12 Replies Latest reply on Jun 5, 2011 12:20 PM by the_wine_snob

    Premiere Elements 9 - editing in low-res then rendering in HD

    Christina_film

      Hi all,

       

      Just started using Adobe Premiere Elements 9, editing together a 3 minute music video (so not an epic!). Half way throughand having all sorts of problems as the footage is running slowly or not running at all.

       

      Just bought a brand new laptop with i5 core processor, 4 G RAM and 7,200 rpm, so don't think hardware is the problem.

       

      Question 1.

      How can I edit in a low res version and then render in HD (is this called editing by proxy?)? A friend with Premiere Pro said there should be a very simple button that does this. It would seem a basic requirement of any video-editing software. But I can't find how to do it and the only internet search have brought up very confusing and long-winded processes.

       

      Question 2.

      Having trouble rendering. I tried rendering as a WMV and the image was very pixilated even though it looks fine on the editing screen. File size was also huge and computer struggled to render it. Also tried FLV, which didn't work at all.

       

      Would appreciate help as I've put hours into the editing process already.

       

      Many thanks,

      Christina

        • 1. Re: Premiere Elements 9 - editing in low-res then rendering in HD
          Steve Grisetti Adobe Community Professional

          Unfortunately an i5 laptop could well be underpowered, if you're editing hi-def, particularly if it's AVCHD. Is that the case here?

           

          Have you ensured that your project is properly set up for your video source? If so, you should not see red lines above the video clips on your timeline until you add effects to them. When you do add effects, you should render your timeline (press Enter) so that the red lines turn green to avoid seeing your computer's performance greatly reduced.

           

          Did you use Premiere Elements' Get Media/Video Importer tool to get your video from your camcorder to your computer?

           

          There is no easy way to do proxy editing, unfortunately. When you proxy edit, you create a low-rez version of your video and use that to do your editing and then swap in the hi-rez stuff for the final render. In the FAQs to the right of this forum, technical guru Robert Johnston explains how it's done -- but, as I said, it's not as easy as I'm sure you're hoping.

          http://forums.adobe.com/thread/390600?tstart=30

           

          There's really no substitute for a good i7 or quad core computer when it comes to working with AVCHD video.

           

          As for your WMV, remember that, by default, WMVs are usually a much lower resolution than hi-def or even standard def video -- so they're likely to look pixelated. This is because they're primarily designed for online viewing, where file size and resolution must be optimized in order to stream over the internet.

           

          Where do you ultimately plan to view this file? Online? On a DVD or BluRay? There may be an optimal format and quality setting for your particular delivery method.

          • 2. Re: Premiere Elements 9 - editing in low-res then rendering in HD
            the_wine_snob Level 9

            Christina,

             

            You might want to look over this ARTICLE. Disclaimer: I have not used OzPeter's recommendations, so cannot comment of how well, or if, they work.

             

            If you are editing AVCHD, or another flavor of H.264 CODEC, then the i5 might not be up to the task.

             

            If you have Win7-64, then 4GB of RAM will too little. It will be fine, if you are on a 32-bit OS.

             

            One HDD is an extreme limitation, as many programs and processes will be standing in line, waiting for reads and writes.

             

            Good luck,

             

            Hunt

            • 3. Re: Premiere Elements 9 - editing in low-res then rendering in HD
              John T Smith Adobe Community Professional & MVP

              >don't think hardware is the problem.

               

              If you want to open and edit a single photoshop picture file... you are fine

               

              For video (which is, in effect, 30 picture files per second, plus sound) you are not fine at all

               

              Trying to use only ONE Hard Drive for Video Editing
              .
              You are a music conductor, with a baton that you use to point to various parts of the orchestra... this is like Windows pointing to various parts of the hard drive to do Windows housekeeping or to load program segments for various functions
              .
              Now, at the same time and with the same hand... while still using the baton to conduct the orchestra... pick up a bow and play a fiddle... this would be doing something with your video file at the same time as all the other work
              .
              You as a person cannot do both at the same time with the same hand
              .
              A computer is a LITTLE better, in that it can switch from one kind of task to another very quickly... but not quickly enough for EASY video editing
              .
              You need AT LEAST two hard drives (separate drives, never a partition http://forums.adobe.com/thread/650708?tstart=0 for more) with Windows (or Mac OS) and software on your boot drive, and video files on a 2nd drive so the boot drive is not slowed down by trying to do everything
              .
              I find that the three drives I use work very well for me, for editing AVCHD video... some people use a 4th drive, so video INPUT files are on drive three and all OUTPUT files are on drive four... I only bought a mid-tower case instead of a full tower case (my bad... but had to fit in the space available on my office desk!) so I use the three drives that will fit
              .
              Depending on your exact hardware (motherboard brand & model AND USB2 enclosure brand & model AND external hard drive brand & model) AND the type of video file, you may... or may NOT... be able to use an external USB2 hard drive for video editing
              .
              Steve Grisetti in the Premiere Elements forum http://forums.adobe.com/thread/856208?tstart=0 and Jim Simon in the Premiere Pro forum http://forums.adobe.com/thread/856433?tstart=0 use USB externals for editing
              .
              A USB3 hard drive connected to a motherboard with USB3 is supposed to be fast enough for video editing (I don't have such, so don't know) but eSata DOES have a fast enough data transfer for video editing... I have not used this eSata Dock... for reference only, YMMV and all the usual disclaimers
              .
              http://www.amazon.com/Thermaltake-BlacX-eSATA-Docking-Station/dp/B001A4HAFS/ref=cm_cmu_pg_ t

              • 4. Re: Premiere Elements 9 - editing in low-res then rendering in HD
                Christina_film Level 1

                Thank you very much for your replies. I must state that I am very very non-technical  and only have a limited understand of computer terms. From the sounds of it I will have to return this laptop to the hp store and buy one with an i7 processor. Slightly annoying as I broke my top budget to buy my current one.The laptop seems to have two hard drives but one is almost full with 'recovery' stuff.

