6 Replies Latest reply on Jul 29, 2010 5:05 AM by Bill Engeler

    PPro and TimeLapse

    adobejiro Level 1

      I was wondering if you can make TimeLapse sequenced movies in PPro?

      I don't mean just importing an h264 file and speeding it up.

       

      I mean, import RAW images taken with an intervalometer into the PPro timeline?
      I believe some people have mentioned that they do this in QuickTime Pro. Can this

      be done in PPro? Thanks.

        • 1. Re: PPro and TimeLapse
          adobejiro Level 1

          Bump...

           

          No clue guys? Just importing .RAW images into Ppro for TimeLapse?

          • 2. Re: PPro and TimeLapse
            Colin Brougham Level 6

            Premiere won't import the RAW files, I don't believe; however, creating a timelapse using sequential stills isn't a problem. Read the help file under Import numbered still-image sequences as video clips for more information on this. You'd have to process your RAW images into something else first, like TIFF.

             

            You can change the framerate of your still sequence by right-clicking it and seleting Modify > Interpret Footage. You can also set a default frame rate for all "indeterminate" media in Edit > Preferences > Media; by default, it's 29.97 but you can set it to you preferred timebase. Obviously, this can be overriden with the Interpret Footage command.

            • 3. Re: PPro and TimeLapse
              Jon-M-Spear Level 4

              RAW images and TIFs are overkill - even for HD projects.  They're just too big and, as Colin says, RAW is not directly supported.

               

              Not only do JPGs allow so much more to be captured in camera before a flash card change is required, but also the file size is much smaller - which Premiere Pro is happier with.  Also, resolution for video needn't be above 72 dpi.

               

              It's the only time I set my stills camera to capture JPG.  It works well.

               

              When importing stills into Premiere, don't forget to set the default duration of a still to the length you want - otherwise changing the duration of thousands of clips manually becomes one's life's work!

              .

              1 person found this helpful
              • 4. Re: PPro and TimeLapse
                Colin Brougham Level 6

                When importing stills into Premiere, don't forget to set the default duration of a still to the length you want - otherwise changing the duration of thousands of clips manually becomes one's life's work!

                 

                There's no need to do this. If you import the stills as a sequence, as long as the files are properly and sequentially numbered, each still has a duration of one "frame" based on your timebase. You can change the frame rate interpretation through the right-click > Modify > Interpret Footage method I described above, but that doesn't change the duration of each individual frame, only how many frames comprise a second. Any sequence of images imported this way becomes, in effect, one clip, instead of multiple clips.

                 

                Good point on the scaling, though.

                1 person found this helpful
                • 5. Re: PPro and TimeLapse
                  adobejiro Level 1

                  Thank you much guys! I'm pretty new to this but my favorite TimeLapse photographer uses RAW but he does it

                  in QuickTime Pro. I don't think its the latest version...the one before that. Anyway, i guess TIFF and RAW are

                  pretty close to the same quality?

                  • 6. Re: PPro and TimeLapse
                    Bill Engeler Level 2

                    Use Photoshop or a similar application to process the photos into JPEGs of 1920 x 1280 pixel size for HD, or slightly larger if you want to pan and scan in the frame (there will already be a little overlap at the top and bottom on the frame, because of the differening shape of the frames - HD video is not as tall).   Anything bigger than this is likely to give Premiere hiccups, and is a complete waste of space. Remember that a HD frame is only about 2 megapixels(1920x1080).  Straight from the camera, almost any still image is way too big for video.

                     

                    Don't worry about dpi; this measurement has no relevance for video, only for printing.  The only measurements that are important are the pixel dimensions.