7 Replies Latest reply on Jul 26, 2007 9:35 PM by Speedr

    300dpi?

    Speedr Level 1
      Can I create an image at 300dpi in Fireworks???
      If so, how do you do i t?
        • 1. Re: 300dpi?
          Level 7
          Speedr wrote:

          > Can I create an image at 300dpi in Fireworks???
          > If so, how do you do i t?

          In the New Document dialog box, set the resolution to 300 Pixels/inch.
          Note that Fireworks uses PPI rather than DPI because it was developed
          for screen images rather than printed ones.


          --
          Linda Rathgeber [PVII] *Adobe Community Expert-Fireworks*
          --------------------------------------------------------------
          http://www.projectseven.com
          Fireworks Newsgroup: news://forums.projectseven.com/fireworks/
          CSS Newsgroup: news://forums.projectseven.com/css/
          http://www.adobe.com/communities/experts/
          --------------------------------------------------------------
          • 2. Re: 300dpi?
            Level 7
            On Mon, 23 Jul 2007, Speedr wrote

            >Can I create an image at 300dpi in Fireworks??? If so, how do you do i
            >t?

            You do know that an image you create at 300dpi will be no different to
            one you create at 10dpi other than its print size?
            http://www.emdpi.com/imagedpi.html

            --
            Richard Mason
            http://www.emdpi.com
            • 3. Re: 300dpi?
              Level 7
              On Tue, 24 Jul 2007 02:41:32 +0400, Speedr <webforumsuser@macromedia.com>
              wrote:

              > Can I create an image at 300dpi in Fireworks???
              > If so, how do you do i t?

              Yes. As it was already pointed out, you may specify resolution when
              creating a new image. Besides, you may specify resolution when scaling
              existing one.

              There are just a couple of moments Linda and Richard mentioned that may be
              not so clear:

              1) DPI vs PPI confusion. It is caused by the fact that printed images get
              halftoned, which involve some screen LPI (lines per inch) or some "dots",
              especially for desktop printers - developers of the latters like to refer
              to some "dots per inch", but forget to mention that many of such a "dots"
              are required to reconstruct a single "pixel" of the image. Your FW image
              will have "pixels", not "dots" ("dots" will be produced by printer
              software). So you should refer to it as "PPI" rather that "DPI". But yes,
              you can create the image with 300 PPI. Although it seem to be rather high.
              I'd say that most of printing technologies require no more that 200 PPI
              (and many require even less), so 300 ppi sounds to be more than necessary
              for most of the jobs.

              2) Another point of confuson is on-screen output. Images on the Web are
              displayed "one pixel of the image take one pixel of the screen", so the
              specified resolution is irrelevant. But considering your specific request,
              is seems like this is not your case - people who are confused about Web
              output normally ask "how do I specify 72 ppi resolution?" :-)

              --
              Ilya Razmanov
              http://photoshop.msk.ru - Photoshop plug-in filters
              • 4. Re: 300dpi?
                Speedr Level 1
                I want to use this image for print use. So does it matter if its PPI, rather than DPI?
                • 5. Re: 300dpi?
                  Level 7
                  On Tue, 24 Jul 2007, Speedr wrote

                  >I want to use this image for print use. So does it matter if its PPI,
                  >rather than DPI?

                  "A rose by any other name....."

                  It's all very confusing :-)

                  Most graphics format files can store a value, or values, I'll call
                  "resolution number". This "resolution number" can relate to both a
                  recording device and a target device i.e. the device on which the image
                  is to be displayed.

                  With a recording device (scanner, camera) this "resolution number" tells
                  one something about the quality of an image as it represents the number
                  of samples per inch of the subject document or scene. With an image
                  created by other means there is no sampling and the "resolution number"
                  tells one nothing about the quality of the image.

                  When the target device is a printer then it's usual to think of this
                  "resolution number" as dpi (dots per inch) which is, of course,
                  completely mis-named as it confuses pixels with the dpi specifications
                  for a printer. A far more sensible name would be pppi (pixels per
                  printer inch) but most people call this number dpi and it's used it to
                  determine the physical size of the printed image on a piece of paper.
                  The dots in dpi are the pixels in the image to be printed and the inches
                  in dpi are physical inches, the sort you measure with a ruler on paper.
                  Divide the horizontal/vertical number of pixels in the image by the dpi
                  and you get the horizontal/vertical measurement of the image, in
                  physical inches, on paper

                  When the target device is a screen it's a different ball game. Some
                  people think of the "resolution number" here as ppi (pixels per inch)
                  where the pixels are in the image to be displayed, which is correct, and
                  the inches are physical inches on the screen, which is not correct.
                  Inches on screen in this context are NOT physical inches, that you can
                  measure with a ruler, but logical inches. For screen display of an image
                  one can think of the "resolution number" as ppsli (pixels per screen
                  logical inch). I explain logical inches on my site.

                  Some things to note:

                  The "resolution number" contained in a graphics file isn't actually a
                  single value but two values, one for the horizontal direction and one
                  for the vertical direction. These values are usually the same.
                  The GIF format can't contain a "resolution number".

                  There is a ppi value associated with a screen which uses real physical
                  inches, and that is when you divide the actual number of
                  horizontal/vertical pixel cells by the horizontal/vertical physical
                  screen dimensions. The number of pixels cells is simply given by the
                  maximum "screen resolution" the video card can provide e.g. 1024 x 768.
                  I did get some entertainment recently looking at this site
                  < http://macthemes2.net/forum/viewtopic.php?pid=164377> where they
                  calculate their screen physical ppi (which they call dpi) using the
                  nominal (diagonal) screen dimension and Pythagoras' Theorem. Very sad.

                  --
                  Richard Mason
                  http://www.emdpi.com
                  • 6. Re: 300dpi?
                    Level 7
                    On Tue, 24 Jul 2007 21:56:35 +0400, Speedr <webforumsuser@macromedia.com>
                    wrote:

                    > I want to use this image for print use. So does it matter if its PPI,
                    > rather than DPI?

                    No matter how it's called, it's still the same numerical value written
                    into image file header. I was just pointing out that

                    1) calling it DPI is not quite correct (although some software does it)

                    2) you should not be bothered by the fact that FW calls it PPI while you
                    was asked for DPI. This is merely a result of terms confusion.

                    --
                    Ilya Razmanov
                    http://photoshop.msk.ru - Photoshop plug-in filters
                    • 7. Re: 300dpi?
                      Speedr Level 1
                      Thanks for all the help and feedback! :)