8 Replies Latest reply on Apr 14, 2011 8:36 AM by ryan_khoo

    How to bring footage into Premiere Pro shot from AVCHD video camera ?

    ryan_khoo Level 1

      Hi all experts out there,

       

      I have bought a Canon video camera which records in AVCHD format on a SD card.

       

      My Mac computer has a SD card reader.

       

      Question is, how to I import the footage captured on the SD card into premiere pro ?

       

      Thanks

        • 1. Re: How to bring footage into Premiere Pro shot from AVCHD video camera ?
          Colin Brougham Level 6

          Copy the entire SD card (including the folders) to your hard drive, and then use the Media Browser to navigate into the folder structure; once you open the PRIVATE folder with MB, all the clips will be revealed and you can drag them into your project.

          • 2. Re: How to bring footage into Premiere Pro shot from AVCHD video camera ?
            ryan_khoo Level 1

            Thanks Colin,

             

            But will I be able to set the In & Out point before bringing in to Premiere Pro ?

             

            Thanks again

            • 3. Re: How to bring footage into Premiere Pro shot from AVCHD video camera ?
              Colin Brougham Level 6

              If you double-click a clip in the Media Browser, it will be loaded into the Source Monitor without being imported into the project. You can mark it as you like, and then drag it into the Project Panel or into a sequence (and then it will also be added to the Project Panel). However, note that this doesn't actually trim away any content from the original video file; they are simply virtual markers on the original media. If you "physically" want to shorten your media, you'd have to do that in an external application before importing into Premiere.

              1 person found this helpful
              • 4. Re: How to bring footage into Premiere Pro shot from AVCHD video camera ?
                ryan_khoo Level 1

                Thanks Colin,

                 

                But I still need to copy the whole SD card into the harddisk to be able to browse in the Media Browser ?

                 

                Would I be able to use Media Browser to browse & select in & out point in the source monitor & then drag to the project panel ? (My purpose is to save harddisk space).

                 

                Thanks again ...

                • 5. Re: How to bring footage into Premiere Pro shot from AVCHD video camera ?
                  Colin Brougham Level 6

                  But I still need to copy the whole SD card into the harddisk to be able to browse in the Media Browser ?

                   

                  No, you can technically edit off the SD card, but you probably don't want to You don't have to keep the folder structure, either, but you'll lose metadata, e.g. timecode, if you don't. Premiere is fine with just the MTS files.

                   

                  Would I be able to use Media Browser to browse & select in & out point in the source monitor & then drag to the project panel ? (My purpose is to save harddisk space).

                   

                  Sounds like you're a reformed FCP user? Premiere doesn't work the same was as FCP, since it doesn't transcode to a different format on import with the Log and Transfer window. This means that you have to trim the files down externally first, before importing into Premiere, if you want smaller files to begin with. I'm not sure what application to look into for this purpose, but you might try Googling for an "AVCHD editor."

                  1 person found this helpful
                  • 6. Re: How to bring footage into Premiere Pro shot from AVCHD video camera ?
                    rickg1949 Level 1

                    I'm using a Panasonic AG-AF100 now and was a bit perplexed with how to manag

                    e AVCHD material myself.  In order to maintain the original timecode, I had to copy

                    the entire SD card folder as mentioned above to a distinct folder on my RAID.  But that

                    would have given me lots of .MTS files with the same file name (like 00012.MTS) and

                    since I often create projects from archived material, I decided to just rip the .MTS files

                    from each card and use Bridge to rename them according to subject.  Timecode then

                    started at 00:00.00 for each clip, but that was not a hastle and being able to identify

                    clips by name over multiple projects works for me.

                     

                    File based editing is a new world and I am filling up the RAID's rapidly.

                     

                    Rick

                    • 7. Re: How to bring footage into Premiere Pro shot from AVCHD video camera ?
                      Colin Brougham Level 6

                      Rick,

                       

                      I've just started working with AF100 footage, too--mostly b-roll and stuff that doesn't need TC at this point. Since I'm the primary editor, I wanted something a little easier to work with than the AVCHD structure, and what was even more important was the ability to add metadata to the files so that they could be logged in one program and the metadata would stick. Unfortunately, MTS files don't work for this...

                       

                      The workflow I've started is to use a simple FFmpeg batch script to losslessly rewrap the MTS streams into an MP4 container. I batch rename the files using Bridge or my favorite rename utility. I can then use MPEG StreamClip to trim the files into smaller pieces and throw away the chaff (again, lossless), and the MP4s will preview in Bridge--even though I hate Bridge and try to avoid it. Best of all, the MP4 container is able to have metadata injected into it, so I can log the files in Bridge or Premiere, and then that metadata lives with the MP4--not just the project, as it would with MTS files.

                       

                      Brave new world, indeed...