8 Replies Latest reply on Dec 23, 2010 8:20 PM by Noel Carboni

    Data at bottom of ACR screen

    alinagum

      I have long wondered what the information at the bottom the the screen means... especially the resolution.  Why is it there?  What should I be doing with it?

       

      Screen shot 2010-12-22 at 4.39.17 PM.jpg

        • 1. Re: Data at bottom of ACR screen
          Jeff Schewe Level 5

          Uh, it's pretty darn important....it acts as both info and button to allow you to change color space and resolution. Pretty basic stuff...

          • 2. Re: Data at bottom of ACR screen
            alinagum Level 1

            Yes, Jeff, and thank you.  I knew that (I think) but people have advised me NEVER to change resolution using that dialog box before I open the file.  I don't know why (in my screen shot) it shows 240ppi but I usually want 300ppi.

            • 3. Re: Data at bottom of ACR screen
              Jeff Schewe Level 5

              The click on the info/button and change it to 300PPI. As long as you don't alter the interpolation, the PPI resolution is merely a metadata tag (meaning it doesn't alter the actual pixel width and height).

              • 4. Re: Data at bottom of ACR screen
                Noel Carboni Level 7
                function(){return A.apply(null,[this].concat($A(arguments)))}

                alinagum wrote:

                 

                people have advised me NEVER to change resolution using that dialog box before I open the file.

                 

                Never say never.

                 

                All the fields in that dialog are subject to change.  That's why there's a dialog allowing you to configure these things.

                 

                • The Color Space sets the document color profile.  There are bona fide good reasons, such as no loss of information because of gamut limitations, for changing from the default Adobe RGB to ProPhoto RGB color space.  There are also reasons why someone might choose sRGB.

                 

                • The Depth value of 16 bits is probably preferable, as this sets the document up to be edited with more accuracy, but there can also be good reasons for using 8.

                 

                • There are people (I'm one of 'em) who say converting directly to an upsampled Size can be a good thing, and there are others who say to always use the camera's native pixel count.

                 

                • As Jeff described, the Resolution ppi value just presets some metadata that affects your Image Size dialog once you get into Photoshop.

                 

                • Sharpen might be best left at None, but it depends on what you like to see in your images.  Many folks prefer to do sharpening as one of the last steps in editing, not as one of the first.

                 

                You're doing the right thing by trying to understand what these settings do and why you might want to set them one way or another.

                 

                -Noel

                • 5. Re: Data at bottom of ACR screen
                  Conrad C Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                  There is one crucial question that affects whether you should care about the Workflow Options: Where are you sending the image from ACR?

                   

                  If you're sending the image to Photoshop, you can just set the options the way you always want them and never think about it again. You could leave it set to ProPhoto RGB, 16 bits, native size, default resolution, sharpening off, and deal with all that later in Photoshop. This way of working is consistent with the advice you get that you shouldn't drop the quality settings in the Workflow Options.

                   

                  But if you're creating final output from Camera Raw with the Save button, then the Workflow Options become absolutely critical, because they'll determine how the new files you make will turn out. For example, if you wanted to save JPEG files from ACR that you will later drop into your web page uploader, you don't want 16-bit ProPhoto RGB files. That just won't work on a web page. And you probably don't want to upload all 20 megapixels from the camera, that would be overkill. So you open the Workflow Options and change it to 8-bit sRGB, drop the pixel dimensions, turn on sharpening optimized for the screen, and now you're ready to save the file. With Camera Raw adjustments as powerful and precise as they are now, you might sometimes take advantage of the ACR Save button to completely bypass Photoshop, and when you do that, it does become important to set the Workflow Options appropriately.

                  • 6. Re: Data at bottom of ACR screen
                    alinagum Level 1

                    Thanks to everyone for your thorough explanations.  One additional question occurs to me;

                     

                    why would one sometimes want to use 8 bits in lieu of 16?

                    • 7. Re: Data at bottom of ACR screen
                      Level 4

                      alinagum wrote:

                       

                      …why would one sometimes want to use 8 bits in lieu of 16?

                       

                      E.g.: folks who just need a JPEG for the web; folks that want the smallest possible file, for whatever reason; etc.

                      • 8. Re: Data at bottom of ACR screen
                        Noel Carboni Level 7
                        function(){return A.apply(null,[this].concat($A(arguments)))}

                        alinagum wrote:

                         

                        why would one sometimes want to use 8 bits in lieu of 16?

                         

                        Another couple of reasons:  A lot of filters in Photoshop only work on 8 bit data, and it can be a lot faster to work on 8 bit data on an underpowered computer.

                         

                        -Noel