavy dose of sarcasm! ... ...  It must be I who should have added the sarcasm tags!

                                     

                                    I agree with you about the Slimblade... the Expert will do you much better.  I prefer to use it with the included wrist rest that it comes with--I hope you will be happy with it.

                                     

                                    Just to chime in about the tablet as well:  I use the Intuos4 medium, and, as had been mentioned above, I it absolutely essential for Photoshop-- I would not use anything else for editing images.  But for video editing and navigating across the screen (including Lightroom and Bridge), the trackball is much faster.

                                     

                                    I use both simultaneously.  I have two monitors, the tablet controls the cursor on the 'image' monitor, and the trackball on the monitor that has my timeline / panels / tools / etc., depending upon which program I'm in.  I don't know if it helps that I am ambidextrous or not... but it is very fluid for me to use both-- the tablet on my left, and the trackball on my right.  I hardly ever touch the keyboard in this mode of working except for a series of shortcuts that I may use at times.

                                     

                                    Thanks for all those that did chime in... I hope it inspires others to try trackballs-- if they become more popular, manufacturers will hopefully listen and create more of them!

                                     

                                    My favorite is still the old Microsoft Trackball Explorer, which was discontined a long time ago and now sells new for $478!!!!

                                     

                                    http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00005853Z?ie=UTF8&seller=A16ONSJZCR5GIF&sn=Isaacstore

                                     

                                    Let me know how you like it, Colin!

                                     

                                    Druyan

                                    • 15. Re: Human I/O: your fave keyboard and mouse for editing?
                                      Colin Brougham Level 6

                                      Druyan,

                                       

                                      Last night, I ordered a Kensington Expert Mouse through Dell Small Business (along with a Microsoft Natural Ergonomic 4000 keyboard), and they should be here on Wednesday. You know you're a geekus maximus when you're as (maybe more) stoked about the delivery of a freaking mouse than you are your new computer guts! OK, so I might be exaggerating a bit, but I'm pretty pumped, nonetheless I just hope that I do like it, otherwise I'm going to send some serious finger-cramping vibes your way

                                       

                                      I'm not sure that the model I got comes with the wrist support; it actually appears like there are two different models/packages. Maybe I'll be surprised...

                                       

                                      I don't know if it helps that I am ambidextrous or not... but it is very fluid for me to use both-- the tablet on my left, and the trackball on my right.  I hardly ever touch the keyboard in this mode of working except for a series of shortcuts that I may use at times.

                                       

                                      Yeah, I'd say so! I have enough trouble with my pre-programmed hand. And I'm most definitely a keyboard editor--maybe more so than with a mouse--which probably comes from cutting my NLE teeth with Avid. Avid (at least at that point in time) didn't offer a great deal of mouse interaction with the timeline, so knowing keyboard shortcuts was a huge timesaver. In fact, I've gone to the point where I've remapped several Premiere keystrokes to match those of Avid NLEs--muscle memory is a crazy thing.

                                      I hope it inspires others to try trackballs-- if they become more popular, manufacturers will hopefully listen and create more of them!

                                      Funny you should say that. I'm working on a project separate from my own business where I'm working on implementing a number of workstations for large-scale tape capture, preservation, and archiving. I was talking with a younger guy who will be working with me on the project, and telling him that I was going to try out a trackball for my business workstation. He immediately said, "I think we should get them for our project! We're going to be spending waaaay too much time at these computers!" Even though he'd never used one, he was ready to get on board

                                      My favorite is still the old Microsoft Trackball Explorer, which was discontined a long time ago and now sells new for $478!!!!

                                      Yikes. And I thought computer technology was supposed to depreciate in value!

                                       

                                      Thanks again for your guidance; I'll let you know how it goes.

