7 Replies Latest reply on Feb 21, 2011 12:51 PM by the_wine_snob

    Relating audio to video

    kdoc2 Level 1

      I have the video set now (stills and video on Video 1), and I've dictated a voiceover separately as a wav file and placed it onto Audio 1.. But they aren't coordinated. I need to make spaces between sentences or groups of sentences so that they come at the appropriate time. What's the best way to do this?

      1. I could make razor cuts and slide the audio appropriately--if so, what's the keystroke or way to select all from the CTI on?

      2. I could add space in soundboth, but I can't see the video in soundbooth.

      3. I tried to export the Pr sequence into an M4V and M2V so that I'd have both audio and video in soundbooth, but when I then open that in Soundbooth the audio only shows up as a straight line (I'm not sure what settings to use for that export). And even if I could export it from Pr and then open as a Soundbooth, how would I get it back into Premier for further editing?

       

      There must be a good way to do this, but I haven't figured it out.

       

      kdoc

        • 1. Re: Relating audio to video
          Jim_Simon Level 8

          1. is probably the easiest way.  The Help file has the appropriate information on the operation of Premiere Pro.

          • 2. Re: Relating audio to video
            T-Craft Level 1

            1. I could make razor cuts and slide the audio appropriately--if so, what's the keystroke or way to select all from the CTI on?



            Track Selection Tool
            Select this tool to select all the clips to the right of the cursor in a sequence. To select a clip and all clips to the right in its own track, click the clip. To select a clip and all clips to its right in all tracks, Shift-click the clip. Pressing Shift changes the Track Selection Tool into the Multi-track Selection Tool. For more information about using the Track Selection Tool



            here is the link to the help page that explains it in more detail:

            http://help.adobe.com/en_US/premierepro/cs/using/WS1c9bc5c2e465a58a91cf0b1038518aef7-7d0ca .html


            "G" is the keyboard shortcut for the track selection tool.

            hope this helps!

            T-Craft
            • 3. Re: Relating audio to video
              kdoc2 Level 1

              Thanks folks. While waiting for a response I tried this: I exported to an MP4 which does show up the audio and video in Soundbooth. I could now edit in Soundbooth. I don't think the Wav file was  degraded, and that's the only part I'll keep--I'll use the original Video on Track 1 (Was it compressed at all--the properties still say 4800 and 16 bit WAV)  Do you see anything wrong with this approach as an alternative to #1 which you're both recommending? While I've already in this case, edited the audio, this could be a way to both edit the audio more completely and  easily (in Soundbooth) at the same time one is setting the timing. Then I would save the Wav file only, and substitute it in Audio 1 in Pr. What do you think? (In this particular case I'm working on, though, I think I'll do what you suggest).

               

              kdoc

              • 4. Re: Relating audio to video
                Colin Brougham Level 6

                I think you've got a pretty convoluted workflow going on here The whole point of a non-linear editor (or any video editor, for that matter) is synchronizing picture with sound. Premiere will do everything you need without exporting to another application.

                 

                Beyond the methods mentioned already, probably the most efficient is this:

                 

                1. Load your audio clip into the Source Monitor; just double-click it in the bin/Project Panel.
                2. If it's an audio only clip, you'll already see a waveform; if it's an AV clip, click the Output button (RGB circles) and set it to Audio Waveform.
                3. In the timeline panel, make sure the Source Track indicator is in line with your desired Target Track; make sure that only the Target Track you want is selected/lit up.
                4. Mark an in point (I) and an outpoint (O) around the section of audio you want in the Source Monitor.
                5. Move the CTI in the sequence to the point where you need the audio to start.
                6. Use the keyboard shortcut (can't remember what the default is) or click the button for Overlay Edit (in the Source Monitor panel). The marked section of audio will be added to your sequence at the CTI.

                 

                Repeat steps 4-6 until you've edited all your audio into the sequence. This might sound like a few steps, but it takes longer to read than to do. I think you will find this is far faster than the external application workflow you're trying, or even faster than shoving around the audio clip in a sequence. You'll also have a finer degree of control.

                1 person found this helpful
                • 5. Re: Relating audio to video
                  kdoc2 Level 1

                  Sounds terrific. Can't wait to try it later today. Thanks. (I had  a feeling there  must be a simpler way, but couldn't come up with it). Maybe we should have some good audio videos put up on Facebook/Premiere.

                   

                  Let me ask a followup question. Is  it felt that using the Audio Mixer set to "Write" initially is the best way to control the volumes on Audio 1, then 2 and 3? That seems better than placing keyframes on the volume line on the timeline or in the Effects panel. And if you do recommend this, I've set "minimum time" in Preferences/Audio to 200 or 300 msec. What do you use. If left at default, an awful lot of keyframes show up

                   

                  kdoc

                  • 6. Re: Relating audio to video
                    Colin Brougham Level 6
                    Maybe we should have some good audio videos put up on Facebook/Premiere.

                     

                    Stay tuned...

                     

                    Is  it felt that using the Audio Mixer set to "Write" initially is the best way to control the volumes on Audio 1, then 2 and 3?

                     

                    I'm going to plead the fifth on this one, because frankly, I don't use the Audio Mixer that much. I'll defer to others more educated in this area. I would suggest perhaps starting a new thread with this particular topic as the focus; as this thread has been marked Answered now, it will likely get fewer eyes. Not sure if you'll get any stimulating discussion out of it, but it's always a good bet to dangle a fresh worm

                    • 7. Re: Relating audio to video
                      the_wine_snob Level 9

                      Ah, even without that "fresh worm," I'll take the bait...

                       

                      I use the Audio Mixer often, and like the automation that it will provide. I do find the default Track Keyframe frequency a bit too much, so tweak that down in Edit.Preferences.

                       

                      I use Write, or Touch for my Sends. They are similar, but with some important differences, mainly with how the Send behaves, when you let go of the slider. Experiment with each, and also read up on each in the Help File. Each has a purpose.

                       

                      Good luck,

                       

                      Hunt

                       

                      PS - I also feel that Renaming my Audio (and my Video) Tracks is very useful, especially when dealing with Audio Mixer. I like knowing exactly which Track I am dealing with, and trying to remember what's on Audio 1, Audio 2, etc., can get confusing. I'll name the Tracks in ways that make sense to me, say "AV Audio 1," "SFX 1," "Music Front," etc. Then, there's no question in my mind. With a ton of SFX Tracks, I might take it a step farther, with "Loon in Distance," "Loon Near," and so on. I guess that the "early Loon gets the worm... "