5 Replies Latest reply on Aug 17, 2010 8:46 AM by the_wine_snob

    Split Audio

    dizzy8888

      Hi!  HELP!!!  I recorded some video last week - using a camera mic on Ch2, and a lapel mic on Ch1. This was exported to quicktime files for me to import to Elements 8.0.

       

      I've already done a vast amount of editing - but stupidly didn't notice that the audio is all on Audio 1, already mixed!!!!  Meaning i've got lots of ambient noise I don't want, or at least want to knock back a bit.

       

      I'm a newbie to Elements - is there ANY way, I can split the channels on to separate audio tracks?  If not, in future is it possible to import the channels separately?

        • 1. Re: Split Audio
          nealeh Level 5

          No, you cannot split the audio if it has been imported from QuickTime files onto a single track. For the future yes you can add different audio tracks to your project assets and drag them to whichever audio tracks you want.

           

          Cheers,
          --
          Neale
          Insanity is hereditary, you get it from your children

          • 2. Re: Split Audio
            the_wine_snob Level 9

            Removing ambient noise is iffy, at best, but this ARTICLE might offer some tips.

             

            As Neale states, once mixed and Exported, your Audio cannot be later split (at least not without a great deal of work, and a lot of luck).

             

            Can you possibly go back to the original source material, and start this part over? All you need to do is rip/extract/Import the original Audio streams, and then address them separately.

             

            Good luck,

             

            Hunt

            • 3. Re: Split Audio
              dizzy8888 Level 1

              Hi. Thanks for those answers.

              So, I exported the camera mic as a separate .WAV file - and dragged it on to the narration channel.  It's about half a frame out from the mixed audio that is with the video.  Obviously I can only shunt the audio 1 frame in either direction, but not the half a frame or so I need to move it to marry it up. Any ideas?

              • 4. Re: Split Audio
                nealeh Level 5

                You will have to edit the sound outside of PRE because, as you say, one frame is the lowest unit of measure. Assuming you are on an NTSC project the unit of measure in PRE is 30fps. You want to shift it by half-a-frame so you need to adjust by 1/60th of a second. A PAL project will need 1/50th.

                 

                You could look at Wavosaur or Audacity. Both are well thought of. Personally I use the commercial product Maigix Audio Cleaning Lab.

                 

                Cheers,
                --
                Neale
                Insanity is hereditary, you get it from your children

                • 5. Re: Split Audio
                  the_wine_snob Level 9

                  Dizzy,

                   

                  I doubt that the audience can pick up a sync mis-match of 1/60th second. You might be able to, knowing the material, and with critical listening, but remember, a bit more than half of the audience's attention will be drawn to the visuals.

                   

                  For general OOS correction, this ARTICLE might offer some tips, but I think that you are beyond its scope.

                   

                  Now, PrPro has one neat capability - being able to set the TimeCode to Audio Units. This then allows one to slip the Audio Clip by 1/48,000th sec. (in the case of DVD Audio). That's a pretty fine increment. However, you would be surprised by the number of people, who want even finer increments! PrE only does the TimeCode increments in Frames, but 1/30th of a sec. is still pretty fine, when dealing with human sight and hearing.

                   

                  In your case, I agree with Neale. An audio-editing program WILL allow you to move the sound to an Audio Unit/Sample Size, so you would basically pad the beginning by that 1/60th sec, with 1/60th sec. (24KHz) of silence. [Note: my comments are based on NTSC, so just do the math, per Neale's formula if PAL.]

                   

                  Good luck,

                   

                  Hunt