                                      • 16. Re: Human I/O: your fave keyboard and mouse for editing?
                                        Druyan Level 1

                                        Yes, let me know-- you'll either love me or hate me!  Have you posted anywhere here the system that you are building?  I'm also in the process of ordering all the guts for my new system-- here's what I have so far:

                                         

                                        Coolermaster HAF X case

                                        i7 980x

                                        GTX 480

                                        Asus Rampage III Extreme motherboard

                                         

                                        Still have to decide on monitor and hard drives...

                                        • 17. Re: Human I/O: your fave keyboard and mouse for editing?
                                          Colin Brougham Level 6

                                          Druyan,

                                           

                                          Yep, you can see the various phases of trial and error I went through here: Re: Picking a motherboard for a new build: getting serious now. My final menu ended up being just slightly different:

                                           

                                          • ASUS P6X58D (open box - saved about $80)
                                          • i7-930
                                          • OCZ Gold 12GB (6 x 2GB) DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800)
                                          • GIGABYTE GeForce GTX 480
                                          • COOLER MASTER HAF 932
                                          • COOLER MASTER Silent Pro 1000W
                                          • Western Digital VelociRaptor 150GB (system drive)
                                          • HITACHI 500GB 7200 RPM SATA 3.0Gb/s (projects or export, maybe paging file - got it for free with GPU, so what the heck?)
                                          • 4x SAMSUNG Spinpoint F3 1TB 7200 RPM SATA 3.0Gb/s (media with onboard RAID for now, will get RAID controller later, if I need it)
                                          • Noctua NH-D14 CPU Cooler
                                          • Other stuff like a DVD burner, thermal paste, and Windows 7 Pro x64

                                           

                                          I got everything from Newegg, and through open box deals, combo discounts, coupon codes and capitalist savvy, I'm only out $2375 with shipping. Matter o' fact, as I write this, Mr. Brown is on the way to my house with goodies galore--this afternoon will be spent feverishly tearing open packages and sticking all of these parts together.

                                           

                                          You might want to check on the ASUS Rampage + i7-980x combo; Baz (Studio North) just posted a link to a review that I guess suggests that maybe that's not the best combo.

                                           

                                          I must admit that I did little to no external research on the hardware I picked--it was all chosen through reading and recommendations here on the Adobe forums. I figured that the best ideas would come from folks who are actually using such hardware for the same purposes that I am. And, since we're graced with the presence of L337 Commander Harm Millaard of 4d0B3 Tech Corps and Panzer Brigade, I tend to defer to people like him that, uh, know their scat

                                           

                                          Anyway, my choices were motivated by the fact that, while I realized I could have spent a much bigger bundle on the most cutting edge gear, I could get far more bang for my limited bucks by building a rig like that above. There's modularity and flexibility built in, so I can upgrade when far faster and cheaper CPUs than the i7-980x come on the scene, and really--I'm coming from a 3+ year-old machine, so this is still going to feel like I'm getting my face peeled off on shuttle re-entry. Besides that, the type of media and projects I'm working with regularly doesn't dictate a top-of-the-pops system--this rig will tear through my projects like a firehose through tissue paper. I still splurged on a few things--like the GTX 480--which isn't "supported" right now (though, I'm hoping/confident it will be), but I figured it made more sense to spend the money once, or twice.

                                           

                                          Long story short is that I'm far from the guy to talk to about rig recommendations; there are many others here who can offer up far more valid suggestions than I ever could. The bottom line is that any modern system is really going to help CS5 perform its best, and that means more fun and less frustration when the trackball hits the timeline

                                           

                                          Good luck with whatever you choose to build!

                                          • 18. Re: Human I/O: your fave keyboard and mouse for editing?
                                            Harm Millaard Level 7

                                            Colin,

                                             

                                            Congrats on a very very nice system and good to hear it is reasonably affordable as well. Good luck with your build.

