4 Replies Latest reply on Jan 25, 2013 4:10 PM by Todd_Kopriva

    Color Management between AE and Pre Pro

    Cris is Bliss Level 1

      Hello,

       

      I'm posting this in both the AE and Premiere Pro Forums

       

      I was working on clip in Pr Pro, sent it over to AE to do some color correcting.  Normally when I have the 2 programs open, one is on my Apple Cinema Display monitor and the other is on my old HP monitor, so I expect to see some color differences.  However, by chance I had both on the apple monitor and noticed that there was a color/luminance difference of the same exact clip on the different programs.

       

      Which Program is displaying the true colors???????? 

       

      Which program should I use to make my coloring decisions?

       

      Should it be the program that will be doing the final render once the project is complete??

       

      Is there a way to make the 2 programs uniform????

       

      Lastly, if I choose a color management in AE project settings, should it be my monitor, NONE, or what?  This color management issue is very confusing with so many different choices.

       

      You guys (Adobe) need to simplify this.

       

      Thank You

       

      I'm using CS4 on a Mac OS 10.5.8.

        • 1. Re: Color Management between AE and Pre Pro
          Mylenium Most Valuable Participant

          CM is never simple and trust me, it is a lot easier today than it was 10 years ago. Regarding these issues, there is no simple answer here, I'm afraid. Premiere shows you a preview and you should take that very literally. It is in most cases not color exact which relates to chroma undersampling being used in many footage types and possible Gamma shifts plus however your monitor is mis-tweaked. Premiere however recognizes a monitor profile and can correct for it, if one exists and is assigned. Still, if it is just a generic factory profile and not a specific manual calibration profile this doesn't help you in any way. Also note that some Premiere effects and transitions do not operate in RGB to begin with, but use YCbCr/ YUV as their color space, as has been common for eons in video editing... So you see, a whole lot of complication. The simple truth here is, that the only true verification of video output still comes from an external monitor and scopes. AE on the other hand has a full color metrics engine. how to set that up is explained in a few documents on the help pages. it doesn't realyl solve your problem, since if you don't calibrate your monitor, the colors technically would still be off, but it might give you some more insights in what you need to do to improve your predicatbility...

           

          Mylenium

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          • 3. Re: Color Management between AE and Pre Pro
            ronfya Level 1

            Sorry to bring up an old thread but I need to clarify the following.

            Mylenium wrote:

             

            The simple truth here is, that the only true verification of video output still comes from an external monitor and scopes. AE on the other hand has a full color metrics engine. how to set that up is explained in a few documents on the help pages. it doesn't realyl solve your problem, since if you don't calibrate your monitor, the colors technically would still be off, but it might give you some more insights in what you need to do to improve your predicatbility...

            Does that mean that

            • if we have a calibrated computer screen with a custom ICC profile
            • and if we had color management in apps such as Premiere,

            then, we wouldn't need an external calibratred broadcast monitor to do the grading ?

             

            Equally, does that mean that one could do quite accurate grading on a calibrated computer monitor using AE with color management enabled ?

             

            Thanks

            • 4. Re: Color Management between AE and Pre Pro
              Todd_Kopriva Level 8

              If you are using a computer monitor that has a large enough gamut to display the colors of your target device, and if that computer monitor is calibrated correctly, you will be able to simulate the target device and use the computer monitor for color grading and other color work.

               

              Be sure to read up on the basics of color management here:

              http://help.adobe.com/en_US/aftereffects/cs/using/WS61A9D13D-919A-4010-A3A2-00477A81FDB0a. html

               

              Be especially sure to read this paper:

              http://www.adobe.com/go/learn_ae_colormanagementpaper

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