7 Replies Latest reply on Jan 24, 2011 6:53 PM by the_wine_snob

    Transferring Video Files without Losing Project Links

    julianelliott Level 1

      I know this issue must have been addressed in the archives, but I can't seem to find the specific issue.  Hope someone can help.  The online manual is no help.

       

      My C: HDD is filling up with video files, and I'd like to move all video files (and future files) to a new 2TB disk that I have installed dedicated for that purpose.  I intend to leave Premiere Elements 4.0 and my .prel projects in my existinng C: drive.

       

      How do I do this safely, without losing the links between the raw video files and clips inserted in my project??  Thanks.

        • 1. Re: Transferring Video Files without Losing Project Links
          the_wine_snob Level 9

          Welcome to the forum.

           

          All Asset files are linked to their original absolute Path, from when one last did a Save for that Project.

           

          Now, when one moves files, PrE is smart enough to ask, "Where is file ____.avi?" and then provide the user with a Finder to locate and relink those files.

           

          If you have the files in folders, I would move the full folder structure. Let PrE ask where the first file is, when you Open the Project. Point PrE to the new location, and it will then relink all Assets used in the Project, to that location. For each folder/sub-folder, just repeat for the first. When done, do a Save_As for the Project, and use that from then on.

           

          Good luck,

           

          Hunt

          • 2. Re: Transferring Video Files without Losing Project Links
            Steve Grisetti Adobe Community Professional

            Actually, you should use Premiere Elements' Project Archiver, found under the File menu.

             

            This will copy your project file as well as all of your media files to your new drive -- and keep all the links between them -- in one move. You can then delete the originals from your C drive.

             

            BTW, before you use a second drive for any kind of video storage, make sure you've formatted it as NTFS. Hard drives come from the factory FAT32, and that format has a file size limit that often chokes video editing.

            • 3. Re: Transferring Video Files without Losing Project Links
              nealeh Level 5

              Steve Grisetti wrote:

               

              This will copy your project file as well as all of your media files to your new drive

              Except, as I found to my cost, SmartSound audio files. So before deleting your original folder just take a look at the folder you archived it to and check all the files are there.

               

              Note, this was with PRE7. I've not yet used the PRE9 archiver.

               

              Cheers,
              --
              Neale
              Insanity is hereditary, you get it from your children

              • 4. Re: Transferring Video Files without Losing Project Links
                julianelliott Level 1

                Thanks, guys.  I had suspected that files could be automatically re-linked like in Photoshop, but the documentation is silent on this.

                 

                As an alternative, the Archiver seems straightforward, but I will then have my .prel project on a drive different from the Premiere program.  Somewhere I read that this is possibly unstable.  Any opinions?   Having all Premiere work (files, projects, etc.) on a dedicated drive is appealing, but I don't want to introduce issues.  Also, the interconnect is USB 2.0.  I assume the xfr speed is sufficient?  Don't want to wait for USB 3.0 to be accepted!

                • 5. Re: Transferring Video Files without Losing Project Links
                  the_wine_snob Level 9
                  the Archiver seems straightforward, but I will then have my .prel project on a drive different from the Premiere program.  Somewhere I read that this is possibly unstable.  Any opinions?

                   

                  Actually, this is preferred. On a two, physical HDD setup, allocation like this is best: Not sure where you saw a rec. to have the Project on the same drive as the program.

                   

                  C:\ OS, program files, and maybe the Windows Virtual Memory (Page File)*

                  D:\ Project, Assets and Scratch Disks

                   

                  If one has a 3 HDD I/O, this would be the best

                   

                  C:\ OS, program files, and maybe the Windows Virtual Memory (Page File)

                  D:\ Project, and Scratch Disks

                  E:\ Assets

                   

                  * A bit of experimentation might indicate that the Page File does better on another HDD, as far as ultimate performance is concerned. I have two different Page File locations, on two different machines. On one, splitting the statically managed Page File over C:\ and D:\ yielded the best performance, while on another computer, locating it fully on E:\ was best. Just depends, though locating on C:\ will usually be pretty good. For video-editing, I do like to statically manage the Page File, as is explained in this ARTICLE.

                   

                  Good luck,

                   

                  Hunt

                  • 6. Re: Transferring Video Files without Losing Project Links
                    julianelliott Level 1

                    Thanks, Bill.  I have successfully transferred the data.  All is fine.

                     

                    Still working on how to edit hours of static "new parent" video to make

                    reasonably interesting!  Have used Photoshop for years; new to Premiere.

                    Very interesting.

                     

                    Julian

                    • 7. Re: Transferring Video Files without Losing Project Links
                      the_wine_snob Level 9

                      Julian,

                       

                      That part is fun. Just think, you get to relive the moments, and then only have to Trim down to the salient points.

                       

                      Whether it's stills for a SlideShow (digital, or analog), or Video, one needs to put on the "editor's hat," and cut things down. The "cutting room floor"should be filled with footage, that is just filler. Had to do similar with a client's Project, where the parents basically turned on the vid-cam in the AM, and turned it off at bed-time, while their two daughters grew up. Hours and hours of "filler." One two hour segment was the camera running and pointing at the highchair, from which the child had been removed. You could hear the family off-camera, and finally someone said, "is that camera still running?" Hours and hours on the "cutting room floor."

                       

                      Good luck, and happy editing,

                       

                      Hunt

                       

                      PS - ever wonder why the director is seldom the editor, in a Hollywood production?