12 Replies Latest reply on Dec 6, 2011 2:13 AM by aaaef

    Comparison of SSD with hard disk drives

    Crist OC/PC Level 2

      Attribute or characteristicSolid-state driveHard disk drive
      Spin-up timeInstantaneous.May take several seconds. With a large number of drives, spin-up may need to be staggered to limit total power drawn.
      Random access time[45]About 0.1 ms - many times faster than HDDs because data is accessed directly from the flash memoryRanges from 5–10 ms due to the need to move the heads and wait for the data to rotate under the read/write head
      Read latency time[46]Generally low because the data can be read directly from any location; In applications where hard disk seeks are the limiting factor, this results in faster boot and application launch times (see Amdahl's law).[47]Generally high since the mechanical components require additional time to get aligned
      Consistent read performance[48]Read performance does not change based on where data is stored on an SSDIf data is written in a fragmented way, reading back the data will have varying response times
      DefragmentationSSDs do not benefit from defragmentation because there is little benefit to reading data sequentially and any defragmentation process adds additional writes on the NAND flash that already have a limited cycle life.[49][50]HDDs may require defragmentation after continued operations or erasing and writing data, especially involving large files or where the disk space becomes low. [51]
      Acoustic levelsSSDs have no moving parts and make no soundHDDs have moving parts (heads, spindle motor) and have varying levels of sound depending upon model
      Mechanical reliabilityA lack of moving parts virtually eliminates mechanical breakdownsHDDs have many moving parts that are all subject to failure over time
      Susceptibility toenvironmental factors[47][52][53]No flying heads or rotating platters to fail as a result of shock, altitude, or vibrationThe flying heads and rotating platters are generally susceptible to shock, altitude, and vibration
      Magneticsusceptibility[citation needed]No impact on flash memoryMagnets or magnetic surges can alter data on the media
      Weight and size[52]The weight of flash memory and the circuit board material are very light compared to HDDsHigher performing HDDs require heavier components than laptop HDDs that are light, but not as light as SSDs
      Parallel operation[citation needed]Some flash controllers can have multiple flash chips reading and writing different data simultaneouslyHDDs have multiple heads (one per platter) but they are connected, and share one positioning motor.
      Write longevitySolid state drives that use flash memory have a limited number of writes over the life of the drive.[54][55][56][57] SSDs based on DRAM do not have a limited number of writes.Magnetic media do not have a limited number of writes.
      Software encryption limitationsNAND flash memory cannot be overwritten, but has to be rewritten to previously erased blocks. If a software encryption program encrypts data already on the SSD, the overwritten data is still unsecured, unencrypted, and accessible (drive-based hardware encryption does not have this problem). Also data cannot be securely erased by overwriting the original file without special "Secure Erase" procedures built into the drive.[58]HDDs can overwrite data directly on the drive in any particular sector.
      CostAs of October 2010, NAND flash SSDs cost about (US)$1.40–2.00 per GBAs of October 2010, HDDs cost about (US)$0.10/GB for 3.5 in and $0.20/GB for 2.5 in drives
      Storage capacityAs of October 2010, SSDs come in different sizes up to 2TB but are typically 512GB or less[59]As of October 2010, HDDs are typically 2-3TB or less
      Read/write performance symmetryLess expensive SSDs typically have write speeds significantly lower than their read speeds. Higher performing SSDs and those from particular manufacturers have a balanced read and write speed.[citation needed]HDDs generally have symmetrical read and write speeds
      Free block availability andTRIMSSD write performance is significantly impacted by the availability of free, programmable blocks. Previously written data blocks that are no longer in use can be reclaimed by TRIM; however, even with TRIM, fewer free, programmable blocks translates into reduced performance.[25][60][61]HDDs are not affected by free blocks or the operation (or lack) of the TRIM command
      Power consumptionHigh performance flash-based SSDs generally require 1/2 to 1/3 the power of HDDs; High performance DRAM SSDs generally require as much power as HDDs and consume power when the rest of the system is shut down.[62][63]High performance HDDs generally require between 12-18 watts; drives designed for notebook computers are typically 2 watts.

        • 1. Re: Comparison of SSD with hard disk drives
          Crist OC/PC Level 2

          I like to apply this comparation with a radi0 10.000 RPM and a RAID30 Areca ARC-1880ix-16.

