3 Replies Latest reply on Jun 22, 2007 1:19 AM by Newsgroup_User

    Working with voiceovers

    rafa@mediatech Level 1
      Hi:
      I am currently building a tutorial on how to use a software created by the client. The only way I know to do this, is to extend the voiceover sprite whatever lenght it is in frames and animate the other sprites in the correct frame of the time line. Now this takes forever since I have to start the voice sprite from the beggining every single time. Is there a smarter and more efficient way to work with voiceovers in director? Curently, with all the voiceover sprites in the timeline, I am up to frame 39,000. If you know any tutorial that can help me with this, please let me know.

      Thank you.
        • 1. Re: Working with voiceovers
          Level 7
          "rafa@mediatech" wrote:

          > The only way I know to do this, is to extend the voiceover sprite
          > whatever lenght it is in frames and animate the other sprites in the correct
          > frame of the time line.

          Hi,

          Yes, that is not the best way. Before I give the answer, just some explanation.
          Director is frame based. Sound is time based. This means that Director will play
          every frame of your movie and may veer off your set frame rate. Time based media
          always plays to a fixed time.

          As an example, say we have a 2 second animation playing at 15 frames per second -
          so 30 frames. Say this exists as a Director movie (frame based) and a QuickTime
          digital video (time based). Now I play both on a computer that has a very bad CPU
          that can only manage 10 fps. My Director movie will still play all 30 frames, so
          my 2 second anim now takes 3 seconds. My QT on the other hand behaves differently.
          Instead of playing every frame, it will drop frames, so will only play 10 of each
          15 frame group. So, retains the time of 2 seconds.

          Your ears are more sensitive to your eyes. Dropped frames may be OK but dropped
          bits of sound would be disturbing. So when playing sound in Director, the
          computing resources are optimised to play that at its right speed without
          compromising.

          So, now we know Directors frame playback and time based media work on different
          systems, you can see that using the Score to synchronise sound to animation will
          be difficult and may vary from one computer to another. The best thing to do is
          make the animation shorter than the sound and let it wait at key points for the
          sound to 'catch up' with the anim. That way, you have a buffer for slower
          computers.

          So, now to your project. If you have sounds perhaps over 30 seconds long with
          different points within the sound to match to something on the screen, I's say use
          Cue Points. I have a tutorial on this at:
          http://www.fbe.unsw.edu.au/learning/Director/sound&inter/tut6.asp
          This one uses the Temp channel to create 'wait for cue point' but you can use
          Lingo instead. But, it should give you a start.

          Hope that helps.

          regards
          Dean

          Director Lecturer / Consultant / Director Enthusiast
          http://www.fbe.unsw.edu.au/learning/director
          http://www.multimediacreative.com.au
          email: d.utian@unsw.edu.au


          • 2. Re: Working with voiceovers
            rafa@mediatech Level 1
            Dean:
            Thank you for your comments. I tried the tutorial you suggested and it works fine. Now I just have to apply it to my project.

            Question, on the tutorial they mention a format called .pct. I have Adobe Audition 2.0, and I dont see that format as part of my "save as" options. Is this format recognize as something else?

            Again, thank you

            Rafael.
            • 3. Re: Working with voiceovers
              Level 7
              "rafa@mediatech" wrote:

              > Question, on the tutorial they mention a format called .pct. I have Adobe
              > Audition 2.0, and I dont see that format as part of my "save as" options. Is
              > this format recognize as something else?

              Hi Raphael,

              The pct file is an image. At the start, it says download JuliaRoberts.pct. Right
              click that link and save and that will give you the file I'm referring to. The
              wav file is what you'd use in Adobe Audition to add cue points.

              Feel free to email me directly if you have any other questions regarding the
              tutorials.

              regards
              Dean

              Director Lecturer / Consultant / Director Enthusiast
              http://www.fbe.unsw.edu.au/learning/director
              http://www.multimediacreative.com.au
              email: d.utian@unsw.edu.au