10 Replies Latest reply on Dec 10, 2010 1:03 PM by Colin Brougham

    CS5 Export 30+ hours for DVD or Bluray?

    teamhood Level 1

      Hey all,

       

      I was wondering if these numbers are really correct? I am exporting a 1.5 hour concert that is 5 angles. I have everything cut and fades added. I am now in the process of exporting (File > Export > Media) using the h.264 bluray (high setting, with 2 pass checked). I was shocked to see that the estimated time is now creeping up to 35 hours?

       

      I also tried to use the Queue function to bring this and the DVD render to AME, but the bluray was about 40 hours over there, with the DVD about the same.

       

      I know my PC is not the fastest, but in PPro CS3 I never saw these kinds of times!

       

      PC Spec:

      Q6600 QuadCore

      4GB RAM

      Gigabyte MOBO

      GeForce 9500 Graphics card.

       

      I know it's not the fastest computer with the i7's out, but I am just shocked at the switch from CS3 to CS5. Is this normal because of my Q6600? I am pricing out a new PC now to include i7, 12GB RAM, and a CUDA GPU (looking at the GTX470)

       

      Thank you for any help.

        • 1. Re: CS5 Export 30+ hours for DVD or Bluray?
          teamhood Level 1

          I should note that in the Task Manager Premiere Pro is taking up 99-100% of the CPU and about 1GB of RAM. So it's using up my CPU.... I am just a bit shocked by the 30+ hours....

           

          Also there are maybe 10 other processes running, but they are not taking up any CPU/RAM that is worth mentioning.

          • 2. Re: CS5 Export 30+ hours for DVD or Bluray?
            Harm Millaard Level 7

            What do you mean by this:

             

            I am exporting a 1.5 hour concert that is 5 angles.

             

            PR does not support multi-angle AFAIK.

             

            Your system is at least 10 times slower than a fast system, posibbly even slower, so one would have to say that a 1.5 hour sequence with 2-pass encoding would take around 35/10 = 3.5 hours with 2-pass encoding and thus around 1.75 hours encoding with single pass on a fast system, without hardware MPE. That sounds about right.

            • 3. Re: CS5 Export 30+ hours for DVD or Bluray?
              teamhood Level 1

              Harm,

               

              I am far from being a guru when it comes to video editing and have always done it as a hobby. While you can only multiclip 4 angles at once in PPro CS5, it doesn't stop one from still being able to go through the edited 4cam and sync up a 5th angle and go through and cut how I use to back in the day before FCP provided a multicam function....

               

              So I indeed did edit a 5 camera angle concert that is 1.5 hours in length. I am rendering out a bluray and DVD version of this concert, which is something that I have been doing for years, well the DVD render. I hardly find that my Q6600 is unable to render a DVD @ 8mbps 2-pass faster than 41 hours, which is the current estimate after a few hours of rendering. My old DP G4 was able to render a DVD in under 12 hours. Not to mention CS3 I was able to render a similar edit within 6 hours on this exact same PC.

               

              So while an i7 CPU might be 10x faster than a Q6600, I still do not understand how an old G4 DP 867mhz could render the same task much, much faster.

              • 4. Re: CS5 Export 30+ hours for DVD or Bluray?
                Colin Brougham Level 6

                You might have the Maximum Render Quality box checked in the Export Settings window; that will cause approximately a six-fold increase in encoding time.

                1 person found this helpful
                • 5. Re: CS5 Export 30+ hours for DVD or Bluray?
                  Mike Tomei Level 1

                  Do you instead mean he might have the "Render At Maximum Bit Depth" box checked?  That's the one that seems to add lots of time to my exports.  Since the "Render At Maximum Bit Depth" box adds a crazy amout of time to an export, does anyone use it?  What would be a scenario where one would want to use that check box?

                   

                  Thanks.

                   

                  Mike

                  • 6. Re: CS5 Export 30+ hours for DVD or Bluray?
                    Colin Brougham Level 6

                    Nope, I mean MRQ. In my experience, MRQ creates much more of a speed hit than Maximum Bit Depth does.

                     

                    Since the "Render At Maximum Bit Depth" box adds a crazy amout of time to an export, does anyone use it?  What would be a scenario where one would want to use that check box?

                     

                    Funny you should ask that We're having a lively discussion of this very thing in Bit Depth and Render Quality.

                     

                    In short, I always use it if I'm exporting a final version of a finished video, regardless of the source and destination. The consequences of not using it are unacceptable, in my opinion.

                    • 7. Re: CS5 Export 30+ hours for DVD or Bluray?
                      Mike Tomei Level 1

                      OK, I'm glad this came up.  That other thread you gave a link to is a great conversation.

                       

                      So for all my final product encodes, I never check "use previews", always use "maximum render quality", and never check "Render At Maximum Bit Depth".  For some reason I got it in my head that it added an excessive amount of time to my encoding process.  I must have experienced that once, then decided to never use it again.

                       

                      As usual, thanks for the info!

                      • 8. Re: CS5 Export 30+ hours for DVD or Bluray?
                        Colin Brougham Level 6

                        As with anything, there are few hard-and-fast rules that can simply be applied without consideration of the consequences; sometimes, 1 + 1 = 3 (told you I got into video to avoid math).

                         

                        Your mileage may vary with your footage, your applied effects, and your destination. I suggest taking the time to perform your own battery of tests with your materials, and then doing any qualitative measurements that you can. You may find that, for some applications, the additional burden of time required for this or that may not be worth the end result.

                         

                        Personally, I throw caution to the wind and enable Maximum Bit Depth for everything... but then again, I'm crazy like dat.

                        • 9. Re: CS5 Export 30+ hours for DVD or Bluray?
                          teamhood Level 1

                          Colin,

                           

                          I really appreciate you taking time to open my forum post. I am still rendering as we speak and I do not believe that those check boxes for either Render at Max Depth nor Use Max Render Quality are checked...

                           

                          I have about 20 hours remaining and I can confirm at that time. I decided to kill the DVD render last night and instead went with a h.264 bluray render. It's chugging now and I will update tomorrow any findings.

                          • 10. Re: CS5 Export 30+ hours for DVD or Bluray?
                            Colin Brougham Level 6

                            Hmm... interesting. Those times are pretty long, even with the system you're running--seriously, I think my phone is faster

                             

                            Post back once it's done, and let us know the results and what the export settings were. In the famous words of somebody, "There's gotta be a better way!"