7 Replies Latest reply on Dec 14, 2010 12:48 AM by Mylenium

    Using a seperate SSD in rendering videos

    demogorgon2010

      Does anyone know if using a separate (from the OS) SSD help in rendering videos?

      I was thinking of getting a separate 40GB SATA SSD to keep the current footage and use for rendering only. I'm desperately trying to cut down time in rendering in AE and increases the performance.

        • 1. Re: Using a seperate SSD in rendering videos
          TimeRemapper Level 4

          Ideally, you'd want 3 separate volumes to maximize speed. One for the OS/app, one for the source files, and one render volume.

          • 2. Re: Using a seperate SSD in rendering videos
            demogorgon2010 Level 1

            I'm using a laptop, what would be the difference if I used an external SATA SSD that holds the videos that are rendered to the same drive. Are you saying using one to store and a separate one to render would be quicker?

            • 3. Re: Using a seperate SSD in rendering videos
              TimeRemapper Level 4

              Are you saying using one to store and a separate one to render would be quicker?

              Yes. This way any given drive can be dedicated to reading or writing as opposed to preforming both tasks.

              • 4. Re: Using a seperate SSD in rendering videos
                demogorgon2010 Level 1

                You don't think that all these connections would create sort of a bottle neck (if we are talking about different drives)?

                Or one drive for video with two partitions one for rough video the second for rendered, less connections?

                Do you think either setup would create significant changes (I do understand the SSD is supposedly 30% quicker with HD but reality doesn't always cooperate).

                • 5. Re: Using a seperate SSD in rendering videos
                  Mylenium Most Valuable Participant

                  None of what you are saying actually makes sense. Compared to editing programs, AE's footage I/O requirements are still minor and you're not gonna tell me that you will be rendering with multiprocessing and 8 background instances on a notebook... So for what it's worth, you are probably wasting your money and won't see any difference. That being said, SSDs still are not meant for overwriting the same memory cells a gigazillion times in a short while, so even if you did it, chances are you would ruin your drive pretty quickly. All that SLC vs. MLC and TRIM discussion won't save your bacon, it's inherent in how it works. For the cost of an SSD, you could buy a basic dual disk RAID and enjoy it much more plus have a lot more storage to work with...

                   

                  Mylenium

                  • 6. Re: Using a seperate SSD in rendering videos
                    Nav Parker

                    Not relating to AE (so getting a little OT), but in hard drives, there's only one head mechanism that can only be in one place at a time. This physical location limitation wouldn't seem to be an issue with SSDs. Can't they read and write simultaneously?

                    • 7. Re: Using a seperate SSD in rendering videos
                      Mylenium Most Valuable Participant

                      Not relating to AE (so getting a little OT), but in hard drives, there's only one head mechanism that can only be in one place at a time. This physical location limitation wouldn't seem to be an issue with SSDs. Can't they read and write simultaneously?

                       

                      They can, but it's not that simple, either. The decisive factor for SSDs really is which memory cells at which address are being used and whether or not they are unused or need to be overwritten. The magic in an SSD is in the controller chip just like it is in a conventional magnetic drive. In both cases they will try to write to empty locations/ sectors on the drives first to avoid having to overwrite data the existing data is only flagged as unused/ invalid by switching a few bytes. That what leads to fragmentation, but also allows to reconstruct data. On SSDs this is complicated by the fact that for the time being they offer less capacity, which may allow to write files partially to empty areas, but still require to truly overwrite cells. Depending on their physicall address and how they correlate to the different chip packages, this may mean erasing data in multiple locations before writing the new one and that is still done on the same lanes that are also used for reading. So in a worst case scenario, if the drive is choka full already, any file I/O operation will cause wait cycles somewhere. Of course that is also true for magnetic discs then, however, and that brings me back to my original point: A flash memory cell can be overwritten about 10000 times before it burns out, a magnetic disc sector at least 100000 times up to a million times. If you use an SSD exclusively for all your footage I/O, you will pretty quickly exhaust its lifecycle. Also let's not kid ourselves: Unless you use specific PCIe Card Flash drives of the expensive variety, the normal ones acting like an SATA drive will never reach the maximum theoretical transfer rates, so the speed argument doesn't really make much sense (and then again would you ever notice for just AE?). SSDs no doubt make sense as boot drives and as a nice way to store data on the road, but for a home setup I'd always go with a platter drive, which may also apply to a notebook primarily used at home and at school.

                       

                      Mylenium