4 Replies Latest reply on Apr 6, 2011 12:03 PM by Yammer

    Cropping corrected photos without using Scale?

    Yammer Level 4

      I'm not sure if I'm doing this right, or there's a potential problem with ACR...

       

      Take a wide angle raw photo with converging or diverging verticals, and apply a lens correction profile, then turn on the grid and straighten up the verticals, possibly applying a bit of Rotate while you're at it. Done? Right.

       

      You'll notice that you may have lost quite a bit off the top or bottom of the image, depending on which way and how much you moved the sliders. To get it back again, I've been using Scale to shrink the image until I can see the image edge. A side effect of using Scale is that the opposite edge is now quite a way inside the canvas, and the processed image will have lost a lot of its original resolution.

       

      Ideally, I'd like to be able to grab the image and centre it in the canvas, or hope ACR did this for me, so I don't need to shrink to see all edges. Am I missing something, or is this a 'feature' of Lens Correction?

        • 1. Re: Cropping corrected photos without using Scale?
          Jeff Schewe Level 5

          You have two options, either live with the reduced image area because of the image distortion corrections or have the crop tool option "Constrain to Image" selected in the Crop tool drop down menu. If you plan on filling in the blank areas using Content Aware Fill, you'll prolly want the Constrain option off.

          1 person found this helpful
          • 2. Re: Cropping corrected photos without using Scale?
            Yammer Level 4

            I'm not sure if that second option helps.

             

            What I'm seeing, is that the more you correct the verticals, the more the image slides out of the top of the frame. Now this wouldn't be a problem if it was just blank sky, for example, but if there is wanted detail near the top of the image, it will have disappeared out of the top of the ACR 'canvas'. At the same time, the bottom of the image is pulled up, leaving lots of grey canvas exposed.

             

            Ideally, the canvas border could be moved up, to expose the whole of the warped image, but it isn't. Instead, as far as I know, the only way to get it all back into the frame is to shrink it, which seems a bit of shame.

             

            I don't understand how constraining a crop to the image edge will help recover the lost bits, or maybe that's not what you're saying?

            • 3. Re: Cropping corrected photos without using Scale?
              Jeff Schewe Level 5

              Yammer P wrote:

               

              Ideally, the canvas border could be moved up, to expose the whole of the warped image, but it isn't. Instead, as far as I know, the only way to get it all back into the frame is to shrink it, which seems a bit of shame.

               

              I agree it would be useful to have a vertical and horizontal shift to recenter after the transform corrections. But as it stands, your only option is to scale down. You might try increasing the Workflow Options size to resample up. Not optimal but at least you would end up making the best use of the original pixels...

              • 4. Re: Cropping corrected photos without using Scale?
                Yammer Level 4

                Yes, except I'm already one step up from the default!

                 

                I submit many of my shots for stock, and I've always upsized my 12MP images by one step (43%) using ACR quite successfully. Fortunately, they've dropped their minimum requirements from 16MP to 8MP, so any seriously cropped images will now make the grade (but not necessarily the top shelf).

                 

                I wonder what the interpolation implications of a 2-step increase would be, considering that much of the image has already been downsized by the vertical distortion adjustment. Would the accuracy be maintained, or would detail be lost in the compression phase?

                 

                That's a rhetorical question, by the way, but please feel free to respond if you know the answer!