16 Replies Latest reply on Sep 21, 2010 4:05 PM by the_wine_snob

    A Bright and Sunny Day

    expeditionwest Level 1

      And THAT is my problem.

       

      Here in Arizona, we have NO shortage of EXTREMELY BRIGHT and sunny days. Heck, even yesterday Sept 20, it was 107 degrees.

       

      I was able to capture some beautiful footage of a walking interview scene in a historic courthouse with it's alabaster white walls.

      Despite the fact that I aperatured down my camera, the white is just too darn bright. We had to shoot there and then because of the features we wanted included, which were some beautiful staircases and their copper-clad bannisters.

       

      My subject is well lit, but not too well lit to 'pasty' the face. My problem is the ultra bright walls behind the subject.

       

      Does anyone know which of the (or combination) of the new features CS5PrePro has to help either change or darken the evenly lit bright background walls?

       

      Not to sound like an old record again, PrePro 1.5 had color replacer, which I used to tone down evenly lit bright backgrounds. I would place the original footage on track1, layer the same footage on track2, replace the bright background with a darker tone on track2, then reduce the opacity of track2 to blend with track1, thereby reducing the background glare.  I'm not finding color replacer in the CS5 package and wonder if someone here has some tips and tricks to help me reduce the background glare.

       

      Thanks

       

      expeditionwest

        • 1. Re: A Bright and Sunny Day
          Colin Brougham Level 6

          Curves, RGB or Luma. You can use it compress the highlights and bring them down to a more acceptable level.

          • 2. Re: A Bright and Sunny Day
            the_wine_snob Level 9

            I would look at Highlight & Shadow Effect (make sure to take off of Auto), and see if you can tamp down the highlights a bit, while leaving the shadows pretty much alone. Normally, this Effect is most often used to open up shadows, while leaving the highlights alone, so when you turn Auto OFF, you will get a default for addressing the shadows.

             

            Not sure how much action you have in the "walking interview," but if subject is perfect, and you only want to address the background, you might want to think about doing a Track Matte Key for just that background. This TUTORIAL is for addressing soften skin tones of a subject, and your use would be just the opposite, leaving the subject untouched, and instead of Blur, you'd add an Effect like Levels (or Shadow & Highlight), so your Matte would be the opposite.

             

            Good luck,

             

            Hunt

            • 3. Re: A Bright and Sunny Day
              Harm Millaard Level 7

              Another approach might be to duplicate the clip on a higher track and use an Ultra key to replace the background and then play with opacity.

              1 person found this helpful
              • 4. Re: A Bright and Sunny Day
                expeditionwest Level 1

                Yea, Harm - I find doing the overlay thing works well, then blending it.

                 

                I'm going to play with all three suggestions, will let y'all know what produced the best result.

                 

                Thanks

                 

                expeditionwest
                • 5. Re: A Bright and Sunny Day
                  expeditionwest Level 1

                  Well all, thus far I've experimented with the ALPHA ADJUST effect, brought it down about to 60% and it seems to have darkened the severe white background yet maintained the foreground subject without a problem.

                   

                  The other experiments produces mixed but not satisfying results. ALPHA ADJUST seems to have worked fine.

                   

                  Thanks for the tips - I'll surely apply them when needed later.

                   

                  expeditionwest

                  • 6. Re: A Bright and Sunny Day
                    the_wine_snob Level 9

                    Great news and thanks for reporting your success.

                     

                    Good luck,

                     

                    Hunt

                    • 7. Re: A Bright and Sunny Day
                      Colin Brougham Level 6
                      I've experimented with the ALPHA ADJUST effect, brought it down about to 60% and it seems to have darkened the severe white background yet maintained the foreground subject without a problem.

                       

                      While you may have visually corrected the problem to your taste, you may have inadvertently created a new problem for yourself. The Alpha Adjust effect, well, adjusts a clip's alpha channel, NOT it's RGB values. In practice, it's similar to changing the opacity of a clip. What you're doing is lowering the opacity of your clip and letting the "black" behind it show through. However, "black" in a Premiere Pro sequence is not black; it's actually transparency. As such, anything you might have behind this clip will show through.

                       

                      If you want to use the effect in this way (which I certainly wouldn't recommend), be sure to add a black video clip or black graphic behind the clip so that when you export (depending on the codec you use), you're actually comping the clip against black, not transparency.

