11 Replies Latest reply on Sep 20, 2010 2:46 AM by Studio North Films

    What do videographers recommend in DVDplayer

    HarryPutnam Level 1

      As wannabee videographer, I've run into problems several times with my finished product... an authored dvd not playing on the customers dvd player, although it played on mine with no problems... some even won't play on all the three I have at home.

       

      Often the same problem  player will play a commercially produced DVD with no problem. (like a rented move)

       

      I use Tyo-yuden printable DVDs ... and just recently ran out of the last batch (bought long ago before the merger with JVC).  Also used up a couple of  25 pack of verbatem DataLifePlus.   In both brands the problem came up randomly.

       

      (DVD-r in both brands)

       

      I've surmised that homemade DVD are more iffy for playing than commercial grade products.

       

      I author with Encore and burn with a sony DRX-820UL-T or the burner on my sager NP8760 laptop, I forgotten the make offhand.

       

      The misfires don't seem to be related to where its burnt.

       

      But cutting to the chase, I wondered if there is a player that is generally seen as being a good candidate for Qaulity Control of the DVDs I produce?

       

      Or for example, if a customer were to ask me what player to use to be most likely to play there wedding or whatever DVD

        • 1. Re: What do videographers recommend in DVDplayer
          Stan Jones Adobe Community Professional & MVP

          My ultimate test machine is my son's portable (and now relatively older) portable DVD player.  If it will play a disk, they will play on anything.  Or so I claim; no solution is foolproof.  The DVD spec does not require set top players to play ANY burned disks.

           

          I have very few problems, so on very small runs, I do not test as rigorously as I used to.  On larger runs, I test on the 3 newer, regular size DVD players in the house and the portable.

           

          I have learned not to use the burner on my laptop to burn (but it is not a great laptop like a Sager).

           

          I do some things to maximize the chances of playing on lots of equipment.  for example, some older players will not play a DVD without the AUDIO_TS folder.  I doubt that is a real issue, but, since I burn with imgburn anyway, I let it add the audio_ts folder.

           

          Burn speeds are important for maximizing, and you'll see descriptions of using the lowest speed for a disk, nothing over 4x, and using the full rated speed.  I believe I should be burning at 4X, but I buy the Taiyo Yuden 8x DVD-R and burn them at 8x.  Never had many problems, so I keep it up.  since you're having problems, look at your burn speeds.

          • 2. Re: What do videographers recommend in DVDplayer
            the_wine_snob Level 9

            This ARTICLE will give you a bit of background on DVD set-top player compatibility.

             

            I have six different players, from a bargain-basement model, up through a Marantz esoteric, and test my DVD RW's one each, prior to doing a disc for delivery.

             

            Remember, no DVD player is required to play ANY burned DVD. Most will, if one uses good quality media, as a slower burn speed, but some just will not.

             

            Good luck,

             

            Hunt

            • 3. Re: What do videographers recommend in DVDplayer
              startrekfan22

              I would have to agree with the other posts on this

              one, since I have had problems in the past with DVD-

              R's not working in set-top DVD players.  I've got an old Goldstar set-top from 2001 and

              no DVD-R's will work in it, or if they do play they are choppy and just skip like crazy, and it doesn't matter whether I've burned the video on a computer, or if its a copy of a TV program that I recorded off of TV for my personal viewing on a DVD-Recorder.  Not all DVD players are going to be able to play DVD-R's.  If the person receiving the program doesn't care about the video quality, then I would recommned, in order for them to view it, give them a VHS copy along with the DVD, since VHS machines aren't picky about what type of VHS tape you are using. 

               

              But if you are sending it to an important client then make sure that your burner is set to its lowest speed to ensure that you get the deepest burn possible.  If you are able to go at 1x then go at 1x.

              • 4. Re: What do videographers recommend in DVDplayer
                HarryPutnam Level 1

                startrekfan22 wrote:

                 

                I would have to agree with the other posts on this

                one, since I have had problems in the past with DVD-

                R's not working in set-top DVD players.  I've got an old Goldstar set-top from 2001 and

                no DVD-R's will work in it, or if they do play they are choppy and just skip like crazy, and it doesn't matter whether I've burned the video on a computer, or if its a copy of a TV program that I recorded off of TV for my personal viewing on a DVD-Recorder.  Not all DVD players are going to be able to play DVD-R's.  If the person receiving the program doesn't care about the video quality, then I would recommned, in order for them to view it, give them a VHS copy along with the DVD, since VHS machines aren't picky about what type of VHS tape you are using. 

                 

                But if you are sending it to an important client then make sure that your burner is set to its lowest speed to ensure that you get the deepest burn possible.  If you are able to go at 1x then go at 1x.

                 

                Thanks to all for good input.

                 

                As the original poster, I feel compelled to comment here again, only because this last post run contrary to all I'd heard since I first started with videography (not that long... only about 3yrs off and on).

                 

                I'd heard repeatedly that DVD-r was THE one most likely to work in most cases.  Is that not the case?

                 

                Going by other posts on this thread, I'd say they have left room for the fact that there is some component of luck here.

                 

                No one has commented directly to one aspect:  Does it seem to be the case that home authoried and burnt  DVDS, even by skilled people, are not as reliable as commercially produced DVDs?

                 

                Message was edited by: HarryPutnam

                • 5. Re: What do videographers recommend in DVDplayer
                  the_wine_snob Level 9

                  There was a time, when the -R and +R designation made a lot of difference. Some units wanted one, while some wanted the other. Time has erased some of that type battle, but not all of it. A producer has no control over what equipment the user might have. In very general terms, the type is becoming moot, but it's not there yet.

