3 Replies Latest reply on Mar 25, 2011 8:36 PM by Colin Brougham

    Best format for CS5 from JVC HM700: .mov or .mp4

    nantoskey Level 1

      Is one choice better than the other for editing in CS5?

        • 1. Re: Best format for CS5 from JVC HM700: .mov or .mp4
          Colin Brougham Level 6

          They both work. Using MOV lets you use the files easily in FCP (if you need that workflow). The MP4s will playback on the desktop (Windows) with something like Media Player Classic Home Cinema or VLC; VLC and will play the MOVs. From Premiere's standpoint, though, there is no difference.

          • 2. Re: Best format for CS5 from JVC HM700: .mov or .mp4
            Jim_Simon Level 8

            The MOV files will require QuickTime be installed.  The MP4 files will not.

             

            I don't have (or want) QuickTime installed, as there have been occasional issues with such, so I'd go with the MP4s myself.

             

            QuickTime is also still a 32 bit process only, so PP needs to use an abstraction layer for those files that the MP4s will not require.  Using the KISS principle, this also makes the MP4s more desirable.

            • 3. Re: Best format for CS5 from JVC HM700: .mov or .mp4
              Colin Brougham Level 6

              The MOV files will require QuickTime be installed.  The MP4 files will not.

               

              False, at least in the case of MOVs from the JVC. Premiere will open them without QuickTime installed.

               

              QuickTime is also still a 32 bit process only, so PP needs to use an abstraction layer for those files that the MP4s will not require.

               

              True, but again, not in the case of these MOVs. Premiere natively supports (e.g. 64-bit) decoding of a number of QuickTime files. The HM700 files are among those, but also included are DV, DVCPRO50, DVCPROHD, and H.264. QuickTime does not need to be installed to decode these, and the process is not 32-bit. For other codecs for which there is not already built-in native decoding, like Avid DNxHD or Apple ProRes, QuickTime would have to be installed and at that point the 32-bit QuickTime process comes into play.

               

              As far as Premiere is concerned, there is little if any difference between the MP4s and the MOVs. The MOVs are probably better suited for cross-platforming, if this is a workflow concern, and actually are tidier to use: unlike the MP4s which reside in an XDCAM-EX folder structure, the MOVs are saved in a flat folder.