                                            • 19. Re: Human I/O: your fave keyboard and mouse for editing?
                                              Colin Brougham Level 6

                                              Thanks Harm. As I've mentioned previously, thanks so much for your wisdom and guidance throughout the pick-and-choose process. I'm looking forward to mowing down some pixels with this new rig

                                              • 20. Re: Human I/O: your fave keyboard and mouse for editing?
                                                Colin Brougham Level 6

                                                Druyan,

                                                 

                                                My Expert Mouse arrived this morning, and like a rabid dog, I tore into it and installed it on the new system (actually, both of my systems via a KVM). All I gotta say is...

                                                 

                                                Awww, yeah.

                                                 

                                                This is what I was missing. It felt immediately "like home." I'll have to take a little bit of time getting used to its nuances, but the bottom line is that this is going to make the countless hours of glazed-over editing sessions at least a little bit more tolerable.

                                                 

                                                Cheers for the great recommendation!

                                                 

                                                PS: the MS Natural Ergo 4000 is pretty sweet too.

                                                • 22. Re: Human I/O: your fave keyboard and mouse for editing?
                                                  Harm Millaard Level 7

                                                  Druyan,

                                                   

                                                  Can you give me some hands on experience on trackballs in general and the Expert mouse in particular?

                                                   

                                                  I have once used a cheapo trackball and was not enthousiastic about it. My major problem was covering the distance from left to right on a dual monitor 1920 x 1080 setup, but also the muscle control to stop movement at the correct position and finding the balance between accuracy and speed.

                                                   

                                                  When you say accuracy is great, I surely believe you, but then my problem, moving from far left to right is even aggravated requiring even more movements. Is there any way to switch from accuracy to speed and back? Does it make any difference for a lefty versus a right handed user?

                                                   

                                                  TIA

                                                  • 23. Re: Human I/O: your fave keyboard and mouse for editing?
                                                    Druyan Level 1

                                                    Hi Harm,

                                                     

                                                    There are 2 advantages to the more expensive trackballs that help with the issues you are talking about:  (The specifics below apply to the Kensington Expert)

                                                     

                                                    First, they tend to have a larger, heavier ball, which helps very much with the accuracy because when it comes time to stop your cursor exactly where you want it to stop, the inertia of the heavier ball helps stop on a dime when moving short distances, and at the same time the added momentum can help you cover larger areas or two screens.  After some practice, I have learned how to 'flick' my pointer to the second monitor, and then easily re-position it with more precise movements.

                                                     

                                                    Second, there are two options in the software settings that help to move across screen real estate... pointer "speed", and pointer "acceleration".  I recommend setting the "speed" to the fastest possible setting you can control.  This can actually be set in Control Panel>Mouse Properties>Pointer Options.  I also check the "enhance pointer precision" box.  This is using the Windows control, not the Kensington software.

                                                     

                                                    With the "speed" setting at the fastest point (which is where I keep mine), I can move my cursor easily across one screen (same resolution as yours) by moving my finger in only a one-inch arc over the top of the trackball.  The greatest arc you can make on the Expert is 3 inches, so my fingers almost always occupies only the top of the ball while using one screen.  (This is the advantage of the larger balls--they can move farther on the screen with less movement of your fingers).

                                                     

                                                    If I want to move it to the second screen, I simply start the movement further down on the ball, and can easily travel from the left side of my left screen to the right side of my right screen within that 3-inch arc, in one swift movement.

                                                     

                                                    The other setting for "acceleration" involves using the Kensington software, and this addresses your question about switching from accuracy to speed and back automatically.  This setting changes the speed of the pointer according to the acceleration of the ball-- if you accelerate quickly, the pointer will move quicker and farther (the speed and distance are adjustable).  If you accelerate slowly, you will get more accuracy.  So, accelerate quickly for distance/speed, and accelerate slowly for accuracy.

                                                     

                                                    I used the acceleration setting when I used a smaller trackball-- but since I have been using the Expert, I have found no need for it, because I can cover both monitors easily.  Also, I like to have less software on my computer, so I un-installed the Kensington software and simply control the settings in the Control Panel (you can also control the speed of the scroll ring here).  But, it's good to know the option is there, as it's just a matter of personal preference.  I think with some experimenting, you will be able to find a setting that you like, but I would try it without the Kensington software first--I'm sure you like to keep your system as clean as possible as well.

