6 Replies Latest reply on May 31, 2011 4:13 PM by Steve Grisetti

    How to separate Audio tracks

    Captiv8r Adobe Community Professional & MVP

      Hi there

       

      Yes, I know I'm a community expert so you mighty be wondering why one would be asking here, but not for Premeire Elements. This app is new to me!

       

      I have a clip I've inserted into PE that was recorded with some odd stereo effect. I'm hoping there is an easy way to listen to each side of the stereo independently, decide which is the more pleasing of the two, then remove either the left channel or the right and fill in the opposite channel with the same audio.

       

      I've unlinked the audio from the video but am unsure how to proceed from there.

       

      Thanks in advance for any insight!

       

      Cheers... Rick

        • 1. Re: How to separate Audio tracks
          the_wine_snob Level 9

          Hello Rick,

           

          For what you want to do, I would use an audio-editing program, like Adobe Audition, or even the great free Audacity.

           

          PrE, while it has some nifty Audio capabilities, is a bit limited. In AV file editing, the Audio is assumed to be a mix-down to stereo streams. It will Import mono/1-channel streams nicely, but does not offer a full compliment of Tools to work with those, beyond the "usual suspects." A good split might take a lot of work in PrE.

           

          Audition can easily let you Solo a channel, and then Save_As (Export) to a mono/1-channel file, with just the stream that you decide on. I believe that Audacity makes it easy too, but use Audition for most things Audio, so am not an expert with Audacity. Still, it's a small program, but very powerful and best of all, its FREE!

           

          Good luck, and let us know how well the project goes.

           

          Hunt

          • 2. Re: How to separate Audio tracks
            Captiv8r Adobe Community Professional & MVP

            Thanks for the pointer, Hunt! I'll have to check out Audition or maybe even Soundbooth?

             

            I'm admittedly stuck, however. How does one go about getting the audio actually out of PE and into the other app? Copy/Paste, or Export somehow?

             

            Audio certainly doesn't seem intuitive for PE. I mean, I see it, no problem there. But doing anything with it is less than intuitive!

             

            Cheers... Rick

            • 3. Re: How to separate Audio tracks
              the_wine_snob Level 9

              Rick,

               

              Soundbooth should work well too. Have not seen it, since the beta days, but it has improved along the lines of Audition, so should be fine here.

               

              In PrE, one needs to do an Export of the Audio-only portion of the Timeline. As of PrE 8, and above, that function is now located on the Share Tab. I do not think that any form of Audio Export was retained on the old File>Export menu.

               

              I'll set up an example here, so that you can see some things that might help, depending on what you have. We will assume that your PrE Timeline has more Assets, than just this Audio Clip. If not, then you can ignore the first part here.

               

              1. In the Timeline, set the WAB (Work Area Bar) to encompass just the area of this Audio Clip. This will restrict the Export/Share to just that area.
              2. Go to the Share Tab, and choose Personal Computer (or similar syntax)
              3. Choose MPEG
              4. Check Share Work Area Only
              5. In Advanced, choose Export Audio, and uncheck Export Video
              6. In the Audio Tab, choose PCM. This will result in a PCM/WAV file @ 48KHz 16-bit and in 2-channel, that you will split apart later.
              7. Check the Multiplexer Tab, which should default to None (as you have no Video stream), but just look anyway.
              8. Name and choose the Destination Folder
              9. Hit Save to Export/Share that PCM/WAV file

               

              Hope that helps, and good luck. Remember, if your Audio file is the full Duration of the Timeline, skip the first parts, with the WAB and Share Work Area Only.

               

              Hunt

              • 4. Re: How to separate Audio tracks
                Captiv8r Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                Thanks for the assist!

                 

                The info got me part way there and I managed to flounder my way through the rest. I did end up using Audacity. Somehow I managed to mute one side of the stereo at a time and listen to each separate item. One side had a severe echo and the other sounded okay. So I copied the "good" audio, then deleted it all and pasted into a new mono track and rendered that out.

                 

                Not sure how I managed to do this in PE, but I managed to delete the existing audio track and bring back in the modified one.

                 

                As stated earlier, PE certainly lacks any form of being intuitive to use. I'm really shocked this is aimed at consumers! Couple that with the, ummm "less than stellar" help system and you really have a (cough) winning combo there!

                 

                Hokay, I'm off now to render this masterpiece out and make my minister happy. LOL

                 

                Cheers and thanks again... Rick

                • 5. Re: How to separate Audio tracks
                  the_wine_snob Level 9

                  Rick,

                   

                  Not sure how I managed to do this in PE, but I managed to delete the existing audio track and bring back in the modified one.

                   

                  I'm not sure either. Maybe brute force and a chisle to the monitor... ?

                   

                  The easiest way, for next time, is to Import that new PCM/WAV into the Project with Get Media>Folders & Files. Then, Alt+click (you are on PC, aren't you?) on the original Audio Clip (or Audio Stream of a muxed file), and Delete. Then, drag your recently Imported PCM/WAV from the Project Panel to the now empty Audio Track, where the Deleted Audio Clip was. If you have Snap ON (the S key toggles that), as you get the Head of the PCM/WAV replacement file near that of the Video Clip, the Audio will "snap" ito place.

                   

                  Glad that it worked for you.

                   

                  As stated earlier, PE certainly lacks any form of being intuitive to use. I'm really shocked this is aimed at consumers! Couple that with the, ummm "less than stellar" help system and you really have a (cough) winning combo there!

                   

                  Most of us here are in complete agreement with you. We are very fortunate to have a wonderful MOD, Steve Grisetti, who is also a prolific author, and most of his books are how to do things in PrElements (and PSElements in two cases). Steve has also done a Basic Training Series of tutorials and articles on Muvipix.com, a Web site that he co-founded. After one finishes with that, he has a complete Learning Series of tutorials and articles, though those are available by subscription to the site. The Basic Training Series is free.

                   

                  Most subscribers here point to those, the books and tutorial series, to help new users get going. Of all the Adobe programs, that could benefit from a manual, PrE is definitely one. With PrPro, the user often has a good background in NLE video work, so it's easier to use the Help Files, as they are looking for how PrPro differs from, say AVID. With PrE, the user is often very fresh to NLE work, and so many show up here totally lost. I'd love to see Adobe strike a deal with Steve, to include a copy of his PrE book with every copy!

                   

                  Good luck, and glad that we could help,

                   

                  Hunt

                  • 6. Re: How to separate Audio tracks
                    Steve Grisetti Adobe Community Professional

                    Thanks, Bill.