                 

                A friend suggested buying an external e-sata hard-drive so that might work.

                 

                Not certain of the file type. Originally it was HD video from a small modern camcorder which I had saved to my hard drive and then imported into Premiere. I want to create a smallish file suitable for YouTube but may also need to burn a copy for DVD/television.

                • 5. Re: Premiere Elements 9 - editing in low-res then rendering in HD
                  the_wine_snob Level 9

                  The laptop seems to have two hard drives but one is almost full with 'recovery' stuff.

                   

                  Actually, the laptop has a single, physical hard disc drive (HDD), and it is partitioned to provide that Recovery Partition. This is now common practice, and does not affect things, that using partitions and working to/from them would. Your Recovery partition would ONLY be used if you needed to Recover the system.

                   

                  As for the eSATA, that would provide you with what would amount to an additional HDD. The eSATA connection will be essentially as fast, as an internal SATA connection will be. With laptops, especially as they normally have a single HDD, the eSATA drives are great.

                   

                  Good luck,

                   

                  Hunt

                  • 6. Re: Premiere Elements 9 - editing in low-res then rendering in HD
                    Christina_film Level 1

                    Ok, have done a little more research and may not have to spend more money on another laptop or external HDD. The problem seems to be that I am editing large .MTS (AVCHD) files and the computer just can't cope. I am now trying to convert the edited footage to a less demanding format (e.g. AVI or MPEG) to see if that makes a difference.

                    • 7. Re: Premiere Elements 9 - editing in low-res then rendering in HD
                      Steve Grisetti Adobe Community Professional

                      You don't say how you're converting your AVCHD video but, before you strike out on your own, you should check out this article from the FAQs to the right of this forum. If you're not using the correct specs, the video you convert it to can be even more troublesome than the original AVCHD!

                      http://forums.adobe.com/thread/390605?tstart=0

                      • 8. Re: Premiere Elements 9 - editing in low-res then rendering in HD
                        Ted Smith Level 3

                        I am always surprised that people still maintain you need an i7 for Full HD editing

                         

                        I edit full HD AVCHD on a 2 core 2.4g computer with 4gb ram with no problems with speed of access to tracks or smoothness of preview as long as there is

                        no red line at the top of the timeline indicating the area need rendering.

                         

                        The key is to have three seperate sata type hard disks as suggested although you can get away with 2 on an i7. This made a HUGE difference as it ran like a lame dog before I did this. USB ones are useless.

                         

                        Of course an i7 would be better, not needing rendering so often and make the final product much quicker and if I were doing it for a living, this would be essential. But not having one wouldnt stop it from working.

                         

                        If you only want to post it on Youtube, there are some free or nearly free utilities for down converting your video to Standard Definition AVI before you import it into PE but make sure you convert it to the correct AVI type as stated in numerous posts in this forum.

                         

                        Standard definition edits quite smoothly, even unrendered, on my old computer. However downconverted HD is never as good as original standard definition AVI shot in the same camera with the same lens because HD is not an exact multiple of SD and you have to smooth out the unevenness somewhere. Most HD cameras have a setting to shoot in SD.

                         

                        Try reading fine text on a computer monitor with the video card pixels set to something other than the native resolution of your monitor to see the effect.

                        • 9. Re: Premiere Elements 9 - editing in low-res then rendering in HD
                          Christina_film Level 1

                          Thank you again for the advice. I ended up converting all footage to AVI through Elements 'share' and then edited that. It has given me something of reasonable quality to upload to YouTube and I will investigate further for higher quality renders. It would be handy if there was a list somewhere showing optimal settings for different purposes, codecs?? and types of footage (in basic non-technical language)

                          • 10. Re: Premiere Elements 9 - editing in low-res then rendering in HD
                            Steve Grisetti Adobe Community Professional

                            Well, there's my book, which includes just such a chart.

                            • 11. Re: Premiere Elements 9 - editing in low-res then rendering in HD
                              Christina_film Level 1

                              That's great - I'll check it out. As long as the language is basic enough for a creative but non-techie person

                              to grasp

                              • 12. Re: Premiere Elements 9 - editing in low-res then rendering in HD
                                the_wine_snob Level 9

                                I recommend Steve's book. He has a gift for taking a highly technical subject, like video editing, and distilling it down for the beginner, without loosing anything in doin so. To get an idea of his writings, see his Basic Training Series on Muvipix.com. I also think that he has a few sample chapters on Muvipix, as well.

                                 

                                Good luck, happy reading and happy editing,

                                 

                                Hunt