2 Replies Latest reply on Aug 11, 2010 9:47 AM by Mylenium

    Best setting for 1080i HD

    jlstaples

      I've been looking around on the web for a while now looking for the best solution to output my project for HD.  I create commercials for a local TV station and we just started broadcasting HD commercials.  What is the best setting to use when rendering?  We transfer spots directly into a server for airing so it doesn't need to be compressed and put to other media first.  Any help is appreciated!

        • 1. Re: Best setting for 1080i HD
          Rick Gerard Adobe Community Professional & MVP

          You've got to ask their folks what they want. Generally I render my masters for archiving to a 10bit codec like Apple ProRez 444 or Black Magic. From that lossless or nearly lossless master I render what the client (the TV Station in your case) wants. I keep a spreadsheet with the requirements by client. There are literally hundreds of possible standards. Of my 40 or so regular clients I have about 30 different requirements for delivery. They include everything from compression codec to color management.

           

          Short answer... you've got to ask the client. You won't seem like an idiot unless you send them the wrong format.

          • 2. Re: Best setting for 1080i HD
            Mylenium Most Valuable Participant
            We transfer spots directly into a server for airing so it doesn't need to be compressed and put to other media first.

             

            But it is being compressed when sent, so ultimately there is little point in insisting doing it uncompressed in any way. Most HD broadcast's are MPEG-2 transport streams, some MPEG-4/ H.264, but which ones depends on the hardware the station uses. Anyway, most of these transcoders/ encoders will gladly swallow native MXF/ P2 files, MPEG-2 program streams or H.264 and be smart enough to merely conform/ transcode it without adding anotehr destructive compression pass. So, given you use sufficient dat rates, it should be safe to use any of those formats. Everything else is surely written somewhere in the encoder box' manual, so you may get better answers from the techs of the station.

             

            Mylenium