17 Replies Latest reply on Jan 14, 2011 8:15 PM by Jeff Bellune

    Creating an effects preset

    davidbeisner2010 Level 3

      So, I saw in a thread somewhere recently (though I don't remember now where) that someone mentioned having created an effects preset with the motion effect to easily do the "Ken Burns" effect on a collection of still pictures to make a nice slideshow.

       

      Though I far prefer working with video, I often have to work with collections of still images, and it's horribly time consuming to apply keyframes to each picture to create that effect on a slideshow, especially when I'm working with 50+ images. I've even cheated and gone the easy route by automating them in PPT and then converting that PPT to an AVI (though I hate doing that).

       

      I'm sure I could figure it out, but wondered if someone could edumacate me on how to create that preset to automatically apply the "burns" effect to my timeline of stills?

        • 1. Re: Creating an effects preset
          tclark513 Level 3

          What I do is set the keyframes to the first photo and paste the attributes to the rest with one click.  Just highlight all the other photos at once and right click on them to paste the attributes.  Takes two seconds.

          • 2. Re: Creating an effects preset
            Colin Brougham Level 6

            Just animate an image using the desired Motion parameters--Scale, Position/Anchor Point, Rotation--with keyframes at the beginning and end of a clip. Right-click on "Motion" and click "Save Preset." Give it a descriptive name, and set the Type to "Scale"--this will force the keyframes to scale across the entire duration of the image, no matter whether it's one second or one hour. I'd do this for a few different motions--zoom in/out, pan left/right, rotate left/right. You can pretty quickly set up a nice selection of animations.

             

            One thing to keep in mind is that, if you add dissolves or transitions to the images, you will need to go in an drag the keyframes out to include the transition time--Premiere doesn't automatically scale to include that, even if the animations are applied after the transitions. That's one of the biggest things I miss from how keyframing worked in Avid--it would scale to the full duration of a clip which included the transitions. Of course, sometimes you didn't want that

             

            Another thing to note is that your presets will work best with the images that are the same size as the one where they were designed. If you have a mish-mash of image sizes, a 100% to 75% scale is going to behave differently between the images. You may still have some manual tweaking, but it will at least quickly establish a baseline for you to work from.

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            • 3. Re: Creating an effects preset
              Jim_Simon Level 8

              The problem with a preset is that you get the same motion on every still, and that's rarely what is desired.  You need to mix things up.  Scale both in and out, move up and down, left and right.  Focus on the highlight of each individual image.  Variety is the name of this game, and you can only do that by setting keyframes individually for every image.

               

              It's a pain in the ***, but that's why I charge $10 a picture to do it.

              1 person found this helpful
              • 4. Re: Creating an effects preset
                davidbeisner2010 Level 3
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                JSS1138 wrote:

                 

                The problem with a preset is that you get the same motion on every still, and that's rarely what is desired.  You need to mix things up.  Scale both in and out, move up and down, left and right.  Focus on the highlight of each individual image.  Variety is the name of this game, and you can only do that by setting keyframes individually for every image.

                 

                It's a pain in the ***, but that's why I charge $10 a picture to do it.

                 

                And that, Jim, is what I was hoping to avoid... I suppose, though, until we get some magical plugin (oh no! i used the phrase that makes you cringe!) that will do facial recognition combined with depth of field recognition, and can customize the motion effect to highlight the "important" parts of an image, we'll never be able to do it properly with a simple preset.

                 

                Perhaps I'll just create 8 presets (one for push to each of the four corners and one for pull to each of the four corners) and then just apply them at random on the less-important projects, and spend the time to do it right on the more important pieces.

                • 5. Re: Creating an effects preset
                  the_wine_snob Level 9

                  Dave,

                   

                  For me, that "magical plug-in" would need some pretty sophisticated AI (not Adobe Illustrator here), as it would have to be able to decide exactly what my intended subject was, and then create the Zoom/Pan to highlight/focus on that subject.

                   

                  Let's just take a group graduation shot, as a for instance. How would the plug-in know that my subject was the third from the right in the second row? When doing similar, long, long before digital days, and actually before Ken Burns, we had to do this for about 100 historical still images, some from the US Civil War. In some, we would Zoom and Pan to maybe a nurse in a MASH tent, administering care. In another, it would be a Pan over the carnage on the battlefield, pausing on the faces. One image was of the old hospital/nursing school building, and we Zoomed and Panned to the Catholic cross over one of the doors.

                   

                  If the subject is always shot, bullseye style, and is always in the very center of the image, things are much easier, but let us hope that they are NOT shot with that framing.

