2 Replies Latest reply on May 30, 2011 5:48 PM by MECS

    Can't write to registry

    MECS Level 1

      I'm getting more familiar with Buddy API now.  Some of it is coming back to me.  But there is an issue that may not be related to that Xtra.  I find that I cannot write to  the registry.  This is my first exposure to Windows 7, so I'm wondering if it's a permissions issue, or??

       

      Here's a sample code:

       

      set OK = baWriteRegNumber("PVOUT", "OVR",99,"HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT")

       

      When I check my registry, the KEY named "PVOUT" is not there.  If I go into regEdit and create the KEY manually, then run the above code string, it does not write 99 into it.

       

      If I manipulate the registry directly, I can read from it with Lingo.  But I cannot write to it with Lingo.

       

      Very frustrating.  Any ideas?

       

      Thanks.

        • 1. Re: Can't write to registry
          Mike Blaustein Level 4

          It is very likely a permissions thing.  You should really only write to HKEY_CURRENT_USER unless you have admin access.  To test the theory, you can run Director as Administrator (right click on Director.exe for this option) and see if it lets you write to HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT that way.  In general though, current user is the normal place for programs to store their info.

          • 2. Re: Can't write to registry
            MECS Level 1

            Thanks again, Mike.  Yes, I chose HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT because I wanted to see if I could write to it – sort of an acid test for permissions, I guess.  By the way, do you know how to set permissions for Windows 7?

             

             

             

             

             

             

             

            From: Mike Blaustein forums@adobe.com

            Sent: Monday, May 30, 2011 5:33 PM

            To: Dewey Parker

            Subject: Re: Can't write to registry

             

             

             

             

             

            It is very likely a permissions thing.  You should really only write to HKEY_CURRENT_USER unless you have admin access.  To test the theory, you can run Director as Administrator (right click on Director.exe for this option) and see if it lets you write to HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT that way.  In general though, current user is the normal place for programs to store their info.