8 Replies Latest reply on Jun 8, 2011 8:45 PM by John Hawkinson

    CS4. .eps's into InDesign?

    NTC Ann Level 1

      Hi. For years I have always created any labels in InDesign and then translated them into Illustrator and created outlines and saved as Illustrator .eps's. All my logos and images for these are .tif's. (Illustrator is just too painfully slow and I can't use my shortcuts that I rely on.)

       

      Now this person at the label company wants me to put in the logos into InDesign as .eps's (which I do not have any .eps versions).

       

      I thought that InDesign did not like .eps's and needed .tif's.

       

      If I put the .eps images they are sending me into InDesign and do my normal process of after I get the labels set and save the files as .eps's and then open in Illustrator and resave as a .eps with all text as outlines (as worked well in the past)...

       

      Will the .eps's going into InDesign mess up the whole process? Will the .eps's work? Thank you.

        • 1. Re: CS4. .eps's into InDesign?
          macinbytes Level 4

          You can use raster EPS in InDesign, but at the cost of Bob or someone else telling you to find a new printer. EPS still is very common, but a dead workflow in most cases. Label vendors, old screen printers, die makers and several other things are normally quick to ask for EPS files and those are just a few of the ones I let fly. Otherwise with most printing if someone is asking for EPS files that means they have an antiqued workflow (software-wise or just a mental block against modern formats).

           

          There is always the possibility that they are using EPS files for a reason. Normally at the print shop I work at you have to wait a number of days from when you submit files to allow for printing, drying, finishing, packing, shipping. With their workflow they may be traveling back in time to 1995 in order to significantly reduce lead times.

          • 2. Re: CS4. .eps's into InDesign?
            NTC Ann Level 1

            So I can put the .eps logo into the InDesign file, save it as an InDesign .eps and then translate into Illustrator and it will work. Thanks.

            • 3. Re: CS4. .eps's into InDesign?
              macinbytes Level 4

              You betcha! Be careful with spots like you always would be and check the flattener preview, but it should be no different than tif other than upsetting to many's sensibilities.

               

              Take care to use a consistent eps type. Generally JPEG (Maximum Quality) is close enough for the ladies we roll with. JPEGging has its downfalls, but if you are going InDesign to EPS and sending it to someone who is demanding EPS it should be close enough for all in tents and porpoises.

              • 4. Re: CS4. .eps's into InDesign?
                John Hawkinson Level 5

                Err.

                 

                Generally speaking, vector files are better than raster files, especially for logos.

                EPS is a vector format and TIFF is a raster format. Unless you have shoehorned raster data into EPS, it's superior.

                 

                You will hear words, especially on this forum, about the obsolescence of EPS. I think it is overblown, and there are still plenty of cases where EPS is more convenient to work with than its successor format, PDF. But it's certainly a lot less popular and widely used, and it does seem to cause problems for some people.

                 

                All my logos and images for these are .tif's.

                This language is confusing. If you have vector images in Illustrator, one would like to hope they have no TIFFs involved.

                 

                I thought that InDesign did not like .eps's and needed .tif's.

                As you have learned, this is false and without foundation.

                 

                Macinbytes seems to be talking about "raster EPS," but I don't know why? Macinbytes???

                 

                Take care to use a consistent eps type. Generally JPEG (Maximum Quality) is close enough for the ladies we roll with.

                Huh? @!@!?? JPEG is not a type of EPS!

                InDesign's EPS export does let you specify a number of choices about EPS files, such as what format the embedded preview (for EPS-using applications that do not parse them but need something to show on the screen), but JPEG is not one of the options.

                • 5. Re: CS4. .eps's into InDesign?
                  macinbytes Level 4

                  JPEG would be the encoding option for raster EPS files. I believe Binary is the best in terms of size to quality and worst in terms of being supported, best in terms of causing printing headaches. ASCII is worst on file size, best on support. JPEG is best on size, quality loss adjustable to a degree and generally error free at the requirement of a PostScript Level 2 RIP.

                   

                  Nothing wrong with using raster logos if that is all you have. I'll take a red bucket of raster files if they have enough res to fly before I go rebuilding someone's logo on the free.