                   

                  PrE has a Random Pan & Zoom Preset, and it also will throw in Random Transitions, IIRC. Trouble is still "what is the subject of that image?" The Random Pan & Zoom might end up going to the subject's little dog, rather than the subject. That might be OK, if Spot is being featured at that point. OTOH, it might end up on the subject's foot. Is that what we really want there.

                   

                  Guess that it's because I come to Video, after many decades doing stills, but I want total, and unique control, based on MY idea of what the real subject is. Manual Keyframing gets me what I need. Now, if the Durations are the same, or close, I might well do the Copy and Paste Attributes to get the mechanics set up, but then will go, image by image, and adjust everything to suit.

                   

                  Good luck. Maybe with better speech recognition in software, we can one day let our eyes direct the Pan & Zooms, just by focusing on the subject. Just don't look across the edit suite at the cat - no telling what the software would do...

                   

                  Hunt

                  • 6. Re: Creating an effects preset
                    Colin Brougham Level 6

                    David,

                     

                    One thing you can do that might save a bit of time and frustration is to create a "naked" animation preset. No--I'm not being lewd

                     

                    Basically, create an animation preset with keyframes, but no animation. For example, turn the stop watch on for Scale, Position, and Rotation with the CTI parked at the beginning of the clip. Then, jump to the end of the clip, and set another set of keyframes for the same parameters, but don't change their values. Save this as a preset as before, with type set to Scale, but now, you can apply it to ALL of your photos at once. From there, you can quickly (or, at least, a little more quickly) change those parameters in the Program Monitor to animate the photo, without having to remember to turn on keyframing. Any parameters you don't change won't animate, obviously, so you can fairly effortlessly customize the animation for each photo.

                    • 7. Re: Creating an effects preset
                      davidbeisner2010 Level 3

                      Excellent idea, Colin... that would surely save a good bit of time! Though these have all been "correct" answers, you get the gold star for being the most helpful for my particular scenario... :-)

                      • 8. Re: Creating an effects preset
                        the_wine_snob Level 9

                        Colin,

                         

                        That is about what I do with the Copy/Paste Attributes. I will usually go ahead and adjust for image # 1, knowing that all other images will need to be adjusted - maybe that's a "semi-naked" Animation?

                         

                        Hunt

                        • 9. Re: Creating an effects preset
                          davidbeisner2010 Level 3

                          Hunt, I believe that would be referred to as a "soft-core" animation...

                          • 10. Re: Creating an effects preset
                            Jim_Simon Level 8
                            and actually before Ken Burns

                             

                            Thank You!  I hate that people call this the "Ken Burns" effect.  The technique was around probably before he was even born, certainly before he ever used it.

                            • 11. Re: Creating an effects preset
                              Colin Brougham Level 6

                              Yeah, but nobody watched documentaries before KB came around. As far as the general public is aware, documentaries didn't even exist earlier than that.

                               

                              Anyway, another reason for you to hate Apple, Jim--iMovie actually has a "Ken Burns Effect" that you can apply to a photo.

                              • 13. Re: Creating an effects preset
                                the_wine_snob Level 9

                                I have always lamented that it was not called the Bill Hunt Effect, but then it predated even me. In our case, we had to build a muli-axial stage with model RR tracks and trucks, and had all sorts of marked strings, pulleys and stuff - kind of like an Erectorset Master Collection, with a log, that the script-girl (they were called that back then) would read aloud, while everyone looked at a Graylab darkroom timer. Some setups had up to five assistants pulling strings on cue. Not pretty, not easily repeatable, but with enough practice, enough film and enough time, it all DID come together. Oh, and some intensive editing too!

                                 

                                Hunt

                                • 14. Re: Creating an effects preset
                                  Todd_Kopriva Level 8

                                  The purists among us refer to it as the Kid Stays in the Picture technique.

                                  • 15. Re: Creating an effects preset
                                    the_wine_snob Level 9

                                    Hey, works for me!

                                     

                                    Hunt, originator of the Bill Hunt Effect...

                                    • 16. Re: Creating an effects preset
                                      Jeff Bellune Adobe Community Professional

                                      The "Kid Stays In The Picture" technique refers to multi-plane animation of photographs, not just pan/zoom.

                                       

                                      -Jeff

                                      • 17. Re: Creating an effects preset
                                        Todd_Kopriva Level 8

                                        > The "Kid Stays In The Picture" technique refers to multi-plane animation of photographs, not just pan/zoom.

                                         

                                         

                                        True.