                                                     

                                                    It makes no difference using it left or right handed, as the ball is perfectly centered in its cradle.  I use the trackball with my right hand, which I assume most people will.  I use my Wacom with my left hand, because that is my more precise hand.

                                                     

                                                    The only other tip to keep up the accuracy and the fluid movement, is to dust out the cradle very frequently--they collect dust like a magnet (take note of that, Colin!).

                                                     

                                                    Also, one of the best things I like about the Expert is that the scroll ring is always so accessible and easy to use--scrolling and moving the pointer/cursor are done very seamlessly.  The click-and-drag is a dream to use with the left-click button so accessible.

                                                     

                                                    Hope this helps!

                                                    Druyan

                                                    • 24. Re: Human I/O: your fave keyboard and mouse for editing?
                                                      Harm Millaard Level 7

                                                      Thanks Druyan for this extensive and helpful answer. I think I will have a look at it. Found a shop nearby that has it in stock. Hope they let me try it out.

                                                      • 25. Re: Human I/O: your fave keyboard and mouse for editing?
                                                        Colin Brougham Level 6

                                                        I'll second everything Druyan said. In my only couple hours of experience with it, this is the most natural and comfortable computer interface I've ever had the pleasure to use.

                                                         

                                                        Props again for the recommendation!

                                                        • 26. Re: Human I/O: your fave keyboard and mouse for editing?
                                                          Druyan Level 1

                                                          Hey, Colin--Did your model come with the wrist rest?

                                                          • 27. Re: Human I/O: your fave keyboard and mouse for editing?
                                                            Colin Brougham Level 6

                                                            Yes, as a matter of fact, it did--and I'm using it. I installed it from the get-go, so I haven't even tried it without. I like it--can't imagine using it without, frankly. I think it helps ease the arm transition from the flat of the desk to the raised trackball. I've found that if I hold my hand and fingers like a "claw" I've got great control and no fatigue.

                                                             

                                                            And that scroll ring... awesome, defined. It's like a scroll wheel and a jog/shuttle all in one

                                                            • 28. Re: Human I/O: your fave keyboard and mouse for editing?
                                                              Druyan Level 1

                                                              Happy to return the favor, Harm... you give us all such great advice and thorough articles--I don't know what we'd do without you!

                                                              Druyan

                                                              • 29. Re: Human I/O: your fave keyboard and mouse for editing?
                                                                Colin Brougham Level 6

                                                                Just a quick update that after using the Kensington Expert Mouse trackball for a few weeks, I now consider it an indispensible addition to my editing system. In fact, I get ticked off when I go to my laptop where I'm using a wireless mouse--it just doesn't work the way I want any more!

                                                                 

                                                                I highly recommend to anyone who performs hours of editing a day (or even less, for that matter) to consider this piece of hardware. The scroll ring alone is worth the price of admission.

                                                                 

                                                                Speaking of price, Amazon has the Expert Mouse with a $20 rebate right now... of course. I'm just saying...

                                                                 

                                                                Thanks again to Druyan for his initial recommendation!

                                                                • 30. Re: Human I/O: your fave keyboard and mouse for editing?
                                                                  Druyan Level 1

                                                                  Any time, Colin...

                                                                   

                                                                  For anyone who is still wavering, I strongly second Colin's enthusiasm... whenever I go back to a mouse (on someone else's computer, of course), I feel like a drunken bull in a china shop... there is that much of a difference!

                                                                   

                                                                  Happy editing!!

                                                                  • 31. Re: Human I/O: your fave keyboard and mouse for editing?
                                                                    Druyan Level 1

                                                                    By the way, Harm.. did you ever check out the trackball?