5 Replies Latest reply on Dec 3, 2010 12:51 PM by Colin Brougham

    Preparing longer clips (interview) for a better overview? – Markers? Subclips? Etc.?

    Michael720

       

      Hello! I am new to PP!

       

      I am working with longer clips of interviews (10-20 min) and I would like to prepare them so I get an overview about the passages of each clip that I might use for a sequence later on. - In FCP I could not only set markers in the source! window but also edit/name/colorize them. So I would name many markers after text passages in a clip in the source window.

       

      In PP this seems to be only possible in the sequence window which is too late for an overview.
      Any suggestions? Subclips?

       

      Thank you very much for your help! - Michael

        • 1. Re: Preparing longer clips (interview) for a better overview? – Markers? Subclips? Etc.?
          Colin Brougham Level 6

          You can subclip for this, but I'm personally not a huge fan of subclips in Premiere, so I usually don't use them. They just act... weird. I guess they are functional, but I usually find that when I attempt to use them, I'm limited and end up having to find work arounds. It's hard to be more specific than that; I was accustomed to subclipping in Avid which works much better.

           

          Despite that glowing review, if you want to subclip, probably the easiest way to do it is to load your source clip into the Source Monitor, mark in and out points, and then hold down Ctrl/Cmd and drag from the Source Monitor back to a bin. This will pop up a dialog letting you name the subclip, and then drop the subclip into the bin. You can continue this way until you've created all your subclips.

           

          As far as markers go, I think you're correct: I don't believe there is a way to add named markers to a clip in the Source Monitor. I'm not positive about this, as I've never tried to do that. As far as I'm aware, the only markers that can be named are sequence markers. You might want to make a feature request here: Adobe - Feature Request/Bug Report Form

           

          My usual method of dealing with long interviews is sort of a hybrid subclipping approach. Basically, I create a sequence for each interview subject, and then either drop the full-length interview clips into that sequence and chunk it up, renaming the segments as I go, or I load into the Source Monitor and do the in-out routine and drop those into the sequence. Maybe it's lazy, but I find myself doing the former more than the latter; it's easy to see where an interview response begins and ends (usually) by looking at the waveform peaks in the audio clip. After I chunk out all the pieces, I just listen to the bite and name the clip instance in a manner that lets me figure out what the content of the bite is quickly. I then have a workspace set up with two Timeline panels, where I can drag a bite I want to use into my working edit. I adopted this approach after I more-or-less got skunked by subclipping, and it's worked well for me. There are obviously a number of ways you can go about this, so just experiment until you find the one that works for you.

          • 2. Re: Preparing longer clips (interview) for a better overview? – Markers? Subclips? Etc.?
            Michael720 Level 1

            Thank you so much for you long and detailed answer. I will try it out! - However I am somehow shocked that Premiere CS 5 is not able so set and edit markers in the source window and see them neatly listed in the clip browser as in FCP.

            Whenever I read something or see an instructional video about editing experienced editors always stress the point of being organized almost as the essence of editing which I do understand. - But why is Adobe developing cuda etc. while obviously neglecting such a crucial issue which propably does not even take a fraction of the programming time invested in cuda ????????????
            However many thanks again for your answer!!!!

            • 3. Re: Preparing longer clips (interview) for a better overview? – Markers? Subclips? Etc.?
              Colin Brougham Level 6
              But why is Adobe developing cuda etc. while obviously neglecting such a crucial issue which propably does not even take a fraction of the programming time invested in cuda ????????????

               

              I can't answer that; only someone from the product team can do that. The engineering squad seems pretty responsive to user input these days, but not every single want and desire can make it into the program in a given development cycle. As such, using the feature request form (Adobe - Feature Request/Bug Report Form) is the best way to communicate priorities to the Adobe folks.

               

              I won't dispute the usefulness of named clip markers in the Source Monitor, but I would speculate that being able to stack layers of video with multiple effects and not having to render a single frame of it would sell many more copies of the software than clip markers

              1 person found this helpful
              • 4. Re: Preparing longer clips (interview) for a better overview? – Markers? Subclips? Etc.?
                davidbeisner2010 Level 3

                One additional note on subclips... They don't have handles. That's the one thing that's really burned me on subclips before in interview situations. So if you're gonna make a subclip, make sure to give yourself good handles cause you won't be able to adjust it outwards later!

                • 5. Re: Preparing longer clips (interview) for a better overview? – Markers? Subclips? Etc.?
                  Colin Brougham Level 6

                  One additional note on subclips... They don't have handles.

                   

                  And that's the primary reason I find them to be just this side of useless, and recommend against their use. You can use the Edit Subclip dialog and the "Convert to Master Clip" option, but that's pretty clunky and, frankly, worthless, since all it does is create a duplicate of your original master clip. It even trashes your in and out points, so I can't see the use of this.

                   

                  The upshot of all this is that subclips need a serious makeover, and there more people offering useful ideas to this end, the better: Adobe - Feature Request/Bug Report Form