10 Replies Latest reply on Apr 20, 2011 5:05 PM by the_wine_snob

    .Mts and .Mpeg

    webster_1c

      Hi all

       

      I have to different video clips, one is a .mts file 1920 by 1080 and the other is a MPEG file 720 x 576 both are running at 25pfs. I need to edit them and then export them so they look the same. However, not sure how best to go about this, there are so many settings. At the moment when i export the .mts file has black bars across the top and bottom and the mpeg file has a big black area around the whole piece... can anybody help advise how i get these clips to look the same when exported? Should i convert the .mts file to an mpeg ?

        • 1. Re: .Mts and .Mpeg
          Colin Brougham Level 6

          It's has little, if anything, to do with the format of the clips, and is more an issue of the different frame sizes. What do you intend to do with the finished video? Web? DVD? Bluray?

           

          Your destination is the most important determining factor of the sequence you want to use.

           

          Also, bear in mind that is best to decrease the size of a clip rather than increase it, for reasons that should be obvious.

          • 2. Re: .Mts and .Mpeg
            the_wine_snob Level 9

            First, a couple of questions:

             

            1. When you say "look the same," exactly what do you mean? You will never get the SD material to "look the same" as the SD material.
            2. What is your final delivery scheme, SD or HD?

             

            For #1, you can get them to fill the Frame in several ways. You can up-rez the SD with a program/plug-in, like Red Giant's Magic Bullet Instant HD, but it will never look as good, as the HD material. Conversely, you can down-rez the HD material to SD, and I'd recommend Jeff Bellune's TUTORIAL on doing that. If you ONLY mean fill the Frame the same, then you could choose an HD Sequence, and Scale up and effectively crop the SD material. Or, you could Scale down the HD material, and perhaps effectively crop it, if your SD material is not Widescreen.

             

            # 2 will help define which of those methods would work best.

             

            Good luck,

             

            Hunt

            • 3. Re: .Mts and .Mpeg
              webster_1c Level 1

              Hi Colin

               

              Both need to be played on a website, so should i make the make the .MTS file which is bigger the same size as the .MPG clip ?

              • 4. Re: .Mts and .Mpeg
                the_wine_snob Level 9

                For Web playback, then I would definitely downscale the HD material.

                 

                Is your SD material Standard, or Widescreen?

                 

                Good luck,

                 

                Hunt

                • 5. Re: .Mts and .Mpeg
                  webster_1c Level 1

                  I think its SD, how can i tell ? i'm guessing its SD, can premier help me tell this ? thanks for the tutorial link i will check it out.

                  • 6. Re: .Mts and .Mpeg
                    Colin Brougham Level 6

                    Both need to be played on a website, so should i make the make the .MTS file which is bigger the same size as the .MPG clip ?

                     

                    That, or pick/create a sequence that is smaller than both, and scale the clips to fit it. With the web, you're not locked into any particular export dimensions; practically speaking, you can create any size video you like.

                     

                    In your case, you're dealing with two different aspect ratios--the 720x576 is 4:3 (with non-square pixels), whereas the 1920x1080 clip is 16:9 (with square pixels). So, you need to decide how much of either clip you want to see in the exported video. If you go with a 4:3 sequence, you can fully fit the 4:3 clip, but you'll either crop off the sides of the 16:9 clip if you scale it to height, or you'll see black bars (letterbox) on the top and bottom if you scale it to width. Of course, you could squeeze the video, but that wouldn't look too good.

                     

                    If you go with a 16:9 sequence, you'll want to start with one smaller than the dimension of your 4:3 clip; you'd then scale the 1920x1080 clip to fit both height and width, and then you'd scale and position the 720x576 clip to reveal what you wanted to see. You could also scale it to height, and then you'd see black bars (pillarbox) on the sides.

                     

                    The bottom line is that you either have to lose a bit of the image, regardless of the aspect ratio you choose, or you preserve all of the image, but you create black bars. Choose your poison

                    • 7. Re: .Mts and .Mpeg
                      webster_1c Level 1

                      Hi Colin

                       

                      Very helpful thanks you have got it in one. My problem is i have two different aspect ratios. i guess as long as videos that play on the site are consistent i.e all with black bars or all without..........  i've just exported the 16.9 clip as a 720 by 576 (new clip). I then put this new clip  on a layer above the original 720 by 576 clip and i now see that the new clip is not as wide as 720 by 576 clip..... also the new clip has blak bars across the top and bottom..... does this make sense ?

                      • 8. Re: .Mts and .Mpeg
                        Colin Brougham Level 6

                        I've just exported the 16.9 clip as a 720 by 576 (new clip). I then put this new clip  on a layer above the original 720 by 576 clip and i now see that the new clip is not as wide as 720 by 576 clip..... also the new clip has blak bars across the top and bottom..... does this make sense ?

                         

                        Yes, but there's no reason to do what you're doing--it's much easier than that.

                         

                        If you've settled on using the 720x576 sequence as your "base," simply drop the 1920x1080 clip into that sequence, select it, and go to the Effects Control Panel; there, you'll see the Motion effect (comes standard with every video clip), which you can twirl open to reveal properties like Scale and Position. The Scale will be at 100%, but you can decrease the scale to increase the amount of the 1920x1080 clip you can see through 720x576 "window." If you scale down too far, you'll start to see black at the top and bottom. You'll probably have to do this on a shot-by-shot basis (unless you can settle on a specific scale value); you can also use Position to move the clip up or down, left or right, to reveal more of the clip you want to see, depending on the framing.

                         

                        If you prefer the widescreen look, just use a widescreen aspect ratio and frame size that is smaller than your smallest clip (for example, 720x400, square pixels), and scale both clips--the HD clip will simply have to be scaled to frame size, but the SD clip will use a similar practice outlined above.

                        • 9. Re: .Mts and .Mpeg
                          webster_1c Level 1

                          Hi Colin,

                           

                          Yes gotcha, the scaling down is much quicker and easier then what i was trying to do,

                          however my next issue is that once i get my new clip (16.9) to look

                          the same size as my other 720 by 576 clip in premiere. When i go to export i have this big thick black frame around all edges.ideally i want the clips to fill the frame and not have a big black border around all edges..... sorry if i sound dim a bit new to all this, your help is much appreciated.

                          • 10. Re: .Mts and .Mpeg
                            the_wine_snob Level 9

                            Colin,

                             

                            Did I miss the PAR of the 720 x 576 info. If it is Standard 4:3, then there will be effective cropping somewhere.

                             

                            Thanks,

                             

                            Hunt