                   

                  No one has commented directly to one aspect:  Does it seem to be the case that home authoried and burnt  DVDS, even by skilled people, are not as reliable as commercially produced DVDs?

                  Actually, I thought that I did, early on (will go up and check). No DVD player is certified to play ANY burned DVD - only commercially replicated, pressed ones. That is what the little "DVD" logo is about. Most players will handle burned DVD's, on high-quality media, and not burned at too high a speed. However, there are some that will not, no matter what brand, or burn speed is used. That is the "nature of the beast." One can only insure that as many steps have been taken to get the best possible burn, and then X their fingers a bit.

                   

                  Good luck,

                   

                  Hunt

                  • 6. Re: What do videographers recommend in DVDplayer
                    the_wine_snob Level 9

                    Here is that material from the article that I linked to:

                     

                    Let’s go back to the earliest days of DVD. During many years of technical and copyright wrangling, a specification was finally penned, and was almost universally implemented. The full specifications fill several volumes and cover all aspects of DVD’s. Many cover DVD-Videos, which is what I’ll talk about. This does not cover DVD-Data, or several other variations, some of which were never implemented. These DVD-Videos are what we burn to get our video movies onto a transport medium for play in all sorts of devices. These can include computers with software DVD players, to set-top players hooked up to a TV, or other display device.

                     

                    Back in those DVD-specs., it was determined that all set-top players MUST play replicated, i.e. pressed, as in a commercial DVD-Video release. This included both the DVD-5's (the single-sided, single layer ~ 4.37GB discs) and DVD-9's (most often known as DL or ~ 7.92GB discs). All set-top players with the "DVD" logo MUST play these.

                     

                    Now comes the problem, that so many of use face. We burn our DVD’s and do not send DLP tapes to a replication house. Instead, we use writable media and use a laser to "etch" a dye layer in the blank medium.

                     

                    No set-top player is required by anything in the DVD-spec. to play ANY of these discs.

                     

                    Wait! How can we burn DVD-Videos that WILL play our burned discs?

                     

                    Good news: most set-top players will play these burned discs, even though they do not have to do so.

                     

                    What can be done to insure that our DVD-Videos play on the greatest segment of the set-top players will play them.

                    Hope that this helps,

                     

                    Hunt

                    • 7. Re: What do videographers recommend in DVDplayer
                      startrekfan22 Level 1

                      If by "home burnt" you meanDVD-/+R's, then yes they are not as reliable as the glass DVD's that you buy pre-recorded shows and movies on in the stores.  But with DVD-/+R's even commercial houses such as, for example, Warner Brothers use the DVD-R's for their Manufacture-On-Demand programs and they do not work properly on all DVD set-top players.

                       

                      As far as the DVD-R/DVD+R debate, as far as I'm aware, some older DVD set-tops would not play the +R's while they would play the -R's, but for the newer DVD and Blu-Ray players they don't really have any problems with either + or -, as far as I'm aware.  Basically, make sure that you use the format that your burner can handle.

                      • 8. Re: What do videographers recommend in DVDplayer
                        HarryPutnam Level 1
                        No one has commented directly to one aspect:  Does it seem to be the case that home authoried and burnt  DVDS, even by skilled people, are not as reliable as commercially produced DVDs?

                        Actually, I thought that I did, early on (will go up and check). No DVD player is certified to play ANY burned DVD - only commercially replicated, pressed ones. That is what the little "DVD" logo is about. Most players will handle burned DVD's, on high-quality media, and not burned at too high a speed. However, there are some that will not, no matter what brand, or burn speed is used. That is the "nature of the beast." One can only insure that as many steps have been taken to get the best possible burn, and then X their fingers a bit.

                        And so you did, or at least referred to some info regarding that.

                         

                        Somehow I completely missed the first line of your post where the citation is.  Not sure why, maybe my eye was atracted to the part about having 6 players, since I remember thinking that was really the only `good' approach.   And I see from your citation that crossing of fingers does play a role.

                         

                        Thanks.... Sorry for my sloppy reading of your first reply.

                        • 9. Re: What do videographers recommend in DVDplayer
                          HarryPutnam Level 1

                          HarryPutnam wrote:

                           

                          No one has commented directly to one aspect:  Does it seem to be the case that home authoried and burnt  DVDS, even by skilled people, are not as reliable as commercially produced DVDs?

                          Actually, I thought that I did, early on (will go up and check). No DVD player is certified to play ANY burned DVD - only commercially replicated, pressed ones. [...]

                          And so you did, or at least referred to some info regarding that.

                           

                          Back once more to thank you again.  I've now started pretty well into the treasure trove of material that your citation leads to, and must say it is a true treasure trove.  I've managed to miss all this good information for  sometime and have been plagued by the problem a few times.

                           

                          So once again THANKS

                          • 10. Re: What do videographers recommend in DVDplayer
                            Bill Gehrke Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                            This is a side comment on producing settop box readbility

                             

                            I have found that recently with CS5 (v 5.0.2) that I have the highest success rate and the best quality when I am downscaling  and encoding in Premiere from my Sony AVCHD media to MPEG2-DVD by using the default settings for the preset "Match source Attributes--Highest Quality".  When I tried optimizing beyond this my success rate in player compatibility went down.

                            • 11. Re: What do videographers recommend in DVDplayer
                              Studio North Films Level 3

                              I have found two brands of disk that i only use.

                               

                              single layer dvd: datawrite titanium printable

                              dual layer dvd: Verbatim printable

                               

                              It is very very rare that I have an issue with the discs.

                               

                              I also burn at a slow speed.

                               

                              my settings are from high to low, 8-7-4

                               

                              Baz