4 Replies Latest reply on Dec 15, 2010 12:25 PM by pziecina

    HTML5 and IE

    teedoffnewbie Level 2

      Ok been playing around with HTML5 and so far I like it. Of course I havent delved into the more advanced tags new to verison5 yet. My question though is this. With my limited understanding and reading on the new standards of how browsers support, or dont support, html5 I was under the impression that all current versions of IE supported even the basics of the new html5 standards.

       

      For a perfect example. In creating a new html5 basic layout using the header, footer, article, and nav tags, I'm still forced to do some hacks for IE to style these tags, since they are not defined as a class or id name I assume.

       

      Personally I hate writing hacks for IE and avoid them like the plague! lol Will this be the norm from now on? Will IE9 change all that? How long, if IE8 doesnt support these tags, will we be forced to write hacks for this browser.

        • 1. Re: HTML5 and IE
          pziecina Adobe Community Professional

          Hi

           

          Of the IE versions only IE9, (currently in beta) supports html5, all previous versions will require the IE hack and that is only to enable styling. There are a few javascript files available that 'simulate' a few other html5 elements in IE versions prior to IE9, (such as canvas) but these slow those browsers down considerably.

           

          How long, if IE8 doesn't support these tags, will we be forced to write hacks for this browser.

           

          As long as people support these earlier versions then hacks will be required, and if the IE6 is an example of peoples reluctance to upgrade then we are talking about 10+ years, although personally I do not expect IE6 or IE7 to last more than another 2 to 4 years, mainly due to microsoft stopping support of the XP os in 2014.

          But along with others that are saying this I could be wrong, mainly due to many people not even knowing that they can change or update browsers or even that alternative browsers exist, after all in a survey by Google earlier this year more than 90% of users did not even know what a browser was, (it is that blue e symbol isn't it!!).

           

          PZ

          • 2. Re: HTML5 and IE
            padurar2010

            Do not  forget that though HTML5 is the future and will certainly be supported  by all browsers.tinctura de propolis It is now a pioneering  period but it certainly will pass quickly and consumers will only use  advanced browsers, and designers HTML5miere de albine

            • 3. Re: HTML5 and IE
              teedoffnewbie Level 2

              All these points are true. The fact is though, that while HTML 5 IS the future of web design, I can thelp but think of the past and how IE has lagged severely in keeping up with html/css technology. Truthfully, html 4 has been out since when? 1997 or so, and how many version of IE has been released since html 4's inception, yet IE still refuses to allow designers and coders to implement many techniques WITHOUT hacks. The history of IE to me suggests that they still arent willing to adhere to whatever new standards will be introduced in html5 and css3. The very fact that the still current version of IE(8) doesn't support the html5 page division names is somewhat confusing to me. I thought that the whole internet buzz over the new html and how all these browser companies sent delegates to be part of this team of coders and developers in order to develope the best most cross browser compliant html standard to date.

               

              History also shows that while several version of IE have been released, many ppl are still using older, outdated versions simply because they dont know any different, or they are forced to by company policies.

               

              Thats all I was saying. Just my opinion and observation.

              • 4. Re: HTML5 and IE
                pziecina Adobe Community Professional

                Hi

                The very fact that the still current version of IE(8) doesn't support
                the html5 page division names is somewhat confusing to me. I thought
                that the whole internet buzz over the new html and how all these browser
                companies sent delegates to be part of this team of coders and
                developers in order to develope the best most cross browser compliant
                html standard to date.

                 

                Believe it or not IE5 and IE6 where the most compliant browsers for html and css when they where released, and it was only when the css specs for css2.1 where candidate recommendations and supported by Safari and Mozilla, (I am talking about V1 of these browsers, released 2-3 years after IE6) that they became noticeably 'broken'.

                 

                You only need to read a few of the comments posted in replies on the DW forums relating to using the modules/rules of css3 that are candidate recommendations in order to realize how slow and reluctant many designers/developers are to use anything that is not in general use, (progressive enhancements are not regarded by many as the norm). If many designers/developers will not use the features then why expect clients or browser developers to worry about support and more importantly, if users do not see a better experience in more modern/compliant browsers then why should they update/upgrade?

                 

                (for the last point above, join in the discussions in the DW general section and offer support for html5 and css3 usage, as I am getting tired of being 'shot down')

                 

                As for Microsoft and IE8, they where not a part of the 'group' that developed html5 as this was not done by the W3C, (they have no such excuse for css3 however). But when you remember that Adobe did not want to support html5/css3 in CS5, (it was not in the initial release) and had to release it as an extension after much criticism from both users, (myself included) and the press, then IE8 not supporting these features is not surprising as it was released a year before CS5.

                IE9 does support html5 and some of css3, (though not enough) and the IE developers decided to do so before Adobe decided to support them in Dreamweaver.

                 

                PZ