11 Replies Latest reply on Sep 13, 2010 9:54 AM by digitalmusicman

    virtualdub

    digitalmusicman

      I've been downloading some video files. these files mostly are encoded with XVID. (highly compresses the files for download over the web) I've already been told that PE chokes on such files and found that out for myself. (can't really edit such files)

      I've got a question: (doesn't really pertain to PE)

      those highly compressed files sometimes exhibit something rather annoying: the audio and video are just a bit "out of sync". I,ve been reading other foruns and the consensus seems to be to use "virtualdub" to set the audio and video framerates the same. well,this is confusing. shouldn't those framerates already be the same? I ask this here because this is where I get straight answers.

       

      tnx,

        • 1. Re: virtualdub
          the_wine_snob Level 9

          When faced with Xvid/DivX files, I always convert to DV-AVI Type II w/ 48KHz 16-bit PCM/WAV in DigitalMedia Converter 2.7. Those files do not suffer any OOS. That workflow has always worked for me.

           

          I do not use any of the other conversion programs, so cannot comment on how well, or poorly, any might work.

           

          Good luck,

           

          Hunt

          • 2. Re: virtualdub
            Steve Grisetti Adobe Community Professional

            Divx and Xvid are delivery formats and almost never produce usable editing files.

             

            But Super video converter should be able to convert them to DV-AVIs, per the FAQs to the right of this forum.

            http://forums.adobe.com/thread/415317?tstart=0

            • 3. Re: virtualdub
              digitalmusicman Level 1

              yeah Bill,I downloaded "digital media converter" and it looks good only it wants to do the audio as 44.1 and not 48 as a dvd should be can you change that? (yes,I selected DV-AVI type II) could it be that the Dolby sound is messing it up? Dolby is not listed as one of the audio formats it deals with.

               

              tnx,

              • 4. Re: virtualdub
                the_wine_snob Level 9

                I have not upgraded DMC from my version 2.7, so do not know what the newer version is like. IIRC, there are two versions, a standard, and a "Pro" version. My 2.7 allows 48KHz 16-bit PCM/WAV, and that is what I always choose. Too many AV files are still using the Audio CD 44.1KHz Sample-Rate. PrE (and PrPro) will usually be able to handle 44.1KHz, but I like to take the load off my NLE program, especially if I am already doing a conversion. Sorry that I cannot comment on the newer versions. I have a coupon for an upgrade for my two licenses, but have not gotten around to doing that yet. Even when I do, I will likely keep old 2.7 around - just in case.

                 

                Hunt

                • 5. Re: virtualdub
                  digitalmusicman Level 1

                  well, actually, this isn't a very big deal since nobody around can tell the difference between audio sampled at 44.1 and 48.

                   

                  tnx,

                  • 6. Re: virtualdub
                    digitalmusicman Level 1

                    just a note for anyone interrested: in my original post I said something about having "Virtualdub" setting the audio and video framerates the same to cure "out of sync" problems. well forget that! I must have read something "bogus"! the actual fix for "out of sync" problems with a video is still to use Virtualdub, but it's used to adjust the video framerate,either slightly increased or decreased depending on whether the voice or video occurs first.

                    anyway, this is what worked for me. I think PE can adjust the framerate too,but,it "chokes" on my downloaded files.

                     

                    tnx,

                    • 7. Re: virtualdub
                      digitalmusicman Level 1

                      well,the saga of my downloaded video files goes on...

                      that fix for "out of sync" videos that I mentioned in the last post evidently only works SOMETIMES! I tried it on one video and it seemed to work at the beginning of the video but gradually the "out of sync" showed up. now, on my latest attempt with an entirely new video(untouched by human hands or otherwise.:-), the video played just fine in "media player" so I burned it to dvd. on my tv, the old "bugaboo" returned. yes,the video gradually went "out of sync". (fine at the beginning but gradually went "out of sync"). so, I said to myself "self, this problem needs more work". so,this morning,I loaded up "VIRTUALDUB" (don't really know why I picked that program but you've gotta start SOMEWHERE!) and loaded the video into it. immediately, VIRTUALDUB gave me an error message saying in effect that the audio is VBR and this is "non-standard" with AVI files and you might see problems like "out of sync"on some players. AHA!!! their proposed solution is to do "full processing " in "VIRTUALDUB". so, I checked "full processing" on the audio menu and hit "save as avi". well,it took somewhat over an hour to process,but it appeared ok. when I looked at the resulting file...YIKES!!! the original puny (for a video file) 700 MEG file had grown to,are you ready? 92 GIG! it DID play in "media player" so I tried burning it (not expecting much) but it DID burn ok.  DVDFLICK took about the usual amount of time (2.5 hours) and produced a playable dvd. (must've compressed the living poop out of that humongous file to get it onto a dvd)

                      my question is simply whether I proceeded correctly or is there some other way to get VIRTALDUB to produce a smaller file?

                       

                      tnx,

                      • 8. Re: virtualdub
                        the_wine_snob Level 9

                        I have found that most dynamic OOS stems from MPEG Audio.

                         

                        My workaround is to rip the MPEG Audio, with a program like Adobe Audition, and then Save as PCM/WAV 48KHz 16-bit, Import that WAV into PrE/PrPro, and replace the muxed MPEG Audio with it. That has solved all OOS issues that I have faced.

                         

                        For general OOS issues, this ARTICLE might be of help. Obviously, static OOS is easy, but dynamic OOS takes more work.

                         

                        Good luck,

                         

                        Hunt

                        • 9. Re: virtualdub
                          digitalmusicman Level 1

                          thanks for that article Bill. it's a much more detailed procedure than the one I used last Christmas to sync a sountrack with a video track made out of some old 8mm film footage that someone put on VHS. (no sound on the old films,we made a sound track with a microphone) my procedure was roughly your procedure except it was "hit or miss". (very time consuming)

                           

                          tnx,

                          • 10. Re: virtualdub
                            the_wine_snob Level 9

                            You are most welcome.

                             

                            Happy editing, and hope that OOS can be handled adequately,

                             

                            Hunt

                            • 11. Re: virtualdub
                              digitalmusicman Level 1

                              ok,the latest:

                               

                              the downloaded videos only gradually go out of sync after about 1.5 hours. all the videos that run over that (and most of them run around 2.5 hrs) I now process with "virtualdub" set for "full processing" (both audio and video) and "sync to audio". this creates a very large file to say the least. (the last video processed came in over 200GB!) but it DOES correct the a/v sync problem. funny, the sync problem can be seen only in PE and NOT in any player like "mediaplayer", which may tend to "fake out" somebody into thinking all is well until they actually watch the video on tv.

                               

                              just a note here for anybody doing video work: (don't know if this has been mentioned before)

                              make sure all your hard-disks are formatted NTFS and not FAT32 since the maximum file size that a FAT32 disk can accept is 4GB. I ran into a problem trying to store some dvd images onto a big external drive which happened to be FAT32.

                               

                              tnx,