          • 2. Re: Comparison of SSD with hard disk drives
            Harm Millaard Level 7

            Bill Gehrke has tested both 8 x SSD's and 8 x conventional disks in Raid0 with an Areca ARC-1680 controller and did not find any measurable performance difference.

             

            For a boot disk, the 'speed' of SSD's is a moot point, because the bulk of the boot time is in POST, initializing raid controller chips, loading raid BIOS, spinnig up conventional disks, so instead of a boot time of say 70 seconds, it may be reduced to 65 seconds once a day and IMO that does not justify the price difference.

             

            Once PR is running, there is no advantage in having a OS SSD over conventional disks. For storage they are way too pricey.

             

            Example: my storage capacity with conventional disks cost € 1,800. Getting the same capacity with SSD's costs € 34,000. Price level per February 2011 and including raid controller(s). Alternatively for € 1,800 I can get 16 TB conventional storage, or 2 x 256 GB SSD's with the same raid controller.

            1 person found this helpful
            • 3. Re: Comparison of SSD with hard disk drives
              Crist OC/PC Level 2

              What about exporting and Importing Data in ME. Will the SSD Random access  and Read latency make a difference ???? In cases we use it for Proyect, renders and previews.??

               

               

              How can we determine the amount of data transported on a M.B. with a proccesor running @ "X" ghz .

               

              So for examp: 1 Intel core 2quad @ 4.5 GHZ makkin 100% operation  mathematical logics ( like in render or exporting) will transport 1000mbs/s.

               

              Is this possible to be determined???

               

              I hoppe some one can cacht my idea.

               

              THX VRM

              • 4. Re: Comparison of SSD with hard disk drives
                Harm Millaard Level 7

                Cristobal,

                 

                Today's prices here for conventional hard disks are less than € 0.05/GB, for SSD's around € 1.72/GB, a factor 37 x more expensive per GB.

                • 5. Re: Comparison of SSD with hard disk drives
                  Crist OC/PC Level 2

                  I agree 100% with you. Im talking about performance. and Data Transport between HDD->RAM->CPU->RAM->HDD

                  • 6. Re: Comparison of SSD with hard disk drives
                    eraim2

                    Hello All

                     

                    As usual, Harm's info are of great value.

                    I'm far from being a computer guru like most of those on this thread. Hence my question may look obvious but I still dare to ask

                    Despite Harm's previous advices, I had to work with a laptop (just spend 2 months in Cambodia, shooting and couldn't afford being w/o my editing sw). Here is what I have:

                    Clevo                       W860CU- Intel® i7-620M 2.6GHz to3.33GHz - 4 MB cache

                    RAM -  8GB SO-DIMM RAM DDR-3 /                       1333 MHz (2x4GB)

                    HDD 500GB/7200 + 4GB SSD

                    nVidia GTX 285M 1Go

                    e-Sata1TB/ 7200

                    SSD 32GB

                    W7 64b & CS4

                     

                    Yes Harm, pretty heavy!

                     

                    Question: how do I spread OS, Programs, Media, renders... I understand from this thread that pagefile can't be put on SSD - am I right? How do I best use it?

                    I have only one e-Sata connector: should I go for a dual e-Sata?

                    I sized pagefile to 12 GB as adviced, on C/ - should I put it on e-Sata (if possible)? Then, it's not a portable anymore unless I change pagefile each time I want to travel with my laptop. Afterall, why not.

                     

                    Eraim

                    • 7. Re: Comparison of SSD with hard disk drives
                      Harm Millaard Level 7

                      Eraim,

                       

                      You can put the pagefile on an SSD, if it supports the trim function. Otherwise the major drawback of SSD's, the deteriorating write performance after using it for some time becomes obvious. If the trim function is not supported it makes more sense to put the pagefile on your 500 GB internal, leaving you independent of an eSATA connection.

                       

                      BTW, how do you like the Clevo? Probably very nice, I guess.

                      • 8. Re: Comparison of SSD with hard disk drives
                        eraim2 Level 1
                        Harm,

                        Gee, when do you sleep?

