4 Replies Latest reply on May 15, 2011 10:16 AM by Steve Grisetti

    Exporting edited PE9 files into After Effects?

    L3pton

      Is it possible to import edited Premiere Elements 9 files into After Effects to apply effects?

       

      Thanks in advance

        • 1. Re: Exporting edited PE9 files into After Effects?
          Steve Grisetti Adobe Community Professional

          Absolutely.

           

          Just use Share/Computer/AVI to create a DV-AVI or DV-MOV. These wil both load right into After Effects.

           

          You would then render out your finished After Effects files as a DV-AVI or DV-MOV so that it can be imported back into Premiere Elements.

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          • 2. Re: Exporting edited PE9 files into After Effects?
            the_wine_snob Level 9

            You might also want to explore the use of a lossless, intermediate format/CODEC. Though DV-AVI is very good, but is compressed lightly. However, with any compression, data is lost in the process. With several such compressions, even a good format/CODEC will introduce some qualtiy loss.

             

            Two very popular lossless CODEC's are, Lagarith Lossless, and UT Lossless. Both are free, and when installed properly on a system, PrE will work with both, as will AE.

             

            Good luck,

             

            Hunt

            • 3. Re: Exporting edited PE9 files into After Effects?
              Steve Grisetti Adobe Community Professional

              Unfortunately, Bill, Premiere Elements uses  a DV-AVI workflow, so using a lossless codec between these two programs is like having a strip of really wide highway between two one-lane roads. You may have lots of room for traffic on the highway, but ultimately it's going to have to squeeze down onto the one-lane road.

               

              You can put an  uncompressed AVI into Premiere Elements and output an uncompressed AVI from Premiere Elements -- but the video is compressed a DV while it's in the program so there's no way to avoid the issue of compression. In fact, all you're really doing is making the program work harder since it will have to re-render the video every time you put an uncompressed file in or export one out.

               

              If you use the DV-AVI as your file between programs, Premiere Elements will edit it natively and will not need to re-compress or re-render it at all.

               

              My thoughts on the subject anyway.

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              • 4. Re: Exporting edited PE9 files into After Effects?
                the_wine_snob Level 9

                Steve,

                 

                I respectfully disagree on this point.

                 

                 

                You can put an  uncompressed AVI into Premiere Elements and output an uncompressed AVI from Premiere Elements -- but the video is compressed a DV while it's in the program so there's no way to avoid the issue of compression

                 

                 

                If one starts with DV-AVI, there is slight lossy compression, but PrE is natively editing that DV-AVI footage. Now, if one Exports/Shares to DV-AVI, again there is a slight lossy compression, but if they Export/Share to Lagarith, or UT, there is no loss, though there is compression. AE can work with the lossless material fine, so no need for it to re-compress, and no need to introduce loss. When one Exports from AE (no ADL - Adobe Dynamic Link between AE & PrE), again with a lossless CODEC, that IS turned into DV-AVI, when back in PrE, but two levels of lossy compression have been eliminated from the workflow, and eliminating any compression that is lossy is my goal for ultimate quality.

                 

                The beauty of Lagarith, or UT, is that the files are much smaller, than with AVI Uncompressed, so other than the encoding porttion of the workflow (both CODEC's are quite fast), the resources needed are greatly reduced.

                 

                An extreme example of the use of compressed material is where one produces a DVD (MPEG-2 CODEC, which IS highly-compressed), and then uses that compressed material in a new Project, outputting again to MPEG-2 for a DVD. If one can go to the material, before the first MPEG-2 Encoding, thus saving one level of compression, the qualtiy is much better. Again, this is an extreme example, and the DV/DVC CODEC in a DV-AVI is no where nearly so bad, as with MPEG-2.

                 

                Are the extra steps worth the effort? Only the user can determine that.

                 

                Just my observations, when creating and editing intermediate files. For me, the advantage outweighs the encoding time, as quality is as high, as I can obtain.

                 

                Hunt