                      1 person found this helpful
                      • 8. Re: A Bright and Sunny Day
                        expeditionwest Level 1

                        Actually Colin, I put a very light, almost light tan color matte behind the clip. Honestly, I'm not technically up to snuff on the alpha channel or anything film (but I'm learning), but I found something that worked, checked it on an NTSC screen (LCD and old tube) and it looks great after I exported a small movie of the clip.

                         

                        Sometimes I've got to fly in the face of convention and get things working - sigh - that's my life story  .

                        • 9. Re: A Bright and Sunny Day
                          expeditionwest Level 1

                          Colin -

                           

                          Good point you brought up about codecs.

                           

                          Can you tell me this?

                           

                          If I export (the effect I'm talking about) to an AVI, then burn it to my DV- re-recordable DVD, then play it on my two different DVD players (and my computer player) -AND- it looks good, umm - did I go wrong?

                           

                          I've so much to learn.

                           

                          expeditionwest

                          • 10. Re: A Bright and Sunny Day
                            the_wine_snob Level 9

                            Considering where you have tested the footage, I'd say that if you are satisfied with it, you should be good to go.

                             

                            Now, if you later Import that AVI and do something like a PiP with it, there could be material showing through, kind of like the way the weather map shows up when the weatherman forgets and wears a jacket with certain shades of green in it.

                             

                            Good luck,

                             

                            Hunt

                            • 11. Re: A Bright and Sunny Day
                              expeditionwest Level 1

                              Bill -

                               

                              You mean to tell me that even though it's now a finished AVI, processed and all, that down the road if I use that FINISHED (rendered, made into a movie and all that rot) AVI in a PIP, something might show through?

                               

                              Man, I'm thinking in terms of CONCRETE. Once it's set, it can't be unset. Am I close?

                               

                              expeditionwest

                              • 12. Re: A Bright and Sunny Day
                                shooternz Level 6

                                I think I would have tried"

                                 

                                Luma Key (basic)

                                Ultra Key (refined)

                                or... Colorista II Secondary Key (maximum control and refinement)

                                 

                                I think I would have placed a Levels "crushed" version of the original clip below as the BG

                                • 13. Re: A Bright and Sunny Day
                                  the_wine_snob Level 9

                                  If you have not Exported with an Alpha Channel (Millions of Colors +), then you will be fine with your Exported AVI, as Transparency in Video only comes with the Alpha Channel. Sorry, but I had my Photoshop hat on, and did not think that one through completely. Heck, some days I can't even tell which forum I'm in at the moment.

                                   

                                  Hunt

                                  • 14. Re: A Bright and Sunny Day
                                    Stan Jones Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                                    For the learning process:

                                     

                                    Other than trying to compensate for these conditions with aperture, are there other approaches that would make this easier to address in post.  for example, some cameras (I don't think mine) have built in neutral density filter options.  And there are obviously many addon filters for the camera.

                                    • 15. Re: A Bright and Sunny Day
                                      shooternz Level 6

                                      If you are shooting a scene like this with a bright BG you have two photographic "issues" to deal with.  Fore ground & BG

                                       

                                      Expose using aperture control so the white BG is in range ( ie less than 100% - Zebras) and you may end up with the  fg (subject ) under exposed.

                                       

                                      ND filters do not help because they affect the whole scene.

                                       

                                      The only solution is to light the FG (subject) to balance out the scene.  Light with units or reflectors.

                                       

                                      This is a situation best dealt with when shooting  rather than fixing it in post.

                                      • 16. Re: A Bright and Sunny Day
                                        the_wine_snob Level 9

                                        I agree with Craig. It is like lighting an interior space with windows viewing a brightly lit scene beyond. If you want the viewer to be able to see through those windows, and to the scene beyond, and also the interior, you have to bring the interior levels up. Though in that case, one could put ND film on the windows - carefully, very carefully.

                                         

                                        If I remember, this was a walking interview, so lighting the subject, as they moved about, and keeping that light off of the white walls would require some effort. An assistant with a soft reflector walking in front of the subject might have gotten some more fill onto the subject.

                                         

                                        Just my thoughts,

                                         

                                        Hunt