                        I'm trying to figure out about the trim function. Doesn't show up     anywhere on the doc. Waiting from Transcend to answer the question.     But still, it doesn't show up on the Windows device list where you     could change the location (I thought it was bebcause it came FAT32     but it's the same after converted to NTFS).

                        Clevo is fine but... the wifi card seems to start having problem     after one month; I have to deactivate/reactivate it after boot quite     too often.  The rest mostly concerns the French distributor:     Anyware. I received the SSD card, ordered with the laptop, 3 months     later. Never received Linux that they were supposed to install with     W7 in dual boot (that's something I can't do, really troublesome).

                        The bottom line is that I'd recommend it: it's really a good price     performance - about 20% less than Dell. And I'm happy with my     config.

                        Thanks for your tips

                        Le 05/02/2011 11:39, Harm Millaard a écrit :
                        Eraim,

                        You can put the pagefile on an SSD, if it supports the trim function. Otherwise the major drawback of SSD's, the deteriorating write performance after using it for some time becomes obvious. If the trim function is not supported it makes more sense to put the pagefile on your 500 GB internal, leaving you independent of an eSATA connection.

                        BTW, how do you like the Clevo? Probably very nice, I guess.

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                        • 9. Re: Comparison of SSD with hard disk drives

                          wowowl, it's good writing on compare it, sure, SSD time is coming! it's time to replace HDD by SSD, while SSD price a little high now. recently, my lots of friends recommend me the China brand Renice SSD by www.b2cit.com, they directly offer Renice SSD, they are in China to keep good relationship with Renice Tech manufactory, give me more confidence  for Renice SSD from www.b2cit.com , check more detail for your reference,

                           

                          BTW, renice SSD use standforce controler, it competitve with Intel!

                          • 10. Re: Comparison of SSD with hard disk drives
                            Crist OC/PC Level 2

                            Renice Performance:

                            - Max Read Rate: 113MB/sec

                            - Max Write Rate: 75MB/sec

                            - 4kb Random Read IOPS: 53,00

                            - Access Time: 0.1ms

                             

                            Mine W.D. velociraptor is doing much better ... ". PLEASE THIS IS A SERIUS FORUM. Don´t come whit all this crap if you don know the forum...

                            • 11. Re: Comparison of SSD with hard disk drives
                              Trevor.Dennis Adobe Community Professional (Moderator)

                              I wish I could get my head round the SSD vs HDD with a NLE rig.  My builder is trying to persuade me to use a Toshiba 256Gb THNSNC256GBSJ for OS and programs, and it is only NZ$20 more expensive than the 450Gb 10k rpm VelociRaptor I was originally planing to use for the OS.  That sounds suspiciously cheap to me, and I am concerned about the finite writes to SSD - mainly because I don't really understand it.  

                               

                              The rest of the new build is

                               

                              3930K

                              Gigabyte X79-UD5

                              8 x DDR3 1600

                              Coolermaster with 750W PSU

                              Geforce GTX570

                               

                              I plan to transfer the drives from my current system as a starting point, and reassess after giving it some use.  That means

                               

                              Either the above SSD or 450Gb 10k Raptor for OS (new drives)

                              300Gb 10k rpm Raptor  (currently used for OS in old box)

                              150Gb 7k4 rpm Raptor (reserved for Photoshop Scratch in old box)

                              2 x 1Tb WD Blacks (data drives)

                              2 x 1Tb WD USB3 externals

                               

                              I don't know how I would configure the drives in the new box, but have seen Harm's table and will try to follow his advice.  It's a dreadful thing to admit, but I don't have a backup strategy, and the above drives are well over half full. Well over!  And I am only just getting serious about video, (the rest is mainly CR2 files from my Canon 1Ds3 and 1D4)

                               

                              I know it must be like banging your head against the wall, but should I avoid that SSD and go with the 450G Raptor?   I have read a comment that the WD Blacks don't work well as Raid0.  Is that BS or true?

                               

                              I am about to give the go-ahead so need to confirm the spec.

                               

                               

                              • 12. Re: Comparison of SSD with hard disk drives
                                Level 1

                                In IT field, SSD replace HDD is the trend, SSD has more advantage than HDD, just now the Tech limitted, the price is higher, while belive it will become more popular with Tech development,  i only can see you just choose what you need right for you now, right is the best!, dear buddy! make your own decision by self and believe you are right!