                   

                  If you have a hillbilly printer who is still importing EPS files into QuackXPress that's what you have. Years and years of Quark conditioning says save all your photoshop files out to EPS and import into Quark. It's mostly Quark having done a bad job thoughout the years of handling PSDs and getting burned by transparency again and again and again. If you know the guy is gonna just dump whatever you give them into an imposition and not take any regard for transparency an EPS is pretty safe, certainly shouldn't trust them with a PDF above v1.3.

                   

                  Superior or not, if you are stuck with EPS you are stuck with EPS. An LZW tiff isn't a huge amount of file space more, but some days you just have to swallow your sensibility and spit out EPS files rather than try to school a stubborn printer. Someone on the forums one day made a comment that when you are given the option of a printer who requires EPS and the only other option is someone with a letter press that only owns 11 E's you are probably better to go the EPS route.

                  • 6. Re: CS4. .eps's into InDesign?
                    macinbytes Level 4

                    Sorry to get sidetracked. Are you saying you don't have Photoshop or a raster image editor that can produce and EPS files? There are a bunch that can convert tiff to EPS.

                     

                    You may want to just check if you printer is crazy. Find out what software they are using.

                     

                    There is really no reason you should have to take the step of invoking Illustrator to do this.

                     

                    Also, there are a ton of label companies out there. I work with one that requires output files to be sent as EPS which is kind of a mellow harshener, but on the other hand they don't screw up the labels and the price is right. Some of the big label vendors will do nice stuff like roll them backwards, not have the right number in a roll or forget to round the corners. Many reasons to stick with a good label vendor, but also a ton of vendors out there who are thirsty for work.

                    • 7. Re: CS4. .eps's into InDesign?
                      NTC Ann Level 1

                      Hi. Thanks for all your help. This is a company we've used for years and the people in charge want to stick with them. They kept saying that the logo looked blurry and like it had been masked. Unfortunately, I've never really understood masking and no there was no masking. Plus I don't know if the Flexograph process is different from other printing needs.

                       

                      What I had done, since I couldn't get a tight clipping path around the letters and parts of the logo — is that I put the logo on the background image and then clipped close so that when I placed the logo, it would not have a white fringe but would pick up the colors of the image in back to match the image and blend in.

                       

                      So what I did was do my normal process and then when I got it to Illustrator, I replaced the 2 logos with the .eps ones they sent me. It worked. Thank you again for all your help in this. I guess I just have to do the extra steps with the logo when the label gets that far. I haven't done our labels for years but our normal person is due in July so I am doing labels again for the time being.

                       

                      Thank you!!!

                      • 8. Re: CS4. .eps's into InDesign?
                        John Hawkinson Level 5

                        Sorry, I meant to reply to this on Monday.

                        Macinbytes wrote:

                         

                        JPEG would be the encoding option for raster EPS files. I believe Binary is the best in terms of size to quality and worst in terms of being supported, best in terms of causing printing headaches. ASCII is worst on file size, best on support. JPEG is best on size, quality loss adjustable to a degree and generally error free at the requirement of a PostScript Level 2 RIP.

                        Err, where is it that you believe JPEG is an encoding option for EPS files, raster or otherwise? Not in Illustrator anywhere that I see. (In my earlier post, I mistakenly thought that NTC Ann was exporting EPS files from InDesign, but that's backwards. InDesign doesn't export JPEG EPS files either though).

                         

                        Internally PostScript files can compress streams of data (that data can be images, but it need not be) in a variety of ways, including JPEG, CCITT Fax, LZW, and Flate (ZIP). And binary data can be expressed in raw binary form or in ASCII form or in a few encodings somewhere in-between.

                         

                        But this doesn't have anyhting to do with Illustrator's EPS export.

                        Nothing wrong with using raster logos if that is all you have. I'll take a red bucket of raster files if they have enough res to fly before I go rebuilding someone's logo on the free.

                        [emphasis mine].

                         

                        But it's not all we have! We're starting out with clean resolution-independent EPS files (or at least that's how I read it). Converting them to a fixed resolution raster format where it is unnecessary is nearly criminal.