6 Replies Latest reply on Jan 7, 2011 4:33 AM by jl2000

    Do Adobe's PSD and AE templates make PAR a no-brainer?

    jl2000 Level 1

      Hi -

       

      I've read a number of articles and Posts about PAR and I've experienced output MOVs that look great on computer monitor but blurry on a TV/DVD.  I'm aware of the differences of these monitors but something in the science or math of it just doesn't sink in.  So I'd like to run thru my plan hoping someone can correct or confirm... so I can proceed with some confidence and get it right this time.  Please be aware that because I don't know WHY I'm taking certain steps - some of my questions will seem really dumb.

       

      I have an After Effects CS3 project that will eventually output to an MOV that I will use for a DVD and YouTube (extremes of quality).

      I start with an AE template for a DV/NTSC project.  The frame size is automatically 720x480.  All the footage in this project will be stills, and most are scans of forms.  The text on the forms has to be sharp and undistorted in both output formats.

       

      Has Adobe made this a no-brainer if I religiously use the templates provided??

       

      If I start with a blank PSD  using the video/DV/NTSC template (same as the AE template), and then open the scans of the forms (JPGs) and drag them into this blank PSD, will the program take over and make any adjustments to the PAR if needed?  If I forge on and import the PSD layers into the AE file, will AE automatically work with the files to compensate for any distortion?

       

      If I click  "Pixel Aspect Ratio Correction" off or on ( in either program) does that effect the final output or is that just for my eyesight's benefit?

       

      Does anything I've said indicate that I'm understanding this... or am I way out of focus?

       

      I appreciate some expert guidance.

       

      JL

        • 1. Re: Do Adobe's PSD and AE templates make PAR a no-brainer?
          Todd_Kopriva Level 8

          Yes, you should use the appropriate composition settings preset for your output type. Don't try to overthink it. People run themselves into problems by trying to manually do things that After Effects is doing automatically.

           

           

           

          > If I click  "Pixel Aspect Ratio Correction" off or on ( in either  program) does that effect the final output or is that just for my  eyesight's benefit?

           

           

          That is just a preview option. It's a rough preview, so don't be surprised that it looks a little blocky/pixelated. It has no effect on output.

           

          > The text on the forms has to be sharp and undistorted in both output formats.

          Keep in mind that standard-definition video (720x480) is a very-low-resolution format. See this page for some tips:

          "Best practices for creating text and vector graphics for video"

           

          > that I will use for a DVD and YouTube (extremes of quality).

           

          Are you suggesting that you think that a DVD is of higher quality than what you see on YouTube? DVDs use MPEG-2 encoding and have dimensions of standard-defintion televisin---in other words, low quality. These days, online video is very often better than what you see on a standard-definition TV.

          1 person found this helpful
          • 2. Re: Do Adobe's PSD and AE templates make PAR a no-brainer?
            Szalam Adobe Community Professional & MVP

            Wow, a lot of questions and concerns. I'll handle a few of them:

             

            PAR correction in the comp window is only for your viewing purposes; it does not effect final output.

             

            DVD and YouTube are not extremes of quality. You can have 2k (or is it 4k) video on YouTube which would blow away DVD. Even the 720p on YouTube will look better than a DVD will.

            In any case, DVD video is a rather compressed MPEG format so it's not really all that high quality either.

             

            Pixel aspect ratio may not have as much to do with how good something looks on a TV vs. a computer monitor as you may think. (It certainly has to do how stretched it may or may not look.)

            An incorrect pixel aspect ration can cause some distortion (as mentioned in this page) however, the blurriness you mention may have to do with interlacing being handled incorrectly too. So, in addition to the link I mentioned earlier, you should also read this.

             

            And you should definitely read through all the tips on this page.

            1 person found this helpful
            • 3. Re: Do Adobe's PSD and AE templates make PAR a no-brainer?
              Szalam Adobe Community Professional & MVP

              Ah, I see Todd and I were typing at the same time. Again.

              • 4. Re: Do Adobe's PSD and AE templates make PAR a no-brainer?
                Todd_Kopriva Level 8

                >Ah, I see Todd and I were typing at the same time. Again.

                 

                It's good to see that we agree. That should give the original poster more confidence in the answers.

                • 5. Re: Do Adobe's PSD and AE templates make PAR a no-brainer?
                  jl2000 Level 1

                  Thank you Todd and Szalam -

                  I always thought there was a difference betw DVD/YouTube quality so I stand corrected and mystified in equal measure.

                  I think what I was referring to was the difference in the amount of trouble they are to make.  IMHO DVD's are problematic to make look correct by comparison - and this whole discussion was in the hopes of getting that right from the start.

                   

                  Thanks both for great responses.

                  Josh