3 Replies Latest reply on Feb 22, 2011 7:09 AM by Ed Edited It Productions

    CS5 Source Window Timecode Doesn't Match Source Tape

    Ed Edited It Productions

      Hi-

       

      I'm editing a 720/30P HDV project - and after digitizing 7 hours of footage via firewire from a JVC GY-HD100 - I discovered EVERY clip's timecode begins at 08:06:11:05 - and I'm not sure why. In Edit > Preferences > Capture, I have "Use device control timecode" checked, and under Edit > Preferences > Media, I have Timecode: "Use Media Source" selected, along with "Write XMP ID to Files on Import" and "Enable Clip and XMP Metadata Linking" selected. Have I set this up incorrectly? Is there a way to get back the original timecode without re-digizing all 7 hours? Also, I can't seem to batch capture - no matter how much heads/tails I establish - CS5 never actually starts "capturing". Manually recording works - and I have full control of the device - and CS5 shows the correct timecode as well during capture. Thanks in advance!

        • 1. Re: CS5 Source Window Timecode Doesn't Match Source Tape
          Colin Brougham Level 6

          I discovered EVERY clip's timecode begins at 08:06:11:05 - and I'm not sure why. In Edit > Preferences > Capture, I have "Use device control timecode" checked, and under Edit > Preferences > Media,

           

          Unfortunately, I think this is why; the "Use Device Control Timecode" option shouldn't be used if you actually DO have timecode on your tape. That would be used if the deck was generating the timecode, not just reading it off the tape.

           

          From the help docs:

          If you are using a device controller that generates its own timecode, select Use Device Control Timecode. Use Device Control Timecode replaces the unreadable timecode recorded on the tape with the controller’s timecode.

           

          What probably happened is that the camera's TCG was set or left at a certain value (the start TC you mentioned above), which Premiere read and then generated new TC from that point forward on each capture. The camera was set to record run, not free run, so it was always spitting out the same value from the internal TCG. Due to that setting, Premiere assumed that to be the TC of the incoming media, and recorded it as such. Disabling that option would have (or should have) actually read the TC as recorded on tape.

           

          I had something similar happen to me with my HVX200 which I had coupled to my laptop and OnLocation. I forgot to set my camera TCG to free run, so every file I captured (400 of them for almost 5 hours!) started with the same TC. That's why I suspect this to be the problem you've encountered. It's also why you're not able to batch capture; you can control the device, but the camera can't find the timecode you've given it via Premiere.

           

          You can alter the timecode of a file by right-clicking on it, and selecting Modify > Timecode. If you can match up the first frame of your capture to the corresponding frame of your source material (maybe capture a few seconds at the beginning of each tape with the "Use Device Control Timecode" option disabled), you should be able to reset the timecode. Of course, if your captures are in smaller pieces, this could get monotonous, and I'd just suggest recapturing.

           

          Hope that helps!

          • 2. Re: CS5 Source Window Timecode Doesn't Match Source Tape
            Jim_Simon Level 8
            The camera was set to record run, not free run, so it was always spitting out the same value from the internal TCG.

             

            Huh?  Set to either Rec Run or Free Run, the TC value on tape would have been different for every clip.

            • 3. Re: CS5 Source Window Timecode Doesn't Match Source Tape
              Ed Edited It Productions Level 1

              Thanks! that sounds logical - although I can't try it now to confirm as I had to return the camera. I wish the timecode shown in the digitizing window would have matched though, that would make sense. During capture, I did confirm the correct timecode in the digitizing window - which was displayed correctly during capture - but didn't think to go back and check the clip itself.